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The Your 2021 World Series Champions Braves Thread


Mr. Hoopah!
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40 minutes ago, Mr. Hoopah! said:

700 people could raise hundreds of billions to improve the lives of the lower and middle class. They’ll fight it tooth and nail. 

 

The propaganda against this proposal is already rolling. I first saw it in the title of a news story that just mentioned that they were thinking of taxing unrealized gains without mentioning the net worth threshold and I've already seen people on IG making videos about this proposal without talking about the net worth part. Hopefully they can ram it through anyway.

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“I am a hunter -- and I think you should be hunted," a woman can be heard saying in a voicemail left for Arizona Secretary of State Katie Hobbs in September. "You will never be safe in Arizona again."

Or there's the man who spit, "Die you *****, die! Die you *****, die!" repeatedly into the phone, in another of several dozen threatening and angry voicemails directed at the Democratic secretary of state and shared exclusively with CNN by her office.

Officials and aides in secretary of state offices in Arizona and other states targeted by former President Donald Trump in his attack on last year's election results told CNN about living in constant terror -- nervously watching the people around them at events, checking in their rearview mirrors for cars following them home and sitting up at night wondering what might happen next. 

Law enforcement has never had to think much about protecting secretaries of state, let alone allocating hundreds of thousands of dollars in security, tracking and follow-up. Their jobs used to be mundane, unexciting, bureaucratic. These are small offices in a handful of states with enormous power in administering elections, from mailing ballots to overseeing voting machines to keeping track of counted votes. 

None were prepared to be publicly attacked. They don't have the budgets to monitor threats, and certainly not to suddenly protect officials who never had to be protected before. No systems were in place on the state or federal level to back them up, and the Department of Justice admits that the federal government doesn't yet have the infrastructure to handle the situation. 

Staff members in the offices say they're dealing with long-term emotional and psychological trauma after a year of constant threats -- in person and virtually -- to the secretaries and to themselves.

"Bullet," read one tweet reply to Colorado Secretary of State Jena Griswold, a Democrat, in September. "That is a six letter word for you." 

An email sent to her office over the summer read: "I'm really jonzing to see your purple face after you've been hanged."

Asked by CNN last week if she feels safe in her job and going about her days, Griswold paused for nearly 30 seconds before answering. 

"I take these threats very seriously," she finally said, choosing her words carefully. "It's absolutely getting worse," she added.

The threats come in from their home states and across the country. Few appear to be coordinated or organized, and are instead often driven by momentary, angry reactions to a news story or social media post. But some get very specific, citing details and specifics that leave the secretaries and their staff rushing to report them to authorities.

Most anticipate the threats will increase going into next year, with Republicans around the country making election doubt conspiracies a central plank of their campaigns, and with many of these secretaries of state up for reelection themselves in races that are already generating more attention than ever before, with expectations that they will be the frontlines of potentially trying to overturn the next presidential election. 

But Griswold's problem was, ironically, summed up in one of the tweets her office has tracked: "Your security detail is far too thin and incompetent to protect you. This world is unpredictable these days... anything can happen to anyone." It ended with a shrug emoji. Griswold's vulnerability is greater than that person imagined: for now, she's had to contract private security, and only for official events, squeezing the money out of her small office budget. With all that's been coming at her, that's what she has.

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7 hours ago, AF89 said:

Hmmmm

 

There could be at least a half dozen stills just like that from last night.  And the announcers were just calling the game as if it was legitimate or something.  HEY, there is a little square right there on the screen.  EVERYONE watching can see if the little ball is INSIDE the square or OUTSIDE the square.  If key pitches are clearly called the wrong way in favor of one team,  SAY SOMETHING!

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6 hours ago, falconsd56 said:

At the end of the day it did not matter but MLB HAS to go to the automated strike zone next year.

You can't have  that number of bad calls in a game of the final series of the year.

The replay system needs over hauling and so do the umps

 

Just so long as the strike zone can be modified for August double headers in 8-1 games . . . . 

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2 minutes ago, RandomFan said:

 

 

 

11 minutes ago, Leon Troutsky said:

“I am a hunter -- and I think you should be hunted," a woman can be heard saying in a voicemail left for Arizona Secretary of State Katie Hobbs in September. "You will never be safe in Arizona again."

Or there's the man who spit, "Die you *****, die! Die you *****, die!" repeatedly into the phone, in another of several dozen threatening and angry voicemails directed at the Democratic secretary of state and shared exclusively with CNN by her office.

