Jump to content

Falcons Offensive Coordinator Dave Ragone


Recommended Posts

He's a former Louisville QB vaguely remember him having a good run in NFL Europe.  Career clipboard holder at the top level.  

Has worked with AS in the past and likely sees this as an internship into his first play calling role.  He's a young guy with ambition and actual on field experience that seemed like a theme for Smith on his offensive staff.  They went veteran coaches to fix the D but I think Smith wanted guys who can grow into their roles on offense and help keep his perspective fresh.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, brewman said:

Since the guy calling the plays is the HC, the designated OC spends the week doing the detail dirty work the OC does, at the direction of the play caller (HC), but doesn't get the credit for the quality of the offense on Sunday. Doesn't sound like a great gig (other than the paycheck) to me.  I could see an older, experienced coach fulfilling this role, but a younger guy?

IMHO it can be a great accolade on a coaches resume for a future HC position.  Think Matt Lafleur.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Let it be known, this offense is going to be run by AS.
 

He brought in Ragone to be his right hand man, so Ragone will be the #2 guy on offense, likely helping AS put together game plans and design plays among many other things, but irrespective of titles, this offense is going to be Arthur Smiths.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, MoFalconsFan56 said:

Exactly what I was gonna say lol. Wish I knew somebody that could get me that job heck they can pay me less than league min lol 

I want to believe Smith will groom him to take over the offense in a couple of years..im sure Smith wants to be able to control things as he settles in, then maybe will turn over some duties to Ragone once everything is established 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There will be one man at the very top of the offense, than man will be AS. He will call all the shots. 

Any responsibilities given to others, will be given to them by AS. If someone else calls any shots, it will be because AS told them to.

There seems to be a lot of talking past each other here on this topic. Of course the other coaches on offense will have a lot of responsibility. In that,  Ragone will do what AS tells him to do. So yes, of course AS will have Ragone doing many things for him.

But this is Arthur Smiths offense, period. 
 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 minutes ago, gazoo said:

There will be one man at the very top of the offense, than man will be AS. He will call all the shots. 

Any responsibilities given to others, will be given to them by AS. If someone else calls any shots, it will be because AS told them to.

There seems to be a lot of talking past each other here on this topic. Of course the other coaches on offense will have a lot of responsibility. In that,  Ragone will do what AS tells him to do. So yes, of course AS will have Ragone doing many things for him.

But this is Arthur Smiths offense, period. 
 

 

You think Ragone will be in the booth giving Smith info from a different perspective? I feel like Smith will be on the field level every game so having Ragone upstairs detailing the defensive lineup will definitely help Smith call in the plays

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, gazoo said:

There will be one man at the very top of the offense, than man will be AS. He will call all the shots. 

Any responsibilities given to others, will be given to them by AS. If someone else calls any shots, it will be because AS told them to.

There seems to be a lot of talking past each other here on this topic. Of course the other coaches on offense will have a lot of responsibility. In that,  Ragone will do what AS tells him to do. So yes, of course AS will have Ragone doing many things for him.

But this is Arthur Smiths offense, period. 
 

 

Very much so.
 

Ragone is also in transition from QB coach with bears to OC with falcons. Smith won’t be putting as much on him as he would a more experienced OC. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

20 hours ago, Malachore said:

He will still help with game planning and have input on play calls on game day. He'll also be an extra set of eyes for the offense, I'm sure AS values what he can bring or else he wouldn't have hired him.

Exactly!

 

He's going to be another set of eyes on gamedays as well.  More than likely he will be the "eyes in the sky" for Smith and give him a different idea of what defenses are doing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 hours ago, Slumerican said:

You think Ragone will be in the booth giving Smith info from a different perspective? I feel like Smith will be on the field level every game so having Ragone upstairs detailing the defensive lineup will definitely help Smith call in the plays

That's quite possible as we know AS is going to be down on the field. Ragone was passing game coordinator in Chicago , I could see him up in the booth during games for sure. He was also quality control coach for the Washington Redskins, so he's going to be in the film room watching tons of film of the opponents defenses informing AS of trends and patterns to exploit. 

