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The ABF Classic Film Series: The Deer Hunter (1978) Thread


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27 minutes ago, Big_Dog said:

Just saw on the news 35,000 R's have switched parties over the BS currently spewing from the once respected R Party. 

U of GA Just completed a poll and found Gov Kemp's popularity sunk from 51% to 47% and Overall Republican popularity is beginning to sink. The R's who are changing parties are for the most part switching to Independent.

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1 hour ago, GEORGIAfan said:

People don't like shopping for insurance, so while more competition is a good thing, I don't think it will have much effect. People mostly stick with the default. That is why I want us to have a public option with zero deductibles. Most people will have the public plan with maybe 10-20% of people on employer or personal private plans. 

They will start shopping around when they get a bill after they thought their deductible would cover payment. 

And to say that people don’t like it, doesn’t mean they won’t. And the insurance companies know it, that’s why they don’t want that option out there. 

I also think that it will lead to Medicare for all as folks will realize they have options. But even it doesn’t, having them compete to provide better services is a win.

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1 hour ago, Big_Dog said:

Just saw on the news 35,000 R's have switched parties over the BS currently spewing from the once respected R Party. 

I saw that as well. They have always been a party that couldn’t afford to loose voters as it will be harder to get them back as their positions are not as popular in general.

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1 hour ago, Ezekiel 25:17 said:

I just want healthcare to be NON employer based at the same or close to what we are paying now. 

Which would move us to a more free market system, where insurance companies would have to compete against each other, that physical conservatives claim they love so much! 

The problem isn't with the insurance companies having to compete with each other. They still have to compete with each other over employers. 

The problem is the insurance companies don't have bargaining power against hospitals and drug companies. Drug companies have patents on their products, meaning they face no competition. And insurance companies have to negotiate billing agreements with hospitals, but hospitals have a lot more leverage in that transaction. So premiums go way up simply because there's no way for insurance companies to bargain effectively.

The end solution here is going to be billing rate setting by the government in some form or another.  

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2021 is already worse than 2020. In addition to Waylon’s cancer and wife’s uncle (I thought they had already moved him to ICU, but they didn’t have a room available for him until yesterday) my wife’s best friend at work’s 2 year old nephew passed away at Children’s Hospital in Atlanta this morning. They don’t know what happened yet, he got really sick in the middle of the night Wednesday, the parents took him to the ER in the middle of the night and discovered when they got to the hospital that he had stopped breathing some time during the car ride. They almost lost him then, but got him stabilized. He apparently had several strokes from the oxygen loss to his brain and was brain dead.

We know the parents as well from our friend, I cannot even fathom their loss, it is absolutely devastating. Their little boy was precious. This is all so senseless. 

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I normally hate posting op-eds, but this one nails it...

But there’s a more fundamental question to ask here: What, exactly, could 10 Republican senators support?

Without an answer to that question, these GOP process objections are substantively meaningless. If 10 GOP senators won’t support some sort of package of aid, then it can’t pass. Even if Capito or Collins or a handful of others — say, those who negotiated the bipartisan package last time — are willing to support some sort of reasonable compromise, it still couldn’t pass.

Until we know that 10 GOP senators are willing to support something remotely close to what Biden and Democrats want, there simply isn’t anything to talk about. What’s the Republican plan? There isn’t one. With whom are Democrats supposed to negotiate? Over what, exactly?

Let’s go out on a limb and suggest that Republicans would like to keep things this way for as long as possible. They want the public debate to unfold in a place where they get to refrain from saying what they’re for — that is, refrain from saying what they’re prepared to concede to Democrats — while simultaneously attacking Democrats for not being willing to concede enough to them.

That’s a sucker’s game, and Democrats shouldn’t play it. Which is why Democrats appear to be preparing to use reconciliation.

The insight that voters will judge Democrats by the scale of what they deliver on, and not on whether they achieve bipartisan cooperation for its own sake, suggests Democrats have learned the lessons of 2009 and 2010.

It’s possible, of course, that objections from moderate Democrats will force down the size of the package. That would be a drag, but at least in that case, we’ll see actual negotiations, in which those moderates will be saying what they want, Biden and liberal Democrats will be insisting on more, and they’ll try to reach a compromise.

Thus far, nothing like this is unfolding from the GOP side. And Democrats seem to be acting accordingly.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2021/01/29/biden-reconciliation-gop-outrage/

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Also this...

“Our north star has to be the legislation itself,” Schumer said. “It has to be big, and bold, and strong.”

