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The Braves Battle to the NLCS Thread


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20 minutes ago, AF89 said:

Weird that voting is a constitutional right unless you choose not to do it one cycle. (To my friends here who did not vote last election at least do a write in in the future or they will strip you of your right and **** you)

Actually, a ton of rightwingers will leap at the opportunity to tell you that voting is “a privilege, not a right” and that they don’t want certain people (“uninformed”, for example) voting in elections.  I’ve had people try to use this argument on me in person, not just online.

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Just open authoritarianism…

Republicans in Arizona have introduced a bill that would largely strip Katie Hobbs, the Democratic secretary of state, of her authority over election lawsuits, and then expire when she leaves office. And they have introduced another bill that would give the Legislature more power over setting the guidelines for election administration, a major task currently carried out by the secretary of state.

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This probably isn't going to be a popular opinion, but I really do hope we can figure out a way to get Myles Turner. I have been high on him since it was known that we needed a real Center. Collins + Capela has been clunky at best. Both have tried to make it work, but it hasn't been the perfect union. Collins numbers have taken a dip because of it and I think he is still not super comfortable with being forced to mostly be a wing. 

Myles Turner on the other hand is a great defender like Capela. Led the league in shot blocking. Can stretch the floor(30+% from 3), so Collins won't be forced to always be on the wing.  If the Pacers are going to be rebuilding, maybe we can get him with our first.  They both make similar amounts of money and have similar length contract, so it won't affect our long term salary cap much differently. 

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49 minutes ago, GEORGIAfan said:

This probably isn't going to be a popular opinion, but I really do hope we can figure out a way to get Myles Turner. I have been high on him since it was known that we needed a real Center. Collins + Capela has been clunky at best. Both have tried to make it work, but it hasn't been the perfect union. Collins numbers have taken a dip because of it and I think he is still not super comfortable with being forced to mostly be a wing. 

Myles Turner on the other hand is a great defender like Capela. Led the league in shot blocking. Can stretch the floor(30+% from 3), so Collins won't be forced to always be on the wing.  If the Pacers are going to be rebuilding, maybe we can get him with our first.  They both make similar amounts of money and have similar length contract, so it won't affect our long term salary cap much differently. 

Hes not a good rebounder which I'd say is Capelas second best trait. 

Wish Anthont Edward's had been a bust. 

KAT and Onyeka pairing>>>>>>

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31 minutes ago, WOR said:

Hes not a good rebounder which I'd say is Capelas second best trait. 

Wish Anthont Edward's had been a bust. 

KAT and Onyeka pairing>>>>>>

Is it that he isn't a good rebounder or like Collins he is playing next to a guy who needs to be near the basket to be effective, so he has taken a backseat. Sabonis is the star and Turner has had to fit around him. Same has been true for Collins who saw his 10+ rebounding average drop. With Turner, I believe we would see Collins numbers climb back up while also seeing Turners numbers jump because neither would be forced to be on the wing all the time. They can rotate and switch as needed. Turner average almost 11 rebounds against the Heat in last year's playoffs, so he has it in him.

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I do wish that more progressives and leftists would understand this idea…

In a provocative piece for The Democratic Strategist newsletter, political analyst Andrew Levison asks his fellow Democrats whether they agree with these three statements:

  • “It is entirely reasonable for progressives to insist on candidates who do not just agree to support certain progressive policies because they are required as part of participation in a political alliance but who fully and sincerely embrace basic progressive values.
  • “It is entirely reasonable for progressives to be suspicious of candidates who come from backgrounds and reflect the cultural outlook of communities that are culturally distant from the progressive world and culture.
  • “It is entirely reasonable for progressives to feel that non-progressive voters ought to be willing to support a progressive candidate if they agree with his or her economic platform even if they disagree with other aspects of his or her agenda.”

According to Levison, for most progressives, “these three statements seem entirely reasonable, indeed obvious. After all, why shouldn’t progressives have the right to demand candidates who sincerely support progressive views and reflect a progressive cultural outlook ...?"

Levison then turns the question on its head, with a second set of three statements:

  • “It is entirely reasonable for culturally traditional rural and white working class people to insist on candidates who do not just agree to support certain culturally traditional policies because they are required as part of participation in a political alliance but who fully and sincerely embrace certain traditional cultural values.
  • “It is entirely reasonable for culturally traditional rural and white working class people to be suspicious of candidates who come from backgrounds and reflect the cultural outlook of communities that are culturally distant from the rural and white working class world and culture.
  • “It is entirely reasonable for rural and white working class people to feel that voters who are not rural or white working class ought to be willing to support a culturally traditional rural or white working class candidate if they agree with his or her economic agenda even if they may disagree with some of his or her other views and proposals.”

As Levison puts it, “the underlying logic is identical in the two cases. Yet many progressives will agree with the first set of propositions but then reject the second.”

