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The Futurama Appreciation Thread


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Fellas I'm fully vaccinated as of today.

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7 hours ago, MoeBiden said:

My sons tub overflowed and it’s raining in my office right now.  I’m thinking I should just snake out the closest toilet and I should be able to clear the drains.  I’m worried about the septic pump being bad as well.  @Sponge you have any advice?

I'd snake the closest toilet first. If you don't get any drainage then I'd have the septic tank drained. That's a good time to check the pump if the lifting rope is still attached. Ground the pump and listen for it spin. But if I had to guess, the tank is probably full or there's a clog in the line.

Cast iron sewage pipes will gunk up and leak over time. Look under the house for drips at the joints. Also take a hammer and tap the pipe to see if you can hear it go from solid ping to a hollow ping. You can pinpoint the clog. 

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1 hour ago, lostone said:

Finally caught up with this thread... took forever 

 

I still enjoy coding.  When I find an opportunity I go for it.  I just don’t do coding outside of work anymore.  I’m having to teach my group about writing clean maintainable code.  Since I’m somewhat new to the group, I just ask stupid questions like “how do I view the logs to see a transaction from start to finish across all services?” The answer to this made me sad btw... 

I have committed to learning angular this year.  I need to be able to be a “full stack developer” just in case

Clean code is why I hate coding. Well, the lack of it. I like everything organized, formatted, noted and readable. These fools will throw everything together in a goulash of code, and fall back on "it works".

The longer I'm in the industry, the more I get away from coding. I still do a fair bit, but not nearly as much as I used to.

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1 hour ago, Big_Dog said:

Michael Cohen will be called to testify in Trump's criminal cases involving the tax returns. He is so confident there will be a conviction he opened a website selling personalized orange prison jumpsuits. :slick:

Don't do that.

Never do that.

Yesterday, dude hit his drive to a green side bunker on a par four and says "Easy sandy!!"  (Making par from a sand trap pays a buck from everyone in our game)  My playing partner and I just look at each other.  Dude takes two to get out, three putts.  Double boagie.

Never do that.

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42 minutes ago, Optimus_Cr1m35 said:

Clean code is why I hate coding. Well, the lack of it. I like everything organized, formatted, noted and readable. These fools will throw everything together in a goulash of code, and fall back on "it works".

The longer I'm in the industry, the more I get away from coding. I still do a fair bit, but not nearly as much as I used to.

I saw the code and was like...  how do you understand what this is doing.  My old code almost no one had to ask me what it does.  I have to ask this all the time now.  Staring at code for an hour and going up and down then losing what you were doing because you went down a rabbit hole...

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4 minutes ago, lostone said:

I saw the code and was like...  how do you understand what this is doing.  My old code almost no one had to ask me what it does.  I have to ask this all the time now.  Staring at code for an hour and going up and down then losing what you were doing because you went down a rabbit hole...

Yup. Spend so much time trying to trace what it's doing that I end up getting interrupted and I have to start over. Drives me nuts.

 

The worst is when you start digging in, find something that makes you go "why is that in here?" Then you end up tracking down some nonsense that someone added for a "future enhancement" that never came to be...

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Senior Democrats are abandoning a backup plan to increase the minimum wage through a corporate tax penalty, after encountering numerous practical and political challenges in drafting their proposal over the weekend, according to two people familiar with the internal deliberations.

On Thursday, the Senate parliamentarian said that the $15-an-hour minimum wage included in President Biden’s $1.9 trillion stimulus plan was inadmissible under the rules Democrats are using to pass the bill through the Senate.

After that decision, Senate Finance Chair Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) and Senate Budget Chair Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) said they would instead seek to add tax penalties on large corporations that fail to pay $15 an hour — an idea viewed as less likely to be struck down by the parliamentarian and still helpful to some minimum-wage workers.

But now senior Democrats — including Wyden and Sanders — are walking away from that backup effort, according to two people who spoke on the condition of anonymity to share internal discussions.

 

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1 minute ago, Leon Troutsky said:

Senior Democrats are abandoning a backup plan to increase the minimum wage through a corporate tax penalty, after encountering numerous practical and political challenges in drafting their proposal over the weekend, according to two people familiar with the internal deliberations.

On Thursday, the Senate parliamentarian said that the $15-an-hour minimum wage included in President Biden’s $1.9 trillion stimulus plan was inadmissible under the rules Democrats are using to pass the bill through the Senate.

After that decision, Senate Finance Chair Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) and Senate Budget Chair Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) said they would instead seek to add tax penalties on large corporations that fail to pay $15 an hour — an idea viewed as less likely to be struck down by the parliamentarian and still helpful to some minimum-wage workers.

But now senior Democrats — including Wyden and Sanders — are walking away from that backup effort, according to two people who spoke on the condition of anonymity to share internal discussions.

 

Because it was never going to be feasible.

You can't fine a company for paying 11 a hour if the minimum wage is 11 a hour.

That would have been dead before it ever passed.

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Quote

...