I agree with those saying Ragone is going to have a ton of responsibility. I think Ragone's background is a good fit for the kind of right hand man assistant AS needs. They will be working very closely together in game plans, play designs, in the film room and on game day communicating what is happening in real time.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 6/27/2021 at 2:38 AM, AUTiger7222 said:

Right. The HC doesn't have enough time in the day and week to coordinator the game plan for the opponent plus the individual game plans on offense and defense. That is why when Dan Quinn tried to do both as HC and DC he failed so miserably at it. He might surprise people in Dallas now that he's back focused only on the defense and not the whole HC deal.

Who's the jackass that downvoted this and what possible reason could you have to downvote this? I'm genuinely curious.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Below is an article I copied that describes what a quality control coach does. I submit to you that Ragone's background as a former quality control coach is EXACTLY what AS needs. as HC of the Falcons, AS will not have the time to watch dozens of hours of film on each upcoming opponent to establish trends and patterns.  But with AS brilliance in putting together game plans, he will need to know these trends and patterns. Ragone will no doubt be providing these and also communicating in real time during games what the defense is doing based on his hours of film review. 

THE ROLE OF AN NFL QUALITY CONTROL COACH

The path to become an NFL head coach can be rigorous. An education along with a football background helps. Being able to teach and communicate is an asset as well. However, even if you were born into the middle of a coaching tree (see Kyle Shanahan), you still have to pay your dues to get there. You can take the road through the High school and college ranks in order to gain the background experience necessary, but in many instances you will need to do an internship as a Quality Control Coach.

Contemporary coaches are always searching for an edge over their opponents. Now that the Computer Age is upon us, the analyzing has become more technical. Many of those coaches have assistants called the "Quality Control Coach." However, the QCC doesn't really do much coaching at all. They spend all day multitasking, breaking down film up to five weeks in advance and analyzing data. They work all hours, in hotel lobbies, on airplanes and at their team's headquarters producing reports for their Head Coach. They do get to do some coaching though. The QC coaches often run the "Scout" team in practices. From their extensive film work and breaking down plays, the QCC can be a great help preparing their team because they know the tendencies of their opponents. They make sure the Scout teams give the starters an accurate look at what they'll face on Sunday in practice during game weeks.

Denver Broncos Head Coach John Fox knows just what to do more with the data from his QC Coaches. In addition to being able to call up any game on video, he can pull up any statistic to match that play. "What you do is chart the tendency of that (opposing) coach, so that you can tell your team that 'in this situation it'll always be a run or always be a pass,'" says Fox. "So your team knows what to expect."

Quality-control coaches also learn N.F.L. systems from the long hours spent watching film. In no time they absorb the ins and outs of the chess match known as football and the ingenious distinctions between wins and losses. They also pickup how Pro teams organize their practices and their off-season, weight training and conditioning programs. Having access to the scouting, all the video, the personnel departments and the front office, the Quality Control Coach might be the best on the job training for anyone aspiring to become an NFL Head Coach.

Todd Haley called it:

"The greatest job in football as far as learning."

Tony Sparano added:

"That job was the most valuable experience I had. That was my first piece of work in this league. Quality control rounded me, made me a better coach."

The position as we know it in modern day football was created by Mike Holmgren in 1990 when he was the Offensive Coordinator for the San Francisco 49ers. Mike needed someone to transcribe the Niners Playbook and copy it to a computer. That someone was Jon Gruden. The job also included analyzing opponents, breaking down statistics, tracking and charting plays during games and fetching coffee. Gruden earned a salary of $500 a month, turned 18 hour days and often spent his nights on a cot in the office drawing up plays on his computer. Burning the midnight oil allowed him to pick up the necessary seasoning for his jobs as Head Coach with Oakland and Tampa Bay.

Gruden:

"I was one of the first guys in the 49ers organization to put the game plan on a computer and store the information so that it was accessible next week, next  year and later on down the road for future games. Over the years, all of my computer files became outdated because the software improved. We had to hire a couple of guys – we called them the ‘sweatshop’ – to go in there and really do nothing but re-draw all of the plays and re-type all of the information. That’s not a lot of fun, but when you’re doing that you learn the offense. You learn what ‘Zoom’ is and what ‘Slot’ is, and what the difference is. You learn the different protections and blocking schemes and calls that are made."

