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NLDS: Brewers vs Braves


Unknøwn
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28 minutes ago, Unknøwn said:

Pache, Langeliers and Terrance Gore have joined the Braves for workouts. Likely traveling for depth purposes. Langeliers as an emergency catcher with Vogt hurt. Gore is a PR specialist and Pache brings that elite defense. Roster is due in by 10 AM on Friday. 

It took me a second to figure out what PR was.....I was thinking that the Falcons really don't need a punt returner now and I thought that the PR department of the braves does a pretty **** good job.

 

But this is what happens when you read the internet without sufficient coffee.

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1 hour ago, falconsd56 said:

It took me a second to figure out what PR was.....I was thinking that the Falcons really don't need a punt returner now and I thought that the PR department of the braves does a pretty **** good job.

 

But this is what happens when you read the internet without sufficient coffee.

I thought the same at first. 

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9 minutes ago, falconsd56 said:

Can he hit at all?

If Gore is getting an AB then something went really bad or really good. The guy has been in 2 WS and three different playoff rosters in October. Every single appearance in his playoff career is as a runner only. He won a ring in KC. 

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9 minutes ago, oztin said:

Just supposedly a really good story on Snit and the Braves on the athletic does someone mind posting it I don't have an account thank you so much if you do

ATLANTA — The outward calm that washed over Brian Snitker — and by extension, his players — during this most stressful of regular seasons wasn’t always a consistent part of his makeup. The Braves “jerked me out of managing” (his words) in Single-A Macon in 1993 because some in the organization viewed him as being too tough on young players, ironic for a manager whose greatest career moments in later years would stem from his ability to connect with youths.

“I guess that was the first time I was recycled,” Snitker said, smiling. “I had done nothing but managing, and I was pissed. I’m thinking, ‘Good God, if they think I’m too tough on players, what are they going to get when they get up here with you (media) guys after them all the time?’ But when I look back it, that was probably the best thing that ever happened to me because I was coaching, and I got to watch other managers in the minors. I saw how they interacted with guys and did things. And I saw how not to do a lot of things.”

Snitker, once a minor-league lifer whose stories with the Durham Bulls found their way into the movie, “Bull Durham,” now views his relative demotion 28 years ago as a blessing. The same year he was removed as a manager, he needed to care for an aunt who suffered from a brain tumor. She eventually died. His father suffered a massive heart attack and died. His wife was diagnosed with breast cancer.

He gained needed perspective. He somewhat mellowed, became a little more patient. He likely had picked some character traits from Richard Snitker, his late father, whose job as a beer and liquor distributor took him on the road five days per week. When the family had friends over, Richard “was the life of the party,” Brian said. But, “He was a hot-head. I witnessed it a lot. He was tough.”

Snitker’s consistently cool demeanor and the tone he sets with his coaching staff were key elements in the Braves’ ability to endure the first four months of this season below or at the .500 mark and not come apart, despite the losses of Mike Soroka, Marcell Ozuna and Ronald Acuña Jr. General manager Alex Anthopoulos is getting deserved credit for making moves at the trade deadline that more than panned out, and the players obviously showed tremendous resolve. But this season doesn’t stay on the rails without Snitker and his staff.

It’s somewhat astounding, but maybe not, that even after four straight NL East Division titles Snitker still has his critics who view him as a mere fortunate passenger in this journey, not the person driving the bus. A manager or coach in any sport often makes in-game decisions that get second-guessed and sometimes backfire. But the overwhelming majority of his decisions turn out correct. More importantly, what often goes unnoticed is that game management has become a relatively small percentage of the job in pro sports.

“We’re all baseball people, we all played the game, so we have a pretty good idea what to do,” said Walt Weiss, the Braves’ bench coach, a former manager in Colorado and a 14-year major leaguer. “The game tells you what to do. Does that mean it works all the time? Of course not. It’s not an exact science. But establishing and maintaining a culture that’s conducive to winning, dealing with a mishmash of personalities from around the globe, that’s where a manager earns his keep. And somebody is always mad at you. Maybe a player didn’t get in, and fans — 50 percent of them don’t like you. It comes with the territory.”

