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The Your 2021 World Series Champions Braves Thread


Mr. Hoopah!
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32 minutes ago, achilles return said:

in general terms? i would to to the causes of crime in society and work to fix or reduce them. it's not really rocket science - we have one of the highest rates of violent crime among wealthy, industrialized countries in the entire world. why?

i think it is quite demonstrable that our economic system has basically deemed significant portions of the labor force unnecessary, and so our response has been to just criminalize large swaths of the population whose existence we find burdensome. we have entire sections of this country where economic mobility through legal trade and employment is essentially impossible - is it any wonder that people turn to crime?  if hopelessness is your community's only commodity, why do we expect people to respect any sort of social contract? 

the proper response is complex and has to be multi-faceted. you're not going to fix it quickly, or easily. but here's a small list of extremely important public policy ideas that would go a long way to preventing hopelessness:

universal health care (including mental)

demilitarizing the police

ending the war on drugs

abolishing private prisons

transition our entire prison system from focusing on punishment to rehabilitation

Imagine what Universal Healthcare would do. 

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32 minutes ago, DonOfThemBirds said:

 

See!

 

Now this is the what the **** I call a discussion!!!

 

I agree, this will take a very long time strategically to overcome. There will always be bad and evil people, but we can at least steer a percentage of those people on the right path and it's a win.

 

Still don't understand how we can be the greatest country in the world and not have universal healthcare.

 

I work for myself and didn't pay out of pocket to get insurance right away once I left the foundry a few years ago and now I'm needing surgery for an abdominal hernia. I can't get the surgery until no earlier than January 1st of next year because the pre-existing insurance package isn't available until November 15th and won't go into affect until January 1st 2023. That sucks because I'll be in much pain until then.

 

They need to cut out all the deadline BS and make it easier for citizens to get the healthcare they need much sooner.

the other side of the equation is about opportunity. i think there's two forms of hopelessness that's been built up in our society from our economic policies, and they express themselves in two different ways - there's the kind of hopelessness that leads directly to criminal activity where portions of the population have basically become unemployable and thus cannot participate in legal trades anymore. this is concentrated on those in extreme poverty, where the path to prison is essentially a one-way street and it's basically unavoidable and nearly impossible to get out of.

the other kind of hopelessness comes from participation in our broken economy, but at the level where your exploitation is barely disguised - in my opinion, it's closely related to marx's theory of alienation  - whereas you are treated like a commodity instead of a person, and you are kept strictly separated from the products of your labor, but you are also poorly compensated, and there doesn't appear to be any growth in your economic future. i think this also can be exacerbated more recently because we're experiencing such strong generational differences in the economy - so many young people today have it worse than their parents did at the same age, and so it feels like our quality of life is on the decline.

in both cases, i think the causes and effects are systemic - in that this is shaped by how society is constructed, the rules we've chosen or have been chosen for us - and not expressively the fault of evil individuals. do evil people exist? sure, i guess. but i think people are fundamentally shaped into being by their material conditions, and i think we can see this in data. that means the solutions to these problems have to focus on large, systemic changes.

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11 minutes ago, achilles return said:

the other side of the equation is about opportunity. i think there's two forms of hopelessness that's been built up in our society from our economic policies, and they express themselves in two different ways - there's the kind of hopelessness that leads directly to criminal activity where portions of the population have basically become unemployable and thus cannot participate in legal trades anymore. this is concentrated on those in extreme poverty, where the path to prison is essentially a one-way street and it's basically unavoidable and nearly impossible to get out of.

the other kind of hopelessness comes from participation in our broken economy, but at the level where your exploitation is barely disguised - in my opinion, it's closely related to marx's theory of alienation  - whereas you are treated like a commodity instead of a person, and you are kept strictly separated from the products of your labor, but you are also poorly compensated, and there doesn't appear to be any growth in your economic future. i think this also can be exacerbated more recently because we're experiencing such strong generational differences in the economy - so many young people today have it worse than their parents did at the same age, and so it feels like our quality of life is on the decline.

in both cases, i think the causes and effects are systemic - in that this is shaped by how society is constructed, the rules we've chosen or have been chosen for us - and not expressively the fault of evil individuals. do evil people exist? sure, i guess. but i think people are fundamentally shaped into being by their material conditions, and i think we can see this in data. that means the solutions to these problems have to focus on large, systemic changes.

