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Who would you pick for DC


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1 hour ago, Xfactor said:

Phillips first choice but he is 73

Ulbrich is 43 I’m not sold on him but could do worse

Alot of it will depend on the HC and his ties

 

 

Which is why I asked the question because this is what I see.

Smith: Pees

McDaniel: Phillips (maybe Zimmer)

Sirianni: Marinelli

Eberflus: Marinelli 

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Do you guys remember Steve Wilkes? He was defensive coordinator in Carolina during the Luke Kuechly/Josh Norman era and then he flamed out as a head coach in Arizona after that terrible Josh Rosen season. He has run a successful 4-3 scheme and is good coaching secondary. He's a free agent right now so it may be a good fit. Just a suggestion...

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Rex Ryan. As a HC he’s a complete failure. As a DC he gave QBs fits of rage.

That being said Ryan’s defense isn’t a plug and play. It’s a complicated defensive scheme that not every player can adjust to. It’s also a 46 hybrid defense.

https://bleacherreport.com/articles/1074050-nfl-defensive-schemes-the-basics-of-the-4-3-3-4-and-ryan-defenses

The Rex Ryan 3-4/4-3/46 Hybrid

Overview

Rex Ryan's defense isn't really a 4-3, nor is it really a 3-4. He runs a 46 hybrid like his father. The main difference in his 46 hybrid and his father's is the coverage responsibilities and the amount of blitzing.

Ryan's 46 package is one of the most complex schemes in the NFL. So this is a very simplified version of it.

The alignment is basically the same as the LeBeau 3-4 the entire way. The defensive line is in a traditional two-gap alignment with the nose tackle in a 0-tech over the center, and the DE's in 5-techs over the OT's.

The OLB's are on the LOS just outside of the OT's on each side. The WILB is shaded over the weak-side OG. The SILB is shaded over the strong-side "A" gap. The SS is about five yards off the LOS shaded over the OT behind the DE. The FS is in a 10-yard deep spot shaded across from the "A" gap on the weak side.

The corners are lined up traditionally in their spots across from the CB's. This is the same alignment as the 46 used by the '85 Bears, only LeBeau and Ryan execute it completely differently.

Defensive Line Responsibilities

The nose tackle is playing your pure 0-technique and is in charge of the "A" gaps, the DE's are in charge of the "B" and "C" gaps on the outside. In the passing game, their jobs are to control the line and draw double teams.

Linebacker Responsibilities

Much like the LeBeau scheme, the SS is in the box. Unlike the LeBeau scheme, however, the SS will drop back into deep coverage sometimes and will tend to blitz quite a bit as well. He will be in charge of cleaning up the strong side in the run game.

The strong-side OLB is in charge of the "C" gap and the outside in the run game and is used in man coverage over 80 percent of the time on the TE. The other 20 percent, he will be either blitzing or playing a mid zone.

The strong-side ILB is in charge of the "A" and "B" gaps on the right side in the run game. In the passing game, he will be covering a mid zone and rarely blitzing. The WILB is in charge of the "A" and "B" gaps on his side and will be blitzing over 50 percent in the passing game.

The other responsibility he will have is to play short to intermediate zones. The weak-side OLB will be blitzing over 75 percent regardless of the passing or running situation. When he isn't blitzing, he will be playing a contain on the outside for the run game or will be playing a flat zone on the weak side.

The scheme calls for a lot of overload blitzes to either side as opposed to the LeBeau scheme, which calls for balanced blitzes normally up the middle.

Secondary Responsibilities

Where in the LeBeau scheme, the corners play man with some zone, in the Ryan scheme, they will be in man coverage exclusively. And they will also be in a press-man. The FS will be patrolling the middle of the field in a deep zone exclusively.

The defensive schemes are all completely different in their execution, but as you could see, some of the alignments were the same from scheme to scheme. There are even some responsibilities that are the same from scheme to scheme. Also of note is how the defensive schemes are primarily Parcells 3-4 teams, Tampa/Cover 2 4-3 defenses and one-gap 4-3 defenses.

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19 minutes ago, Jpg428gggg said:

I actually don't mind keeping Morris as head coach and Ulbrich on the defensive side. Just need to clear house on the offensive side.

I would at least consider this. Not sure I would actually do it but I would give it a look. Koetter would have to go and a brilliant offensive mind would have to be brought in as OC. Otherwise I would say no. 

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2 hours ago, ATLSAGE said:

Do you guys remember Steve Wilkes? He was defensive coordinator in Carolina during the Luke Kuechly/Josh Norman era and then he flamed out as a head coach in Arizona after that terrible Josh Rosen season. He has run a successful 4-3 scheme and is good coaching secondary. He's a free agent right now so it may be a good fit. Just a suggestion...

He's already DC for the Browns. I dug the idea though.

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7 hours ago, ike barn87987 said:

If you could have Phillips, Pees, Marinelli, or Zimmer, who you got? Because I believe the next HC will be offensive minded but our biggest problem is on the defensive side. So I think one of these guys would be a good choice for DC.

Zimmer is the obvious choice.  But I also like Kris Kocurek cause his units have averaged nearly 40 sacks per year the last 10 years

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3 hours ago, Sidecar Falcon said:

Rex Ryan. As a HC he’s a complete failure. As a DC he gave QBs fits of rage.