“It’s a different time — we’ve had the most authoritarian president around,” Schumer continued. Citing the storming of the Capitol, Schumer added: “The antidote is constructive, strong action by us — by the government.”

Schumer also noted that if Democrats succeed, future “appeals to bigotry and nastiness and divisiveness” will fail, because voters will say, “No. We’re making good progress.”

“I worry about the future of this democracy,” Schumer concluded, “if people continue to be disillusioned that this government can’t do a thing to make their lives better.”

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One of the things that I railed against in the Obama years was the GOP strategy of demanding concessions on major legislation and then voting against the bill anyway.  It’s like, “you must give us these concessions that you don’t want, and then we’re going to attack you and the legislation and vote against it en masse anyway.”

I was always of the mindset that you get concessions for your vote.  Don’t want to vote for it?  Going to obstruct and attack it?  Fine, then you get nothing.  

What the GOP was doing wasn’t compromising.  It wasn’t even negotiating.  It was making demands in bad faith knowing they were never going to support the final bill.  And now what the GOP is doing is even worse.  They’re not objecting to specific provisions (like raising the minimum wage) that they know are popular.  They’re saying, “the price is too high so YOU Dems must decide what popular provisions you’ll cut out.”  F*** that noise.  

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15 minutes ago, Leon Troutsky said:

One of the things that I railed against in the Obama years was the GOP strategy of demanding concessions on major legislation and then voting against the bill anyway.  It’s like, “you must give us these concessions that you don’t want, and then we’re going to attack you and the legislation and vote against it en masse anyway.”

I was always of the mindset that you get concessions for your vote.  Don’t want to vote for it?  Going to obstruct and attack it?  Fine, then you get nothing.  

What the GOP was doing wasn’t compromising.  It wasn’t even negotiating.  It was making demands in bad faith knowing they were never going to support the final bill.  And now what the GOP is doing is even worse.  They’re not objecting to specific provisions (like raising the minimum wage) that they know are popular.  They’re saying, “the price is too high so YOU Dems must decide what popular provisions you’ll cut out.”  F*** that noise.  

@Leon Troutsky getting more militant as the days go by

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Just now, lostone said:

@Leon Troutsky getting more militant as the days go by

:lol: 

But the reality is that I’ve always been in favor of hardball tactics when the other side is acting in bad faith.  Remember that I’m the one who said that Biden should appoint Susan Collins to a cabinet position, then let the Dems pick up that seat, and then fire her.  

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I would have liked for us to have been the ones to get Arenado, but I doubt we were ever really in on him. I'll only be upset if we sign a mid-level LF to a one-year deal and Ozuna signs a one-year deal somewhere else for six million more dollars than what our new LF signed for.

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3 hours ago, Defund the Mods said:

The problem isn't with the insurance companies having to compete with each other. They still have to compete with each other over employers. 

The problem is the insurance companies don't have bargaining power against hospitals and drug companies. Drug companies have patents on their products, meaning they face no competition. And insurance companies have to negotiate billing agreements with hospitals, but hospitals have a lot more leverage in that transaction. So premiums go way up simply because there's no way for insurance companies to bargain effectively.

The end solution here is going to be billing rate setting by the government in some form or another.  

That’s a another piece of the puzzle indeed! 

I know I gave a simplistic answer but what you bring up is something that would need to be addressed even with M4A. Medicine prices are out of this world to begin with and there has to be something in place most definitely! 

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14 minutes ago, Defund the Mods said:

Didn't we try this with Nolan when he was the DC? That defense was awful... 

Titans finished 12th in total defense in Pees’ last season in 2019 despite injuries to key starters. Also, Nolan is dumb. 

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16 minutes ago, Defund the Mods said:

Didn't we try this with Nolan when he was the DC? That defense was awful... 

**** we have tried that the last couple years.

 

Truth be told most defenses are multiple fronts in todays nfl.

No one really plays a strait 3-4 or 4-3 anymore.

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16 minutes ago, Mr. Hoopah! said:

Titans finished 12th in total defense in Pees’ last season in 2019 despite injuries to key starters. Also, Nolan is dumb. 

Hoping for the best here. But I can't help but wonder if the idea of blitzing a lot is meant to cover up a lack of talent in the secondary. Might work against some teams but smart, calm quarterbacks will eat that **** up. 

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  • Mr. Hoopah! changed the title to The ABF Classic Film Series: The Deer Hunter (1978) Thread

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