I thought it would be a good idea to explore this subject and how the consistent demeanor of Snitker and his coaching staff has impacted the Braves, not only this season but really since late in 2016 when he took over as interim manager for Fredi González. I interviewed Snitker, Anthopoulos, Weiss, hitting coach Kevin Seitzer, pitching coach Rick Kranitz and third-base and infield coach Ron Washington. The following is a collection of comments from our individual chats, edited for brevity.

For background: Snitker was named interim manager after González’s firing, retained by former team executives John Hart and John Coppolella in 2017, then kept in 2018 by Anthopoulos, the new general manager, when Coppolella was banned from baseball and Hart was pressured out following an international prospect signing scandal. Seitzer has been with the club since 2015, Washington 2017, Weiss 2018, Kranitz 2019.

The Snit demeanor

Snitker: “I didn’t want to be one of those guys who was riding a rollercoaster. Good, bad or ugly, I wanted to come through the door every day and be the same guy, and I expect the same of the players. That’s a trait of this team, consistency. Because when **** goes wrong in the game, they’re going to look at me to see how I react. If I’m the same guy, they’re going to think, ‘OK, we’re OK.’ There are times you’re going to lose five, six games in a row, and there’s nothing you can do about it. You just have to wear it.”

Weiss: “When things go wrong, players look at the end of the dugout and see how the manager is going to react. That’s contagious, not just with the players but the coaches, too. When a manager starts to micro-manage because things aren’t going great, people start walking on. You look over your shoulder. But Snit’s a metronome. The players see that.”

Seitzer: “That first meeting he had in Pittsburgh (after González’s firing) was emotional for me. He laid his heart out and just said, ‘Go after it because it’s all we can do. We’ll see where this goes.’ I’ve never seen an immediate impact in the clubhouse and dugout like that before. And I love Fredi. He was great to me. But Snit was like grandpa coming in. He loved everybody and respected them, and everybody loved and respected him.”

Anthopoulos: “This is the biggest compliment I can give him. We’ve been together for four years, and we’ve won all four years. The first year was smooth, start to finish, even though he didn’t know me, and there was job uncertainty with his contract. The next two years, we were contending. But this year when we were below .500 for four months, and he was the exact same guy. This isn’t me just trying to give you nice comments for an article. That’s fact. There wasn’t one time where it was like, ‘We’re losing, he’s changing, he has job security now’ — none of that. He takes the losses hard like we all do, but he never complains. I mean, never.”

Washington: “He has a calm about him that the players recognize. That’s a quality you have to have because when you hit hard times people are looking to the guy who’s leading them to lead them out of it. He doesn’t panic so nobody else panics.”

Kranitz: “They want to see calmness. There’s frustrations of the game, and they don’t like it. This is a very emotional game. There are times I’m pacing back and forth and look down at the end of the dugout, and he’s cool.”

“90 percent is the other stuff”

Weiss: “Ten percent job of the job is game management stuff, 90 percent is the other stuff. When people are second-guessing you, being the armchair quarterback, they don’t understand everything going on out there (in the bullpen), out here (dugout), guys who may be dinged up, guys who may be overworked, guys who may be sinking with whatever’s going on (off the field). They don’t know what he knows. As coaches, we’ve got his back because we’re aware of all the stuff. Game decisions are 10 percent of the job. The other 90 percent is keeping guys in line and together.”

Kranitz: “A lot of people have no idea how much goes into every day.”

Snitker: “What goes on back in (the clubhouse) on a daily basis with these guys — you almost relax when the game starts. I like where we live now because I have about a 20-minute drive to the ballpark, and it gives me time to just think and relax. Every time you turn around, there’s somebody sticking their head in the door. But that’s OK. It is managing people.”

