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Urban Dictionary refers to that as the “Leon Troutsky”.

Oh my goodness I hope this will be true universally.  

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When coronavirus cases began increasing in Coeur d’Alene, Idaho, in late July, Pastor Paul Van Noy prayed with his congregation that the city council would not pass a mask mandate.

“I don’t want to be told I have to wear a mask,” he said at the lectern. “We’re adults and we don’t need the government to tell us what to do.”

A little over a month later, he and his wife contracted the virus and he has landed in the hospital’s intensive care unit struggling to breathe, he said in a statement this week.

“I haven’t taken this Covid seriously enough,” his wife, Brenda, said on Facebook Sept. 4, shortly after her husband was admitted to the ICU.

...  

In his sermons and Facebook posts, Van Noy argued that while the coronavirus pandemic was not a hoax, hospitalization and case numbers were being inflated by unnamed people with “agendas.” He shared a post that urged his followers to “open up your businesses, churches, and homes.” He spread false statements suggesting masks are not effective at preventing coronavirus from spreading and claiming that asymptomatic infections are rare.

“If you are still living in fear, don’t be,” an Aug. 14 post said.

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A former Nashville, Tennessee, council member, who believed the threat of the coronavirus was being radically overblown, died from complications from Covid-19, officials said Monday.

The man, Tony Tenpenny, died over the weekend after more than five weeks in the hospital fighting the virus that has sickened more than 6.8 million people in the U.S. and killed at least 200,000 others, Nashville Vice Mayor Jim Shulman said.

Tenpenny made more than a dozen posts stating or sharing Covid-19 disinformation, including video from a Texas doctor who peddled dangerous theories about the virus, linking its cause to demons. Facebook flagged the July 29 posing by Tenpenny as "Partly False Information."

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JFC we cannot catch a break.

A new COVID-19 mutation appears to be even more contagious, according to a study — and experts say it could be a response by the virus to defeat masks and other social-distancing efforts.

Scientists in a paper published Wednesday identified a new strain of the virus, which accounted for 99.9 percent of cases during the second wave in the Houston, Texas, area, the Washington Post reported.

The paper, which has not been peer-reviewed, said people with the strain, known as the D614G mutation, had higher loads of virus — suggesting it is more contagious.

Though the strain isn’t more deadly, researchers said it appeared to have adapted better to spread among humans.

David Morens, a virologist at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said the findings suggest that the virus may become more contagious and that this “may have implications for our ability to control it.”

He said it’s possible that the virus had evolved to resist efforts such as hand-washing and social distancing.

“Wearing masks, washing our hands, all those things are barriers to transmissibility, or contagion, but as the virus becomes more contagious, it statistically is better at getting around those barriers,” Morens told the newspaper.

 

 

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1 hour ago, WhenFalconsWin said:

JFC we cannot catch a break.

A new COVID-19 mutation appears to be even more contagious, according to a study — and experts say it could be a response by the virus to defeat masks and other social-distancing efforts.

Scientists in a paper published Wednesday identified a new strain of the virus, which accounted for 99.9 percent of cases during the second wave in the Houston, Texas, area, the Washington Post reported.

The paper, which has not been peer-reviewed, said people with the strain, known as the D614G mutation, had higher loads of virus — suggesting it is more contagious.

Though the strain isn’t more deadly, researchers said it appeared to have adapted better to spread among humans.

David Morens, a virologist at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said the findings suggest that the virus may become more contagious and that this “may have implications for our ability to control it.”

He said it’s possible that the virus had evolved to resist efforts such as hand-washing and social distancing.

“Wearing masks, washing our hands, all those things are barriers to transmissibility, or contagion, but as the virus becomes more contagious, it statistically is better at getting around those barriers,” Morens told the newspaper.

 

 

Mutations.

This is why a vaccine might not be a sure thing.

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8 hours ago, WhenFalconsWin said:

JFC we cannot catch a break.

A new COVID-19 mutation appears to be even more contagious, according to a study — and experts say it could be a response by the virus to defeat masks and other social-distancing efforts.