Officials and aides in secretary of state offices in Arizona and other states targeted by former President Donald Trump in his attack on last year's election results told CNN about living in constant terror -- nervously watching the people around them at events, checking in their rearview mirrors for cars following them home and sitting up at night wondering what might happen next. 

Law enforcement has never had to think much about protecting secretaries of state, let alone allocating hundreds of thousands of dollars in security, tracking and follow-up. Their jobs used to be mundane, unexciting, bureaucratic. These are small offices in a handful of states with enormous power in administering elections, from mailing ballots to overseeing voting machines to keeping track of counted votes. 

None were prepared to be publicly attacked. They don't have the budgets to monitor threats, and certainly not to suddenly protect officials who never had to be protected before. No systems were in place on the state or federal level to back them up, and the Department of Justice admits that the federal government doesn't yet have the infrastructure to handle the situation. 

Staff members in the offices say they're dealing with long-term emotional and psychological trauma after a year of constant threats -- in person and virtually -- to the secretaries and to themselves.

"Bullet," read one tweet reply to Colorado Secretary of State Jena Griswold, a Democrat, in September. "That is a six letter word for you." 

An email sent to her office over the summer read: "I'm really jonzing to see your purple face after you've been hanged."

Asked by CNN last week if she feels safe in her job and going about her days, Griswold paused for nearly 30 seconds before answering. 

"I take these threats very seriously," she finally said, choosing her words carefully. "It's absolutely getting worse," she added.

The threats come in from their home states and across the country. Few appear to be coordinated or organized, and are instead often driven by momentary, angry reactions to a news story or social media post. But some get very specific, citing details and specifics that leave the secretaries and their staff rushing to report them to authorities.

Most anticipate the threats will increase going into next year, with Republicans around the country making election doubt conspiracies a central plank of their campaigns, and with many of these secretaries of state up for reelection themselves in races that are already generating more attention than ever before, with expectations that they will be the frontlines of potentially trying to overturn the next presidential election. 

But Griswold's problem was, ironically, summed up in one of the tweets her office has tracked: "Your security detail is far too thin and incompetent to protect you. This world is unpredictable these days... anything can happen to anyone." It ended with a shrug emoji. Griswold's vulnerability is greater than that person imagined: for now, she's had to contract private security, and only for official events, squeezing the money out of her small office budget. With all that's been coming at her, that's what she has.

Yeah, sure that may be wrong, but it’s no worse than Maxine Waters saying protestors need to be “more confrontational”.  

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22 hours ago, Mr. Hoopah! said:

Appears to be based on his affirmative defense of self defense.

We spend a lot of time ****ting on Florida, Arizona, Texas, and Virginia (which, let's be honest, is the worst ******* state of the union), but Wisconsin is underrated as an absolute ****hole of a state.

 

17 hours ago, falconsd56 said:

Isn't that illegal?

Because the people who were killed will be accused of crimes right?

So the judge is saying that those victims are criminals.

 

 

20 minutes ago, HolyMoses said:

Important thread on just that subject.  Broken:

 

I'd have to research whether it's actually not allowed under Wisconsin law, which I don't have time to do right meow.

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3 minutes ago, Leon Troutsky said:

Huh, funny how their story changes when they get behind closed doors…

 

True, but I think you are burying the lead.  He is reinforcing the Republican catch 22.  They can't win with Trumpism, but as soon as Republicans reject it, those folks will turn on them in an instant and they will lose any chance at viability.  

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5 minutes ago, Mr. Hoopah! said:

Eastman has been going around saying he didn't really mean the stuff he clearly wrote in the memo, and the Federalist Society said "**** yall for trying to censor him!"

Yep, but it’s funny that he’s saying publicly he didn’t mean it and then saying privately that it was “sound legal” reasoning, or whatever the phrase they used in the video.  

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20 minutes ago, Mr. Hoopah! said:

Eastman has been going around saying he didn't really mean the stuff he clearly wrote in the memo, and the Federalist Society said "**** yall for trying to censor him!"

I thought it was a given when the memo came out that he would eventually say that he didn't actually believe in it and it would be silly to take seriously. That's how you play :shrug:

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Just now, Gritzblitz 2.0 said:

Impressive that the Braves won so convincingly despite getting the Eric Gregg treatment. 

 

 

That is staggeringly bad. Like, one of the absolute worst umpire performances this year.  And it happened in a World Series.

 

Also, now 10 of 11 postseason games where the balls/strikes have gone in the Braves' opponents favor.

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