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Schedule makers screwed us in this aspect...


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18 minutes ago, ya_boi_j said:

I don't believe in it. Never have, never will

Statistically historically they say it's 3 points. I think it's less of a factor with games taking a more "casual" viewing aspect nowadays. With people cruising the stadium and watching fantasy on their phones. Not as big a deal for sure.

But you absolutely cannot tell me that home field played no role in the 2016 playoff run, the MNF game against Philly that year (2003?), and most of all, the '98 playoff game against San Fran. Every one of those were worth 5-6 points.

Edited by since68andcounting
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3 minutes ago, since68andcounting said:

Statistically historically they say it's 3 points. I think it's less of a factor with games taking a more "casual" viewing aspect nowadays. With people cruising the stadium and watching fantasy on their phones. Not as big a deal for sure.

But you absolutely cannot tell me that home field played no role in the 2016 playoff run, the MNF game against Philly that year (2003?), and most of all, the '98 playoff game against San Fran. Every one of those were worth 5-6 points.

I'm not trying to tell you anything my man. I just simply do not believe in it

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1 hour ago, RetroRoq said:

it doesnt work that way.  The PSL is the license for the seat rights.

If the Falcons have a home playoff game (which is basically an extra game), the PSL fee doesnt increase.  However you do retain your right to your licensed seat(s).

You still have to have tickets for every game in the Stadium.

The the PSL has always been something you pay before you can even buy tickets.

10 games? 9 games? 0 games? PSL doesn’t change.

A PSL is like lighting money on fire but without actually getting something useful, like warmth, in return.

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45 minutes ago, ya_boi_j said:

The better team wins on GameDay. It's that simple. There's not a thing in this world that will make me think otherwise. 

Well every now and then the better team slips up and just out and out chokes. Also every now and then REFS shaft a team. Also weather can also tip the scales in a teams favor. So I refuse to say the better team wins on game day. Maybe most of the time the best prepared team wins. Very hard to say every time the best team wins. You could maybe say the best team that day wins ever time. That does not make them the better team, just they had a better day.

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1 hour ago, LaurentRobinsonDaGawd said:

With 17 games becoming the new norm, its obvious we will have seasons with more road games than home games, and vice versa. 

The issue comes with our overseas game. If we are having scheduled 8 home and 9 road games(which is the case), than why the heck is the overseas game a "home" game, when were already behind the 8 ball in that category? Then throw in we have a VERY early BYE week, and thank god we have a favorable schedule to start strong hopefully. A strong start will dictate amy chance we have at returning to the playoffs in 2021. 

The Falcons have been just as good on the road as they are at home if not better the last 7 or so years. The Falcons haven't been a dominate home team since 2012.

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1 hour ago, ya_boi_j said:

The better team wins on GameDay. It's that simple. There's not a thing in this world that will make me think otherwise. 

Interesting. But being "better" is not an absolute thing or else there would never be upsets. So there must be variable factors that play into whether team "A" or team "B" is "better" on game day, such as overall player skill (subjective in and of itself, but at least somewhat observable), relative performance levels (as in, players don't play at exactly the same level every time they play - "Ryan was 'off' today!"), player error (Devonta Freeman whiffing that blitz pickup), outside interference (the refs blowing the call that led substantively to the Rams making the Super Bowl over the Saints), etc. Each factor plays a role and the weight of that role fluctuates so wildly that gambling is a very lucrative industry for bookies because people get it wrong the majority of the time.

The thing about "home field advantage" is that it's not objectively about location - rather, it's about emotion. The innate desire to "defend one's territory" (humans are territorial pack/tribal animals by nature), the roar of the crowd causing false starts and other performance errors by the visiting team, etc. Those are very real and quantifiable things in lots of areas in and out of sports - shoot, the board game Risk even codifies it by giving bonuses to defending armies against attackers. Saying home field advantage isn't real is effectively diminishing the impact of emotion on the game.