Just as many Republican members of the House and Senate representing mostly rural- and small-town-oriented states and districts cannot seem to understand the pressures and considerations of their colleagues in highly suburban districts, many Democrats seem blissfully unaware that some of their colleagues represent (or more accurately, used to represent) constituents who see life, politics, and policy somewhat differently.

https://cookpolitical.com/analysis/national/national-politics/democrats-double-standard

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On 6/17/2021 at 7:26 AM, WhenFalconsWin said:

OMFG, a reporter asked Biden a non-fluff question. What a F***in nightmare...:lol:

Sour puss Joe is going to have to grow thicker skin. He can't handle the pressure and never has been able to handle it. 

Dayum

 
 

Hey Dave Brown, do the letters FO mean anything to you?

@Big_Doghow was your trip?  Any luck with the ponies?

Just got back. Came back 2 days  early to get ahead of the tropical storm. Did lousy on the horses but at night I hit the slots and for once came out a wee bit ahead.

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1 hour ago, GEORGIAfan said:

Is it that he isn't a good rebounder or like Collins he is playing next to a guy who needs to be near the basket to be effective, so he has taken a backseat. Sabonis is the star and Turner has had to fit around him. Same has been true for Collins who saw his 10+ rebounding average drop. With Turner, I believe we would see Collins numbers climb back up while also seeing Turners numbers jump because neither would be forced to be on the wing all the time. They can rotate and switch as needed. Turner average almost 11 rebounds against the Heat in last year's playoffs, so he has it in him.

Myles had 2 years without Sabonis and was still averaging the same as after him. And the Heat aren't really a rebounding juggernaut lol. 

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4 minutes ago, WOR said:

Myles had 2 years without Sabonis and was still averaging the same as after him. And the Heat aren't really a rebounding juggernaut lol. 

The drop wasn't that big, but there was a drop and you are ignoring that we will unlock Collins again.  Collins can go back to being that 20-10 guy. Myles Turner knows McMillan's system. He was a DPOY candidate in that system.  

You are focused on rebounding like individual rebounding is the most important stat. No one wanted Drummond even though he was one of the best rebounder in the league.  Our team rebounding wouldn't take that great of a hit because Collins and other can pick up the slack, while we would get an even better rim and perimeter defender and someone who can make shots a the free throw and 3pt line.  

Plus Capela always gets exposed in the playoffs. Happened in Houston and now is happening here. 

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2 hours ago, Leon Troutsky said:

I do wish that more progressives and leftists would understand this idea…

In a provocative piece for The Democratic Strategist newsletter, political analyst Andrew Levison asks his fellow Democrats whether they agree with these three statements:

  • “It is entirely reasonable for progressives to insist on candidates who do not just agree to support certain progressive policies because they are required as part of participation in a political alliance but who fully and sincerely embrace basic progressive values.
  • “It is entirely reasonable for progressives to be suspicious of candidates who come from backgrounds and reflect the cultural outlook of communities that are culturally distant from the progressive world and culture.
  • “It is entirely reasonable for progressives to feel that non-progressive voters ought to be willing to support a progressive candidate if they agree with his or her economic platform even if they disagree with other aspects of his or her agenda.”

According to Levison, for most progressives, “these three statements seem entirely reasonable, indeed obvious. After all, why shouldn’t progressives have the right to demand candidates who sincerely support progressive views and reflect a progressive cultural outlook ...?"

Levison then turns the question on its head, with a second set of three statements:

  • “It is entirely reasonable for culturally traditional rural and white working class people to insist on candidates who do not just agree to support certain culturally traditional policies because they are required as part of participation in a political alliance but who fully and sincerely embrace certain traditional cultural values.
  • “It is entirely reasonable for culturally traditional rural and white working class people to be suspicious of candidates who come from backgrounds and reflect the cultural outlook of communities that are culturally distant from the rural and white working class world and culture.
  • “It is entirely reasonable for rural and white working class people to feel that voters who are not rural or white working class ought to be willing to support a culturally traditional rural or white working class candidate if they agree with his or her economic agenda even if they may disagree with some of his or her other views and proposals.”

As Levison puts it, “the underlying logic is identical in the two cases. Yet many progressives will agree with the first set of propositions but then reject the second.”

Just as many Republican members of the House and Senate representing mostly rural- and small-town-oriented states and districts cannot seem to understand the pressures and considerations of their colleagues in highly suburban districts, many Democrats seem blissfully unaware that some of their colleagues represent (or more accurately, used to represent) constituents who see life, politics, and policy somewhat differently.

https://cookpolitical.com/analysis/national/national-politics/democrats-double-standard

Is it entirely reasonable for rural and white working class people to support Trumpian politicians and also reject any inferences on what that indicates about their morality because that's how Trump fought the left? You're not really solving progressive intolerance by getting progressives to agree to the first three statements and then reject the second three if the second three inevitably lead to power-hungry monsters being elevated to the highest positions in government and then doing their part to solidify the permanent advantage of their party.

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I know a lot of people irl really respect Manchin because he believes in bipartisanship. Those probably aren't people who follow politics very closely, though. Progressives could learn to accept that many people don't follow politics close enough to have the right moral positions on stuff, but that's a different scenario than asking progressives to imagine that they're not accepting enough of rural and working class white people who support right-wing politicians who are openly hostile to anything and everything on the left because the progressive fails to realize that all political values informed by one's surroundings are equally valid.

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  • Mr. Hoopah! changed the title to The Braves Battle to the NLCS Thread

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