Ault is one of millions in the United States facing a similar crisis. Household debt, which has been on the rise for the last decade, reached an astronomical $14.56 trillion at the end of last year. As rent and mortgage debt piles up, nearly a third of people in the country are at risk of eviction or foreclosure. While credit card debt, which is now at $820 billion, fell overall, in part due to a decline in spending, some 51 million people still saw it increase during the pandemic. Student loan debt, the second-biggest type of household debt after mortgages, continues to skyrocket, reaching nearly $1.6 trillion. 

...

The Biden administration has extended moratoriums on evictions and student loan payments, but these are postponements, not fixes. These debts will come due soon enough. The previous administration’s disastrous pandemic response, including delayed or never-received unemployment payments that left people without money for months, created catastrophe on the ground. In areas facing climate disasters, like Texas, residents are seeing enormously price-gouged utilities bills piled onto existing debts. And now, with tax season rolling in, people who did collect unemployment might be looking at surprise tax bills on their benefits. These are mounting crises coming to a head.

...

While the past year has been a nightmare, with no real end in sight, it has also forced a necessary conversation about our ideas and assumptions around debt. If millions of people had no hope of paying their bills before the pandemic, and millions more can’t pay now, how do we make sense of a system that cycles people through ever-increasing debt? The answer that many are reaching is that we can’t. The question that is now being asked, over and over again, isn’t how do we pay what we owe but rather: What does our government owe us, and how can we collect?  

For many people, this year has been defined not only by the pandemic itself but by the debt that has come with it. The average amount that someone behind on their rent now owes is $5,600, which is about four months’ total. A third of the stimulus checks issued by the government last March went directly to paying off debts, rather than on goods or services. Many who have been steadily accumulating unpaid bills over the past year are now looking at an impending crisis once the moratoriums are lifted. 

...

National household debt numbers, on their own, are so vast that they are rendered nearly meaningless; the massive figures also obscure the fact that debt in this country is distributed unequally. The character of debt in the U.S. is shaped by a history of discriminatory lending practices and disparities in generational wealth. Four years after graduation, Black borrowers hold nearly twice as much debt as their white counterparts; Black women hold an especially outsize portion of student debt. In 2016, the net worth of a Black family was 10 times less than that of a white household. 

But all of this translates acutely into people’s everyday lives. 

...The debt abolitionists I spoke to all agreed that canceling debt was only half of the battle—the systems that gave rise to the debt in the first place also need to be reformed. Abolishing student debt is paired with a demand for free public college; medical debt, with Medicare for All. When it comes to housing, nearly half of renters were cost-burdened—or spending more than 30 percent of their income on rent—before the pandemic even hit. Canceling rent is one necessity, but it’s clear that the country also desperately needs some kind of robust social housing reform. Representative Ilhan Omar introduced a bill last April that models a good step forward: canceling rent and mortgages, but also pairing a landlord relief fund with tenant protections, such as prohibiting rental increases for five years. Omar, rightly, called it Congress’s responsibility to “step in to stabilize both local communities and the housing market” in the face of the pandemic recession. 

...

 

 

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5 minutes ago, falconsd56 said:

If we take a wr at 4 and we have not signed 15 free agents filling all of the holes on the team then TF needs to be fired on the spot.

If Fields is gone, there's a good argument Chase is BPA at 4, although that mock also has Sewell there, and I would prefer to build in the trenches, but do we put him at RT or move Matthews there?

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@Sponge following on the discussion of service members KIA In the ME, I'm not sure if you've ever heard this song.  It's a great, heartbreaking, and very respectful song (while also questioning why the solider was sent there in the first place)

"Isbell wrote the song after hearing about the death of Marine Cpl. Matthew D. Conley, who was killed at age 21 in Iraq in February 2006 along with 2nd Lt. Almar L. Fitzgerald when their Humvee rode over an improvised explosive device. At the time of his death, Conley, who was a football star at the Alabama high school Isbell attended, had been scheduled to go home in a matter of weeks to be reunited with his wife, who was pregnant at the time with their first child.

“I knew Matt Conley not very well, he was a few years younger,” Isbell explained to Uncut magazine in 2014. “I was coming off a tour with the (Drive-By) Truckers, and I called my mom and she told me about his funeral, which she’d attended that day, and when I got home I wrote ‘Dress Blues’ in a time it takes to write it down on a piece of paper.”

“Dress Blues” segues between scenes from the hometown funeral procession held for Conley and the hypothetical scenes of his reunion with his family and friends that would have taken place in a fairer world. Isbell finds the telling details in both of these scenarios, details that only a fellow hometown boy would know, such as the “scripture on grocery store signs” or the party that would await his return: “You’d turn twenty-two and we’d celebrate you/ In a bar or a tent by the creek.”

Along the way, Isbell asks a series of questions of his former acquaintance. There is curiosity in Isbell’s tone, even a hint of wonder, when he poses the opening query, “What can you see from your window?” It morphs into concern when he asks, “Did you get your chance to make peace with the man/ Before he sent down his angels for you?” And, finally, a kind futile disgust arises when he asks his final question: “What did they say when they shipped you away/ To fight somebody’s Hollywood war?”

https://americansongwriter.com/dress-blues-jason-isbell-behind-the-song/

 

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