The list of NFL coaches that have completed an "Apprenticeship" as the QC Coach include Todd Haley, Eric Mangini, Steve Spagnuolo, Brad Childress, Tony Sparano and Raheem Morris. Former Broncos head coach Mike Shanahan's son Kyle did a QCC stint under Jon Gruden with Tampa Bay in 2004 and is now the Offensive Coordinator for the Houston Texans. Don't be surprised if Kyle isn't a Head Coach sometime in the near future. Other NFL sons that are currently employed as QC Coaches are Tony Sparano, Jr., Kevin Gilbride, Jr., Sam Mills III, Bobby April, Jr., Chad Grimm and Ryan Slowik. The Offensive Quality Control Coach for the Denver Broncos is Brian Callahan, son of former head coach Bill Callahan. On Defense, that distinction belongs to Jay Rodgers. Hopefully, the next step up for these QC coaches will be as a position coach.

Tim Berbenich spent his first two seasons (2006-07) as an offensive quality control coach with Tampa Bay. He is entering his fifth season with the Buccaneers in 2010 and second as assistant wide receivers coach.

"Our number one responsibility is to get the coaches prepared to start studying the game plans," Berbenich said. "At the end of the day, I have to draw the plays, and if I don’t know them I can’t draw them. If you don’t know what they’re doing on defense you can’t break the film down. You can’t just know what one guy does, you have to know what all 11 players are doing. As far as drawing the plays and learning the playbook, I learned it all. I had no choice."


That $500 a month salary is roughly $22,000 per year these days. The QC job has become so important that even Special-Teams coordinators are asking for their own Quality-Control coaches, and QC coaches now have agents.

If Quality is Job One as the Ford Motor Company claims, The Quality Control Coach is an essential element to any NFL team.

 

 
 
 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, gazoo said:

Below is an article I copied that describes what a quality control coach does. I submit to you that Ragone's background as a former quality control coach is EXACTLY what AS needs. as HC of the Falcons, AS will not have the time to watch dozens of hours of film on each upcoming opponent to establish trends and patterns.  But with AS brilliance in putting together game plans, he will need to know these trends and patterns. Ragone will no doubt be providing these and also communicating in real time during games what the defense is doing based on his hours of film review. 

THE ROLE OF AN NFL QUALITY CONTROL COACH

The path to become an NFL head coach can be rigorous. An education along with a football background helps. Being able to teach and communicate is an asset as well. However, even if you were born into the middle of a coaching tree (see Kyle Shanahan), you still have to pay your dues to get there. You can take the road through the High school and college ranks in order to gain the background experience necessary, but in many instances you will need to do an internship as a Quality Control Coach.

Contemporary coaches are always searching for an edge over their opponents. Now that the Computer Age is upon us, the analyzing has become more technical. Many of those coaches have assistants called the "Quality Control Coach." However, the QCC doesn't really do much coaching at all. They spend all day multitasking, breaking down film up to five weeks in advance and analyzing data. They work all hours, in hotel lobbies, on airplanes and at their team's headquarters producing reports for their Head Coach. They do get to do some coaching though. The QC coaches often run the "Scout" team in practices. From their extensive film work and breaking down plays, the QCC can be a great help preparing their team because they know the tendencies of their opponents. They make sure the Scout teams give the starters an accurate look at what they'll face on Sunday in practice during game weeks.

Denver Broncos Head Coach John Fox knows just what to do more with the data from his QC Coaches. In addition to being able to call up any game on video, he can pull up any statistic to match that play. "What you do is chart the tendency of that (opposing) coach, so that you can tell your team that 'in this situation it'll always be a run or always be a pass,'" says Fox. "So your team knows what to expect."

Quality-control coaches also learn N.F.L. systems from the long hours spent watching film. In no time they absorb the ins and outs of the chess match known as football and the ingenious distinctions between wins and losses. They also pickup how Pro teams organize their practices and their off-season, weight training and conditioning programs. Having access to the scouting, all the video, the personnel departments and the front office, the Quality Control Coach might be the best on the job training for anyone aspiring to become an NFL Head Coach.

Todd Haley called it:

"The greatest job in football as far as learning."

Tony Sparano added:

"That job was the most valuable experience I had. That was my first piece of work in this league. Quality control rounded me, made me a better coach."