It should be noted HR/payroll companies now call it human capital management. They don’t even hide it anymore. 

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12 minutes ago, Tribal Chief said:

Where I'm from yeah. I don't know about other necks of the woods

 

Thought so. Growing up people who were known as queer was identified as gay where I came from as well.

 

What confused me nowadays was a person that used to work with identified himself as queer but yet had a wife and kids that he went home to. Tried to ask him doesn't he mean that he's bi, only for him to say that he's queer because he likes men along with women but he has some strong feminine ways.

 

I just said.......okay.

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41 minutes ago, Mr. Hoopah! said:

We have an access to guns problem and lack of mental health problem in this country. Turning the death penalty to 11 won’t stop a single shooting. 

While I do think we have a lack of mental health care, or healthcare in general, problem, it seems like that isn’t fair to say to all those people struggling with mental health issues that don’t go shooting up parades. This feels like more of an anger issue and people that don’t know how to manage it issue. 

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54 minutes ago, DonOfThemBirds said:

 

Thought so. Growing up people who were known as queer was identified as gay where I came from as well.

 

What confused me nowadays was a person that used to work with identified himself as queer but yet had a wife and kids that he went home to. Tried to ask him doesn't he mean that he's bi, only for him to say that he's queer because he likes men along with women but he has some strong feminine ways.

 

I just said.......okay.

I don't even try to understand people today. They don't even understand themselves 

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16 minutes ago, shc said:

While I do think we have a lack of mental health care, or healthcare in general, problem, it seems like that isn’t fair to say to all those people struggling with mental health issues that don’t go shooting up parades. This feels like more of an anger issue and people that don’t know how to manage it issue. 

I didn’t suggest that every person suffering from mental illness could commit a mass shooting. My point is that people like Crimo were failed by the system, which leads to horrific tragedies like yesterday. Let enforcement came and took knives and a sword from his home in 2019 after he made threats. That should have resulted in him given some sort of mental health evaluation and intervention. Instead he legally purchased a high powered rifle 3 years later. 

I’m not a doctor, I am in no way, shape, or form qualified to give this opinion, but it’s mine anyways: anyone who commits one of these mass shootings, planning to take as many innocent lives as possible, has some level of mental illness. They know right from wrong, they’re probably mostly capable of standing trial, but they still suffer from some type and level of mental illness. 

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1 hour ago, Mr. Hoopah! said:

I didn’t suggest that every person suffering from mental illness could commit a mass shooting. My point is that people like Crimo were failed by the system, which leads to horrific tragedies like yesterday. Let enforcement came and took knives and a sword from his home in 2019 after he made threats. That should have resulted in him given some sort of mental health evaluation and intervention. Instead he legally purchased a high powered rifle 3 years later. 

I’m not a doctor, I am in no way, shape, or form qualified to give this opinion, but it’s mine anyways: anyone who commits one of these mass shootings, planning to take as many innocent lives as possible, has some level of mental illness. They know right from wrong, they’re probably mostly capable of standing trial, but they still suffer from some type and level of mental illness. 

I didn’t mean my comment to say that You specifically, just that I think the general comments that point to mental health is t fair to others who suffer. I would agree wanting to kill someone should be considered a mental issue, but I feel like it’s more specific than that. 

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1 hour ago, shc said:

I didn’t mean my comment to say that You specifically, just that I think the general comments that point to mental health is t fair to others who suffer. I would agree wanting to kill someone should be considered a mental issue, but I feel like it’s more specific than that. 

If you don't think it's fair to say that it's a plethora of guns being available, and you don't think it's fair to say that it's a mental health epidemic.......where do you stand?

 

It seems fair to me to say that any person who goes out with the goal of killing as many people as possible, they do so, and then generally we follow that up with a history of violent behavior being reported....I mean it's fair to say that a lack of mental health treatment in America might play a big part here. That's a big part of most gun rights folks argument really.

 

I'm confused as to where exactly you stand. No setup, no argument.....I legitimately don't understand your position based off your recent posting.

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