That being said Ryan’s defense isn’t a plug and play. It’s a complicated defensive scheme that not every player can adjust to. It’s also a 46 hybrid defense.

https://bleacherreport.com/articles/1074050-nfl-defensive-schemes-the-basics-of-the-4-3-3-4-and-ryan-defenses

The Rex Ryan 3-4/4-3/46 Hybrid

Overview

Rex Ryan's defense isn't really a 4-3, nor is it really a 3-4. He runs a 46 hybrid like his father. The main difference in his 46 hybrid and his father's is the coverage responsibilities and the amount of blitzing.

Ryan's 46 package is one of the most complex schemes in the NFL. So this is a very simplified version of it.

The alignment is basically the same as the LeBeau 3-4 the entire way. The defensive line is in a traditional two-gap alignment with the nose tackle in a 0-tech over the center, and the DE's in 5-techs over the OT's.

The OLB's are on the LOS just outside of the OT's on each side. The WILB is shaded over the weak-side OG. The SILB is shaded over the strong-side "A" gap. The SS is about five yards off the LOS shaded over the OT behind the DE. The FS is in a 10-yard deep spot shaded across from the "A" gap on the weak side.

The corners are lined up traditionally in their spots across from the CB's. This is the same alignment as the 46 used by the '85 Bears, only LeBeau and Ryan execute it completely differently.

Defensive Line Responsibilities

The nose tackle is playing your pure 0-technique and is in charge of the "A" gaps, the DE's are in charge of the "B" and "C" gaps on the outside. In the passing game, their jobs are to control the line and draw double teams.

Linebacker Responsibilities

Much like the LeBeau scheme, the SS is in the box. Unlike the LeBeau scheme, however, the SS will drop back into deep coverage sometimes and will tend to blitz quite a bit as well. He will be in charge of cleaning up the strong side in the run game.

The strong-side OLB is in charge of the "C" gap and the outside in the run game and is used in man coverage over 80 percent of the time on the TE. The other 20 percent, he will be either blitzing or playing a mid zone.

The strong-side ILB is in charge of the "A" and "B" gaps on the right side in the run game. In the passing game, he will be covering a mid zone and rarely blitzing. The WILB is in charge of the "A" and "B" gaps on his side and will be blitzing over 50 percent in the passing game.

The other responsibility he will have is to play short to intermediate zones. The weak-side OLB will be blitzing over 75 percent regardless of the passing or running situation. When he isn't blitzing, he will be playing a contain on the outside for the run game or will be playing a flat zone on the weak side.

The scheme calls for a lot of overload blitzes to either side as opposed to the LeBeau scheme, which calls for balanced blitzes normally up the middle.

Secondary Responsibilities

Where in the LeBeau scheme, the corners play man with some zone, in the Ryan scheme, they will be in man coverage exclusively. And they will also be in a press-man. The FS will be patrolling the middle of the field in a deep zone exclusively.

The defensive schemes are all completely different in their execution, but as you could see, some of the alignments were the same from scheme to scheme. There are even some responsibilities that are the same from scheme to scheme. Also of note is how the defensive schemes are primarily Parcells 3-4 teams, Tampa/Cover 2 4-3 defenses and one-gap 4-3 defenses.

 

 

Rex doesn't want any DC jobs. He doesn't want to leave his job as an analyst unless it's for an NFL HC job.

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Folks I'd consider for DC assuming we were keeping the core group of players around (Grady, Debo, Foye, Fowler, Terrell):

George Edwards (former Vikings DC)
Edwards got his start in the college ranks, coaching at Duke, Georgia, and Florida. He has over 20 years of NFL coaching experience since then, most notably as the DC for the Vikings from 2014-2019.

Adam Zimmer (Vikes LB/co-DC)
Adam's likely not going anywhere unless his father gets fired. But should that happen, and assuming for whatever reason you couldn't get Mike Zimmer himself to be the DC here, getting his son Adam ain't a bad consolation prize. Adam spent a few years as an assistant for the Saints, Bengals, andChiefs before taking on the role of LB coach on his dad's staff back in 2014.

Andre Patterson (Vikes DL/co-DC)
He has a long history of coaching DL in both college & the NFL. Pete Carroll hired him back in '97 when he was w/ the Pats. He coached a few different NFL teams from then until 2007, when he took a year off to coach his son's high school team. He then coached at UNLV, UTEP, and FIU before returning to the NFL after being hired in 2014 by Mike Zimmer to coach the Vikings' DL.

Jay Rodgers (Bears DL, former DEN DL)
He's a very smart dude who is a former QB. He started his coaching career on the offensive side in the college ranks before coming to the NFL & switching over to defense. He helped Vonn Miller & co. do good things when he was with the Broncos, and has continued that with the Bears. He's had at least one Pro Bowler every season since he baden an NFL DL coach. He's the son of a coach, and his brother is also an NFL coach, so it seems to be in his genes. He learned at the NFL level under John Fox & Vic Fangio, and is likely ready to make the jump to DC.

Matt Patricia (Lions HC, former Pats DC)
If the Lions decide to let him go after this season, he could be a highly sought after, very intriguing DC candidate.
 

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