Jump to content

Who do you want to see as the Falcons offensive coordinator next year?


Recommended Posts

Who do you think is available that could get the best out of Matt Ryan and our offense next year? Help us have a more balanced attack that Matt Ryan is more suited for? 

I think Matt Ryan needs some weapons in the backfield like he did in 2016. And I think he needs to throw short to medium passes and rely on speed with the occasional deep throw. Especially as he gets older he needs to be schemed to be more protected.

I was thinking maybe Mike McDaniel but idk if he would be available unless it's a head coaching position. Maybe someone on the Packers coaching staff. Possibly even promote Gregg Knapp. What do you guys think? Who do you think would be the offensive coordinator that could make our offense feared again? 

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
46 minutes ago, Falcons Fan MVP said:

Who do you think is available that could get the best out of Matt Ryan and our offense next year? Help us have a more balanced attack that Matt Ryan is more suited for? 

I think Matt Ryan needs some weapons in the backfield like he did in 2016. And I think he needs to throw short to medium passes and rely on speed with the occasional deep throw. Especially as he gets older he needs to be schemed to be more protected.

I was thinking maybe Mike McDaniel but idk if he would be available unless it's a head coaching position. Maybe someone on the Packers coaching staff. Possibly even promote Gregg Knapp. What do you guys think? Who do you think would be the offensive coordinator that could make our offense feared again? 

 

 

 

Someone that will be allowed to install their own offense tired of this "Atlanta falcons offense" mess.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Whoever doesn't force a bunch of square pegs to fit in round holes like Dirk specializes in wherever he goes.

We all know the west style offense is where our offense hums. Outside zone, misdirection, creating mismatches, scheming guys open, bootlegs, stack concepts, quick throws/quick PA throws. presnap motions, totally different plays out of the same formation, creative redzone playcalling, and so on. We have gotten away from practically all of that since Dirk took over. At least Sark tried to play to our strengths. He was just in over his head. Give me someone that can play to the players' strengths and make their job easier instead of having to claw for every yard like we do in DIRK'S scheme. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
59 minutes ago, Osiruz said:

Mike McDaniel or Mike Lefleur. 

I have been on the McDaniel wagon. However, Aikman's comments last night really did give me pause. Basically he said one of the reasons that Brady wanted to go to TB is that Arians looks downfield first then works the progression back toward the LOS. However, McDaniel teaches to look for the short quick release throw first, then work downfield in your progressions. 

The problem with the later approach in the NFL is that you'll seldom have time to make it 3 or 4 deep into your progression to find a deep target. If you favor an offense that looks like the Cardinals last week, then McDaniel's is a great choice. Basically use the short passing game as an extension of the running game and go on long methodical drives while hoping a penalty or negative play don't put you behind the sticks. It can work, but you need a disciplinarian HC and a machine like Brady to consistently pay off that approach. No mistakes allowed. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, dapanch420 said:

mike mcdaniel would be a smooth tranistions considering we're already trying to run what theyve perfected up in san fran. hes also familiar with top talent on offense.

 

1 hour ago, Osiruz said:

I'd be Ok with that, he's been with Shanahan for a while and knows how the offense works. 

 

1 hour ago, mtldirtybird said:

Mike Lafleur might very well go to the Packers to be OC for his big bro Matt. We would have to make him HC to get him. 

That would be Arthur Blank publicly admitting that they messed up not promoting Kyle as head coach Matt LeFleur as OC

Link to post
Share on other sites

Joe Brady as HC & OC

If he is the next offensive savant as it seems, you’ve got an innovative HC who is just 31 years old.  Bring Kocurek as DC and let’s roll

 

'D-line junkie' Kris Kocurek the force behind 49ers' relentless unit

Published: Jan 31, 2020 at 01:53 AM
 
Link to post
Share on other sites

Joe Brady does lots to make the QB’s job easier pre-snap.  Koetter doesn’t believe in such novel ideas

 

 

Panthers’ Joe Brady shows creative use of empty formations

USATSI_14927800.jpg

How Panthers OC Joe Brady worked Oakland's defense with empty formations

Many football watchers were excited to see former LSU passing game coordinator Joe Brady make the move back to the NFL to take over as the offensive coordinator for the Carolina Panthers. Last year, Brady was partly responsible for one of the nation’s best passing games, and the rise of No. 1 overall pick and current Cincinnati Bengals passer Joe Burrow. While the Panthers lost his first game as an NFL OC (he was an offensive assistant with the Saints from 2017-18), Brady’s creative use of empty formations is a road map to how the Panthers are going to attack defenses.