Anthopoulos: “I never thought about it from a percentage standpoint but I’ll say this: When you’re looking at big league coaches or manager, forget the knowledge and content and whatever: If you don’t have the ability to connect, you don’t get through the door. It’s similar to be a teacher. Just because you have the knowledge and the content and the work ethic, can you deliver it? Can you get through to them? At the minor-league level, it’s very different. At the major-league level, you need to earn the respect and the buy-in. If you don’t have that, you can throw all of the other stuff in the trash.”

Starting 52-55 and keeping it together

Snitker: “It was hard. Right now I’m so mentally exhausted. But I always had the feeling, ‘I know it’s gonna happen; we just haven’t had our run yet.’ It took longer than I thought, but they did a good job handling the adversity. It’s not like we were even on top of the water. We were (underneath), sucking air through a straw.”

Washington: “There was never a day when I didn’t want to leave my house and come to the ballpark because I always felt one of those guys was going to give us some magic. I saw it for three years. We’ve got the same personnel, even though we had some new guys mixed in. Yeah, we had jumped the rails. We got sideways. It was just one of those years where we had to do it the hard way. The struggles are a part of it, and that’s where the manager and the coaching staff come in, trying to make certain the players don’t lose their focus of who we are and their abilities as a group. When we finally got the lead, everybody behind you is looking at your *** and elbows.”

Weiss: “It was tough sledding this year. There were doubts along the way, June and July. Early on we just assumed we’d get over the hump at some point, and we didn’t for a long time. It was a perfect storm with what Alex did at the deadline, and we started getting healthy. One of the biggest moves as far as morale was after Acuña went down Alex getting Joc (Pederson). When Acuña went down, it was really easy to think, ‘That’s it.’ Nobody was saying that, but those thoughts start to creep in. But when Alex gets Joc, it was, ‘OK, we’re still going after this thing.’ It sounds generic, but you have to bring positive energy. The players are always reading into things. They’re always looking for something. I was a player, and I know that. If there’s negative energy, they pick it up like that. Were there concerns? Of course. But it’s our job to get the best out of the club, and the ability to maintain perspective is a big deal. If you get caught up in the hype or in the tough times, you lose perspective.”

Seitzer: “There was no sulking, no sob stories, no whining, no complaining. The work and the demeanor never changed. We had people coming and going, but whoever came in was a shot in the arm and blended in. We were spittin’ and sputterin’ as an offense, and we just couldn’t get over the hump, but it finally started clicking after the trade deadline.”

Diverse personalities

Snitker: “The (coaches are) all different, and they’re rock stars. We’re one of the few teams that have all these veteran coaches who also played in the majors for a long time.”

Weiss: “I was hired by John Hart, so it was kind of weird time (during the signing scandal). Coppy was gone, and stuff was going on, and it was a month or so before they announced it. The fact I had managed before, I could empathize with Snit because I sat in that seat, and I think the fact I had a relationship with Bobby (Cox) from when I played here carried some weight. My first impression of Snit was I felt like he had a good gut, good eyes. We talk over the course of a game, me, him and Kranny. Sometimes we’ll say, ‘This is what we think we should do here,’ but Snit will say no, and it works out. Ninety-eight percent of the time we’re on the same page  From a coaching standpoint he gives us the freedom to coach.”

Seitzer: “We’re all different personalities, but we all have the ability to relate to players. We were all grinders when we played. None of us were the superstars, except for Chipper (Jones), and he brings a whole different perspective. He’s recent, he has a great way about him with players, and he knows about hitting.”

Kranitz: “I was with the Phillies in 2018 when (the Braves) clinched the first time. I came out that day, and I remember looking on the field thinking, ‘We’re in big trouble.’ There was a sense that this team was not going to be denied. It’s hard to explain. But being in the game as long as I was, I sensed, ‘They’re going to do it today.’ I didn’t know Snit and a lot of the guys here. But any time a team starts to jell, a lot of credit has to be given to the manager because of going through the hard times and keeping a team together. All of us coaches understand that.”