The position as we know it in modern day football was created by Mike Holmgren in 1990 when he was the Offensive Coordinator for the San Francisco 49ers. Mike needed someone to transcribe the Niners Playbook and copy it to a computer. That someone was Jon Gruden. The job also included analyzing opponents, breaking down statistics, tracking and charting plays during games and fetching coffee. Gruden earned a salary of $500 a month, turned 18 hour days and often spent his nights on a cot in the office drawing up plays on his computer. Burning the midnight oil allowed him to pick up the necessary seasoning for his jobs as Head Coach with Oakland and Tampa Bay.

Gruden:

"I was one of the first guys in the 49ers organization to put the game plan on a computer and store the information so that it was accessible next week, next  year and later on down the road for future games. Over the years, all of my computer files became outdated because the software improved. We had to hire a couple of guys – we called them the ‘sweatshop’ – to go in there and really do nothing but re-draw all of the plays and re-type all of the information. That’s not a lot of fun, but when you’re doing that you learn the offense. You learn what ‘Zoom’ is and what ‘Slot’ is, and what the difference is. You learn the different protections and blocking schemes and calls that are made."

The list of NFL coaches that have completed an "Apprenticeship" as the QC Coach include Todd Haley, Eric Mangini, Steve Spagnuolo, Brad Childress, Tony Sparano and Raheem Morris. Former Broncos head coach Mike Shanahan's son Kyle did a QCC stint under Jon Gruden with Tampa Bay in 2004 and is now the Offensive Coordinator for the Houston Texans. Don't be surprised if Kyle isn't a Head Coach sometime in the near future. Other NFL sons that are currently employed as QC Coaches are Tony Sparano, Jr., Kevin Gilbride, Jr., Sam Mills III, Bobby April, Jr., Chad Grimm and Ryan Slowik. The Offensive Quality Control Coach for the Denver Broncos is Brian Callahan, son of former head coach Bill Callahan. On Defense, that distinction belongs to Jay Rodgers. Hopefully, the next step up for these QC coaches will be as a position coach.

Tim Berbenich spent his first two seasons (2006-07) as an offensive quality control coach with Tampa Bay. He is entering his fifth season with the Buccaneers in 2010 and second as assistant wide receivers coach.

"Our number one responsibility is to get the coaches prepared to start studying the game plans," Berbenich said. "At the end of the day, I have to draw the plays, and if I don’t know them I can’t draw them. If you don’t know what they’re doing on defense you can’t break the film down. You can’t just know what one guy does, you have to know what all 11 players are doing. As far as drawing the plays and learning the playbook, I learned it all. I had no choice."


That $500 a month salary is roughly $22,000 per year these days. The QC job has become so important that even Special-Teams coordinators are asking for their own Quality-Control coaches, and QC coaches now have agents.

If Quality is Job One as the Ford Motor Company claims, The Quality Control Coach is an essential element to any NFL team.

 

 
 
 

 

Oh wait, nah bro.  Everyone got their way because they were given everything while denying others & they never deserved it by working hard or earning it.  You realize that everyone who has some sort of position of prominence or earned their title was only given it off the backs of those who are forever condemned in this country because the system is rigged.  LOL, unfortunately there’s a chance that there may be people on this very board who actually believe this though. :lol:

thanks for posting,  Very interesting for those of us who are willing to understand how hard work pays off.  Or who don’t buy into the fake narratives and the entitlement thingys.  Last weekend I ran across another unfathomable story of how no young people are willing to work.  We were wondering why a chair we ordered like 6 months ago hasn’t come in for delivery yet. All the stories of long lead times for raw materials and all that. Sure, but the latest delay is that they can’t find anyone to unload the trailer loads of furniture that came in from factories.  I’ve heard for over a year now how difficult it’s become to find young people willing to work.  They’re all choosing to see what else they can collect from their big daddy who owns them…the government!  Apparently the pay is like $22+ dollars/hour to work them trucks and yet young adults prefer to stay at home & collect less money sitting on their ***.Yikes!  

I took a day off a weekend ago so my wife & I could drive to the coast for a quick getaway.  Stopped off at the local Mickey D’s just for a cup of coffee as it was early in the morning & the drive thru was like 12 cars deep. Tried to park & go inside to get it but it was locked. I was told they couldn’t find enough help to work inside so it was drive thru only. WTH?

I would simply like to know if there is anyone on this board willing to admit they’re home collecting my hard earned tax dollars from Uncle Sam?  Please let me know.  I just want to ask you a few questions… thanks. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...