This started early in their loss to the Raiders. Take this play, a 1st and 10 early in the contest. Quarterback Teddy Bridgewater aligns in the shotgun with the backfield empty. The Panthers have three receivers to the left – including running back Christian McCaffrey who aligns as the inner-most receiver – and two to the right:

BradyImage1.jpg

If you look at the defensive alignment before the play, Bridgewater can be fairly confident, even without motion, that the Raiders are in zone coverage. The safeties are about 15 yards off the line, the cornerback to the left is in a zone alignment, and the linebacker nearest McCaffrey is not right over him, but shaded to the inside of him. Knowing this, Bridgewater can assume that that linebacker is going to open to the three-receiver side at the snap. That is what happens in zone alignments, and with McCaffrey to that side, it is even more of a likelihood.

So Bridgewater turns at the snap to throw the slant to the right, away from the linebacker drop:

The empty formation combined with McCaffrey’s alignment gives the quarterback information before the play, so he knows where to go with the football.

This completion from late in the first half. is another example of Brady using formations creatively to give his quarterback presnap clues. This time the Panthers start in an empty formation before bringing McCaffrey back into the backfield. In response, the cornerback who was over the RB simply slides, rather than trailing him. Bridgewater now knows the Raiders are in zone coverage. He makes a check at the line of scrimmage, and then works a concept in the middle of the field to Anderson with the receiver sitting down in a soft spot in the zone coverage:

Again Bridgewater gets information thanks to how the formation forces a defensive response. Only this time the defense is responding to a shift away from an empty alignment, to a more traditional 3×1 formation.

USATSI_14927790.jpg

(Bob Donnan-USA TODAY Sports)

Here is another example of a similar line of attack. The Panthers face a 3rd and 8, and start with an empty formation. McCaffrey again aligns to the outside, this time on the right. But he will shift into the backfield, and on this play the defender over him, linebacker Cory Littleton, trails him. So now Bridgewater knows the Raiders are in man coverage. He again makes an adjustment at the line of scrimmage, and when the ball is snapped he throws the out route to the left side of the formation, a perfect choice to attack this Cover 1/man free coverage scheme:

Let’s look at one more example of this in action, only this time with the offense shifting to empty before the play. Late in the third quarter the Panthers faced a 3rd and 8, with the Raiders leading 27-15. They start with running back Mike Davis in the backfield, but he will shift outside to the left, giving the Panthers two receivers to the right and three to the left side of the formation. In response, the defense simply slides the defenders rather than having someone trail Davis.

Meaning they are playing zone coverage.

Bridgewater does not make any adjustments before the snap, as he must have liked what the Panthers had called against this. You can probably see why:

They run a perfect concept to beat the zone coverage, with Anderson running a vertical route working from left to right and across the free safety’s face, and D.J. Moore running a deep dig route. Davis runs a quick pivot route. The free safety has to maintain depth as the last line of defense, and the pivot route underneath open up a huge throwing lane for the dig route.

While the Panthers were on the losing end of the final score, Brady’s creative use of formations and personnel gave the Raiders a lot to think about, while also giving quarterback Teddy Bridgewater a ton of information before each play. The Tampa Bay Buccaneers’ defense is going to have its hands full on Sunday with these designs from the new offensive coordinator.

 
 

 

 

 

 
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, falcndave said:

I have been on the McDaniel wagon. However, Aikman's comments last night really did give me pause. Basically he said one of the reasons that Brady wanted to go to TB is that Arians looks downfield first then works the progression back toward the LOS. However, McDaniel teaches to look for the short quick release throw first, then work downfield in your progressions. 

The problem with the later approach in the NFL is that you'll seldom have time to make it 3 or 4 deep into your progression to find a deep target. If you favor an offense that looks like the Cardinals last week, then McDaniel's is a great choice. Basically use the short passing game as an extension of the running game and go on long methodical drives while hoping a penalty or negative play don't put you behind the sticks. It can work, but you need a disciplinarian HC and a machine like Brady to consistently pay off that approach. No mistakes allowed. 

We already look downfield first. Koetter runs deep patterns. One of our problems is that our OLine can’t protect long enough for those to develop and the other is Matt isn’t the best deep passer. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, FalconsIn2012 said:

Joe Brady as HC & OC

If he is the next offensive savant as it seems, you’ve got an innovative HC who is just 31 years old.  Bring Kocurek as DC and let’s roll

 

'D-line junkie' Kris Kocurek the force behind 49ers' relentless unit

Published: Jan 31, 2020 at 01:53 AM
 

I like it but the article says one of the reasons his D Line loves him is that they know he has no aspirations to be a DC or HC

Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, marvinthemartian said:

We already look downfield first. Koetter runs deep patterns. One of our problems is that our OLine can’t protect long enough for those to develop and the other is Matt isn’t the best deep passer. 

Most people on these boards prefer an "aggressive" OC. Just pointing out McDaniel is the opposite of that. Not that it can't work, but you have to be spot on to make it work. That's all. It is a zero tolerance approach. You have to bring in an entire staff of that mindset if you want to go that way. Personally, I don't have an opinion. I just realized that McDaniel is high risk approach for an organization with an "all gas, no brakes" mindset. It would be a "blow it up" move.  

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...