Asserting that if home field advantage was real, every team would be 8-8 is based on one of two assumptions: either that home field advantage is the ONLY factor or that it is one of many, but is an absolute in and of itself (which would be represented statistically by home teams having a 100% win rate but by varying point differentials as determined by the other, relative factors). Neither are verifiably true. There are cases where a team that has lost its quarterback and is playing a first-time starter (objectively "worse") against a team that was favored to beat them even WITH their starter and still won. 

I would suggest that home field advantage is one of many, MANY factors, but every bit as real and relative as the rest of them. When a crowd in Seattle is registering on the Richter Scale and the opposition false starts half a dozen times, that creates a material impact on the outcome. When the Falcons' crowd is late to the game and screwing around in the concourse after the game resumes from halftime and the opposition has no trouble hearing the snap count or playcall, that also has a material impact (though not as noticeable on the stat sheet). It's relative.

Interestingly, home teams finished below .500 for the first time in NFL history this past season (127-128-1) - when raucous crowds were not allowed in the buildings. Almost as if a factor that HAD been impacting results in a minor, but statistically significant way was removed, huh?

Also interestingly, the home team winning % has been declining in recent years - almost like teams are figuring out ways (like silent snap counts) to mitigate the impact of a factor that weighed against them. Why would they work so hard to mitigate something that doesn't actually exist?

You don't believe that home field advantage exists and are absolutely closed to evidence to the contrary - rock on, more power to you. But a LOT of people have gotten very rich believing something else and using the evidence to back it up.

Sorry for the long-winded post, but this was interesting and I've got a nasty case of the "Friday afternoon f--k its" at work.

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Have to correct one thing - there is a locational element to it as well. The position of the sun when playing in Miami combined with forcing away teams to wear dark jerseys. The field in Pittsburgh being notoriously bad and benefiting the team with experience dealing with it. But the physical elements are slowly being mitigated - artificial turf that is uniformly installed helps negate field issues. Improved cooling technology mitigates the Miami sun. 

In the long run, the emotional part may be the only part left! But still a factor!

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21 minutes ago, direwolf said:

Interesting. But being "better" is not an absolute thing or else there would never be upsets. So there must be variable factors that play into whether team "A" or team "B" is "better" on game day, such as overall player skill (subjective in and of itself, but at least somewhat observable), relative performance levels (as in, players don't play at exactly the same level every time they play - "Ryan was 'off' today!"), player error (Devonta Freeman whiffing that blitz pickup), outside interference (the refs blowing the call that led substantively to the Rams making the Super Bowl over the Saints), etc. Each factor plays a role and the weight of that role fluctuates so wildly that gambling is a very lucrative industry for bookies because people get it wrong the majority of the time.

The thing about "home field advantage" is that it's not objectively about location - rather, it's about emotion. The innate desire to "defend one's territory" (humans are territorial pack/tribal animals by nature), the roar of the crowd causing false starts and other performance errors by the visiting team, etc. Those are very real and quantifiable things in lots of areas in and out of sports - shoot, the board game Risk even codifies it by giving bonuses to defending armies against attackers. Saying home field advantage isn't real is effectively diminishing the impact of emotion on the game.

Asserting that if home field advantage was real, every team would be 8-8 is based on one of two assumptions: either that home field advantage is the ONLY factor or that it is one of many, but is an absolute in and of itself (which would be represented statistically by home teams having a 100% win rate but by varying point differentials as determined by the other, relative factors). Neither are verifiably true. There are cases where a team that has lost its quarterback and is playing a first-time starter (objectively "worse") against a team that was favored to beat them even WITH their starter and still won. 

I would suggest that home field advantage is one of many, MANY factors, but every bit as real and relative as the rest of them. When a crowd in Seattle is registering on the Richter Scale and the opposition false starts half a dozen times, that creates a material impact on the outcome. When the Falcons' crowd is late to the game and screwing around in the concourse after the game resumes from halftime and the opposition has no trouble hearing the snap count or playcall, that also has a material impact (though not as noticeable on the stat sheet). It's relative.