Anthopoulos, who has changed some staff since 2018: “I don’t believe the front office should unilaterally hire a coach. The manager has to work with these people day in and day out. He has to stamp them. If he’s not good with him, we’re going to the next candidate. The same way you try to build cohesion with the players, you need cohesion with the staff because I’ve seen it where the coaches are not aligned, and it spilled out onto the players, and it’s not conducive to a winning environment.”

The Braves are 310-235 (.569) with four division titles in the past four years, and they came to within one win of going to the World Series in 2020. But Snitker still often is second-guessed for in-game decisions, mostly in bullpen management. This neither surprises nor concerns Anthopoulos, who rewarded Snitker with a contract extension in the spring.

“Just like in any sport, everybody plays manager during a game,” Anthopoulos said. “Snit will be the first one to tell you, ‘I’m not going to bat a thousand as a manager,’ just like I’m not going to bat a thousand as a GM. To sit there and scrutinize one game here and there, it just doesn’t work that way. We’re not going to win every game. There’s going to be times when we lose, and you think we should’ve won. But being consistent in who you are as a person, it’s incredibly important when you’re struggling, and Snit has never changed, no matter what the circumstances were. That’s much easier said than done.”

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6 hours ago, falconsd56 said:

It took me a second to figure out what PR was.....I was thinking that the Falcons really don't need a punt returner now and I thought that the PR department of the braves does a pretty **** good job.

 

But this is what happens when you read the internet without sufficient coffee.

When he said Langeliers, I thought it said Langerhans, as in Ryan Langerhans. Bad reading here as well

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4 minutes ago, Unknøwn said:

Game 3 on Monday will start at 1:07

Games 4&5 will be 5:07 if necessary

So this series will get no primetime slots. 

Why must the MLB make it harder to sell tickets and watch. I was willing to go to both games and pay to go to both games, but I'm not taking highly limited PTO to go... No weekday playoff game should start before 5pm EST. And they wonder why interest in baseball has waned. LETS JUST PLAY THE MOST IMPORTANT GAMES OF THE YEAR AT 1PM ON A MONDAY!

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Brewers beat writer said Counsell may use Peralta in the bullpen without Williams. He said Peralta may be there for 1&2 then throw 3 or 4 innings in game 3. He also said Adrian Houser could be a key to help fill that void. A lot if people thought Hader would just go 2 innings to help. Hader told the reporter that he doubts he can go more than 1 inning and thinks it would be unreasonable to ask him to do it. Hader has not pitched more than 1 inning in a game all season. 

Brewers reporter also mentioned the pitchers that gave them the most issues were breaking ball pitchers. He said they got a little better in the 2nd half but mostly offspeed pitches gave them fits at times. 

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15 hours ago, ATLFalcon36 said:

Why must the MLB make it harder to sell tickets and watch. I was willing to go to both games and pay to go to both games, but I'm not taking highly limited PTO to go... No weekday playoff game should start before 5pm EST. And they wonder why interest in baseball has waned. LETS JUST PLAY THE MOST IMPORTANT GAMES OF THE YEAR AT 1PM ON A MONDAY!

During the LDS they should rotate days. AL plays on one day then NL plays on the next. That way each fan base has the opportunity to see their team play. 

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5 minutes ago, Jimsmusic™ said:

244130458_10158840186142831_499948314784

 

WTH? webb is there but not rodriguez

Rodriguez was not pitching well. He had a 5.25 ERA the final month. The Brewers are also very familiar with him and hit .300 against him this year. Yona will also be taking on the role of late game RP. 

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3 minutes ago, Unknøwn said:

Rodriguez was not pitching well. He had a 5.25 ERA the final month. The Brewers are also very familiar with him and hit .300 against him this year. Yona will also be taking on the role of late game RP. 

Yeah it kinda makes sense.

I wonder if he will make it if the braves advance.

I was more impressed with Strider than I was with Lee  overall there were no real surprises

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