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Not Falcons related, but really sad news about Marty Schottenheimer


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Former NFL head coach Marty Schottenheimer moved to hospice facility, family says
ESPN

2:33 PM ET2 Minute Read
 

Former NFL head coach Marty Schottenheimer was moved to a hospice facility near his home in Charlotte, North Carolina, on Saturday because of complications from Alzheimer's disease, his family said Wednesday in a statement given to ESPN's Chris Mortensen.


He is listed in stable condition.

"As a family we are surrounding him with love," his wife, Pat, said in a statement, also speaking on behalf of the couple's children, Kristin and Brian, "and are soaking up the prayers and support from all those he impacted through his incredible life. In the way he taught us all, we are putting one foot in front of the other ... one play at a time."

Schottenheimer, 77, was diagnosed with Alzheimer's in 2014.

Schottenheimer, who coached the Browns, Chiefs, Washington and Chargers, posted a 205-139-1 career record, including the playoffs. He was named the NFL's Coach of the Year in 2004 with the Chargers. His NFL career ended in 2006 following a 14-2 season with the Chargers and a divisional-round exit from the playoffs.

Schottenheimer also played six seasons as a linebacker for the Bills (1965 to 1968) and Patriots (1969 to 1970).

His son, Brian, recently reached agreement to become the Jaguars' passing game coordinator, a source told ESPN's Adam Schefter.

 

https://www.espn.com/nfl/story/_/id/30827590/former-nfl-head-coach-marty-schottenheimer-moved-hospice-facility?platform=amp

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My father passed from dementia.  It is without a doubt the most cruel death for any one.  My dad did  not recognize me for several years at the end.  Or he would, but forget my name.  Starring at a picture of my mom, he asked me who she was.  They were married for 47 years.  

Losing your identity and world connections is brutal.  And cruel and the most unfair thing in life.  It is death encased in a thin veneer of life.  

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31 minutes ago, Herr Doktor said:

My father passed from dementia.  It is without a doubt the most cruel death for any one.  My dad did  not recognize me for several years at the end.  Or he would, but forget my name.  Starring at a picture of my mom, he asked me who she was.  They were married for 47 years.  

Losing your identity and world connections is brutal.  And cruel and the most unfair thing in life.  It is death encased in a thin veneer of life.  

had this discussion with my wife last year when her dad's mind started going with the onset of dementia. As much as we talked about her preparing herself, it just doesn't work that way. First time your dad doesn't know who you are, it's heartbreaking. 

there were times visiting him, he would recognize me and call my name right off. the next time, he'd talk to me just like before, only he'd wait till he thought I wasn't paying attention and ask my wife who I was. Then THAT day arrived he didn't know her. as much as she had told herself she was ready, of course she wasn't. 

I honestly don't wish this on anyone, at all

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1 minute ago, papachaz said:

had this discussion with my wife last year when her dad's mind started going with the onset of dementia. As much as we talked about her preparing herself, it just doesn't work that way. First time your dad doesn't know who you are, it's heartbreaking. 

there were times visiting him, he would recognize me and call my name right off. the next time, he'd talk to me just like before, only he'd wait till he thought I wasn't paying attention and ask my wife who I was. Then THAT day arrived he didn't know her. as much as she had told herself she was ready, of course she wasn't. 

I honestly don't wish this on anyone, at all

Sorry brother.  Its just heart breaking.  I found a scarf my dad loved.  Its from a soccer team he loved as a young airman in England.  It was dirty, so I washed it, using my own hands.  It crushed me to think I was washing any remnants of my dad off of it.  I had a good cry and even at 53, you are your dads son.  And it broke my heart.  Dementia and Alzheimers suck.  Bad.

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1 hour ago, Herr Doktor said:

My father passed from dementia.  It is without a doubt the most cruel death for any one.  My dad did  not recognize me for several years at the end.  Or he would, but forget my name.  Starring at a picture of my mom, he asked me who she was.  They were married for 47 years.  

Losing your identity and world connections is brutal.  And cruel and the most unfair thing in life.  It is death encased in a thin veneer of life.  

I sometimes wonder if it cruel to the people around the person with dementia instead of the person with dementia. My mother passed from a form of dementia in 2019. Most people with dementia have grey matter disease which destroys memories, who they are etc. my mother had the white matter version, which basically destroyed her ability to function so she became locked in before she passed.

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29 minutes ago, shc said:

I sometimes wonder if it cruel to the people around the person with dementia instead of the person with dementia. My mother passed from a form of dementia in 2019. Most people with dementia have grey matter disease which destroys memories, who they are etc. my mother had the white matter version, which basically destroyed her ability to function so she became locked in before she passed.

Brother I am so sorry.  Dementia is nothing short of straight evil.  My dad got clear at times, and would cry because he said he was still in there but sometimes could not think clearly and drifted away and not know what was happening or how to relate with us or even himself.  At the and, he forgot to eat, drink and eventually breathe.

Again brother, so very sorry.  We are always our parents children, no matter the age or distance.  Both my folks have passed and it seems unreal I cannot see them.  I am 53 and miss them like crazy.

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2 hours ago, papachaz said:

had this discussion with my wife last year when her dad's mind started going with the onset of dementia. As much as we talked about her preparing herself, it just doesn't work that way. First time your dad doesn't know who you are, it's heartbreaking. 

there were times visiting him, he would recognize me and call my name right off. the next time, he'd talk to me just like before, only he'd wait till he thought I wasn't paying attention and ask my wife who I was. Then THAT day arrived he didn't know her. as much as she had told herself she was ready, of course she wasn't. 

I honestly don't wish this on anyone, at all

I lived through the same.  The last year of my dad's life was spent in bed.  

My heart goes out to Marty and his family.  

"The Gleam"

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2 hours ago, papachaz said:

had this discussion with my wife last year when her dad's mind started going with the onset of dementia. As much as we talked about her preparing herself, it just doesn't work that way. First time your dad doesn't know who you are, it's heartbreaking. 

there were times visiting him, he would recognize me and call my name right off. the next time, he'd talk to me just like before, only he'd wait till he thought I wasn't paying attention and ask my wife who I was. Then THAT day arrived he didn't know her. as much as she had told herself she was ready, of course she wasn't. 

I honestly don't wish this on anyone, at all

Went through this with both parents. First my dad. He and I were always close, but near the end when I called him on the phone most times he had no idea who I was.

My mom had very severe short-term memory loss, so bad she would ask you a question, then a minute later ask you the same question, then again. It was about as traumatic experience as you can have.

Prayers and sympathy to Marty, his wife and children. He was lalways a class person in sports and life.

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Getting old is no fun for a lot of us. Arthritis, Alzheimers, Cancer... Seniors who have good health are truly blessed. 
 

May God bless this family and all families who are dealing with a loved one with disease. 
 

I had an Uncle who succumbed to Covid last week after battling cancer for 20 years. It’s truly sad thing to witness. 

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