Interestingly, home teams finished below .500 for the first time in NFL history this past season (127-128-1) - when raucous crowds were not allowed in the buildings. Almost as if a factor that HAD been impacting results in a minor, but statistically significant way was removed, huh?

Also interestingly, the home team winning % has been declining in recent years - almost like teams are figuring out ways (like silent snap counts) to mitigate the impact of a factor that weighed against them. Why would they work so hard to mitigate something that doesn't actually exist?

You don't believe that home field advantage exists and are absolutely closed to evidence to the contrary - rock on, more power to you. But a LOT of people have gotten very rich believing something else and using the evidence to back it up.

Sorry for the long-winded post, but this was interesting and I've got a nasty case of the "Friday afternoon f--k its" at work.

No disrespect but I didn't read this. Me not believing in HFA is not this deep man. But plus 1

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2 hours ago, since68andcounting said:

Statistically historically they say it's 3 points. I think it's less of a factor with games taking a more "casual" viewing aspect nowadays. With people cruising the stadium and watching fantasy on their phones. Not as big a deal for sure.

But you absolutely cannot tell me that home field played no role in the 2016 playoff run, the MNF game against Philly that year (2003?), and most of all, the '98 playoff game against San Fran. Every one of those were worth 5-6 points.

This made me think of the NFC Championship game vs Green Bay with the hilarious quote from McCarthy "We ran into a Buzzsaw."

// Pulled from PFT article:
After losing the NFC Championship Game in Atlanta on Sunday, Rodgers said he wishes the team had played well enough for the entire regular season to get the NFC Championship Game at Lambeau Field.

“If this has taught us anything, it’s how important home-field advantage is,” Rodgers said. “We’ve played in three of these games, and they’ve all been on the road, and that’s just making it tough on yourself. Especially when the consequence is coming to a place like this, having to win here.”

______
IMO, it's got more to do with the mental aspect than the physical location. As a player, if you think you play better on a certain field then you are already showing up with that confidence of been there/done that. At least that's how it was for me playing sports. Doesn't even have to be your home field but think you have an advantage if your mindset is right.

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2 hours ago, falcndave said:

There are many examples in sports and elsewhere of "real" disadvantages being overcome. That doesn't mean they aren't real. Game location is only one factor, and its not that difficult to offset. It is, however, statistically real. 

Can y'all just accept that I don't believe in it and let it go 😂😂. It's really not this deep

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Homefield advantage matters but mostly from the context that teams lose a practice day when traveling. The league knew they were stiffing us but these things, they happen. Complaining won't make it better.

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3 hours ago, LaurentRobinsonDaGawd said:

With 17 games becoming the new norm, its obvious we will have seasons with more road games than home games, and vice versa. 

The issue comes with our overseas game. If we are having scheduled 8 home and 9 road games(which is the case), than why the heck is the overseas game a "home" game, when were already behind the 8 ball in that category? Then throw in we have a VERY early BYE week, and thank god we have a favorable schedule to start strong hopefully. A strong start will dictate amy chance we have at returning to the playoffs in 2021. 

Well at least we got one excuse lined up if we don't make the playoffs.  What are others?

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2 hours ago, HASHBROWN3 said:

This is the no excuses falcons... play the cards you're dealt, be thankful for everything including your challenges, and go do the best that you can.  

The "being screwed" mentality is not healthy in every facet of life & every industry or profession.  Easier said than done but it's true nevertheless.  Not a dig at OP, he was making an observation.  I just don't like the choice of words maybe.  

This has always been faulty logic hard work and a good attitude doesn't fix everything or guarantee success the universe is inherently random and sometimes you get the ***** and you are allowed to be pissed about it.  Not saying you can change it but sometimes it can be helpful to have a I got ****** over attitude because it inspires you that much more to overcome the BS.  The whole the cards your dealt thing isn't even true in poker as one of the most important skills is bluffing.  Applied to other situations you can "bluff" the system too I got pushed out of this department because so and so son got hired so now I'm gonna work so hard so and so son looks useless.  Sometimes rage and perceived  injustice can be just as motivating as a good old can do attitude.

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8 minutes ago, #84 said:

This has always been faulty logic hard work and a good attitude doesn't fix everything or guarantee success the universe is inherently random and sometimes you get the ***** and you are allowed to be pissed about it.  Not saying you can change it but sometimes it can be helpful to have a I got ****** over attitude because it inspires you that much more to overcome the BS.  The whole the cards your dealt thing isn't even true in poker as one of the most important skills is bluffing.  Applied to other situations you can "bluff" the system too I got pushed out of this department because so and so son got hired so now I'm gonna work so hard so and so son looks useless.  Sometimes rage and perceived  injustice can be just as motivating as a good old can do attitude.

I don’t have any quips about your statements buddy because sure, people do use it as motivation to propel themselves toward better things.  And those weren’t the people I was referring to obviously.

Problem is that a large majority of people who have the mindset I was referring to are stuck in this stinking thinking most of their lives & unless they begin making a choice to surround themselves with doers, it destroys them.  Spending their lives forever angry & blaming others for how chitty their circumstances are.

I am a huge fan of the human spirit & a soft place in my heart for those who’ve overcome great obstacles/ challenges in life my brother.  Life ain’t fkg fair & it never will be. 

 

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3 hours ago, ya_boi_j said:

Thats a perfect example of why I don't believe in home field advantage. If it was a real thing every team would have been going 8-8 every year. 

I understand what you are saying but home field advantage does not equal home field guarantee. I do think a HFA could give a slight advantage to the home team. But a good team will still beat a worse team even on the road. 

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1 hour ago, ya_boi_j said:

No disrespect but I didn't read this. Me not believing in HFA is not this deep man. But plus 1

None taken. Figured you wouldn’t - you made your stance clear. I just thought it was interesting and was a way to think about something other than work stuff! 😂

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6 minutes ago, FalconsFanSince194eva said:

I understand what you are saying but home field advantage does not equal home field guarantee. I do think a HFA could give a slight advantage to the home team. But a good team will still beat a worse team even on the road. 

So you're saying the better team on that Sunday will win without saying it?

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13 minutes ago, direwolf said:

None taken. Figured you wouldn’t - you made your stance clear. I just thought it was interesting and was a way to think about something other than work stuff! 😂

Yea when I saw it was longer than a paragraph it was a no go for me. Honestly, had I known you guys were going to take me saying that THAT serious, I would have just kept the thought to myself. Really wasn't looking for an in depth debate about that

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Some teams have a home field advantage, whether it's the crowd or the weather.  Who wants to play in Seattle or Green Bay?  Nobody.

We sure as shht dont have one in Atlanta though.  That's basically a neutral site every game.

 

 

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2 hours ago, ya_boi_j said:

Yea when I saw it was longer than a paragraph it was a no go for me. Honestly, had I known you guys were going to take me saying that THAT serious, I would have just kept the thought to myself. Really wasn't looking for an in depth debate about that

Yeah, didn’t think that one through. It’s the off-season post-draft. 

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6 hours ago, Snozberies17 said:

We definitely had a home field advantage in the Georgia Dome but not so much in the Benz stadium.

Only for a couple of years. Mostly, we weren’t that good.

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6 hours ago, #84 said:

Home field advantage is more than just fans.  It has to do with travel.  It's been proven time and time again that travel especially west to east is a huge disadvantage come game day.   More traveling also means less recovery time for our players.  Our training staff better be on it with 9 road games an international game and an early season bye our depth will be tested.  If we aren't properly prepared we could be running a MASH unit by years end.

We don't have a single set of consecutive Home games that hurts a lot because of the nature of travel.  It means less time to heal and work on other things.  Every other team in the division has the luxury of 14 straight days at home twice going into next year.  Add in an international game and a December road trip to Buffalo and its hard not to feel we got a little f***** by the schedulers

The most far away road game is San Fran. All of our road games are close to us. That is not going to be a major factor- Tampa, Carolina, New Orleans, Miami, NY, Buffalo, Jacksonville, and Dallas are all not that far from Atlanta. 

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