 

 

 

Not really that unusual halfway through a pandemic. What’s most important is how dramatically the death rate has spiraled downward  all-the-while most lockdowns have been lifted.

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6 minutes ago, Vandy said:

Not really that unusual halfway through a pandemic. What’s most important is how dramatically the death rate has spiraled downward while most lockdowns have been lifted.

It hasn't "spiraled downward".  It's only down slightly from a few weeks ago and we're still losing about 700-800 people every day from it.  That's equivalent to a 9/11 every 4-5 days.  

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28 minutes ago, Vandy said:

Not really that unusual halfway through a pandemic. What’s most important is how dramatically the death rate has spiraled downward  all-the-while most lockdowns have been lifted.

Unfortunately winter is coming.

The case numbers are shooting up in other countries as well as across the US and also unfortunately increases in the numbers of deaths tend to lag several weeks behind.

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2 hours ago, Sun Tzu 7 said:

Unfortunately winter is coming.

The case numbers are shooting up in other countries as well as across the US and also unfortunately increases in the numbers of deaths tend to lag several weeks behind.

Yeah Tzu, I’m not saying # of deaths will be going down, and you’re right, winter season is coming so cases and thereby deaths could go up as well,,,, plus we’re (at least, historically for pandemics) not even at the halfway point in dealing with this mess.
 

.....but the rate of deaths continuing to come down is a critical factor in getting to the other side of this.....which it obviously is.


https://ourworldindata.org/coronavirus-data-explorer?zoomToSelection=true&time=2020-03-14..latest&country=~OWID_WRL&region=World&cfrMetric=true&interval=total&aligned=true&hideControls=true&smoothing=0&pickerMetric=location&pickerSort=asc

 

image.jpeg

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On 9/25/2020 at 1:57 PM, Vandy said:

Yeah Tzu, I’m not saying # of deaths will be going down, and you’re right, winter season is coming so cases and thereby deaths could go up as well,,,, plus we’re (at least, historically for pandemics) not even at the halfway point in dealing with this mess.
 

.....but the rate of deaths continuing to come down is a critical factor in getting to the other side of this.....which it obviously is.


https://ourworldindata.org/coronavirus-data-explorer?zoomToSelection=true&time=2020-03-14..latest&country=~OWID_WRL&region=World&cfrMetric=true&interval=total&aligned=true&hideControls=true&smoothing=0&pickerMetric=location&pickerSort=asc

 

image.jpeg

Yes. Then coming down is critical.

Question. Did the rate of deaths come down before they spiked in the summer?

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2 hours ago, Sun Tzu 7 said:

Yes. Then coming down is critical.

Question. Did the rate of deaths come down before they spiked in the summer?

By far the biggest decline was May/June after the initial surge, which is typical. A slow downward grind since then.

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17 hours ago, Vandy said:

By far the biggest decline was May/June after the initial surge, which is typical. A slow downward grind since then.

Bro, read a graph.  Deaths spiked to record highs from July-September and have only started coming down the last few weeks.
 

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/us/georgia-coronavirus-cases.html

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5 hours ago, Leon Troutsky said:

 Bro, read a graph.  Deaths spiked to record highs from July-September and have only started coming down the last few weeks.
 

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/us/georgia-coronavirus-cases.html

LOL @ you telling me to read graphs.  Analyzing data ands graphing the results is a major part of what I do for a living. 
 

yes, deaths went up Because the number of cases went up, which was predictable as they had to open economies back up. This is consistent with previous pandemics of 1957-58 and 1968-69. But as I said, the rate of death (which is what Tzu and I were discussing) continues to overall eck down, and will continue to do so as medical teams evolve with their increased knowledge in better treatments of the disease. Which again, is consistent with other pandemics.

 

https://ourworldindata.org/coronavirus-data-explorer?zoomToSelection=true&time=2020-03-14..latest&country=~OWID_WRL&region=World&cfrMetric=true&interval=total&aligned=true&hideControls=true&smoothing=0&pickerMetric=location&pickerSort=asc

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2 hours ago, Vandy said:

LOL @ you telling me to read graphs.  Analyzing data ands graphing the results is a major part of what I do for a living. 
 

yes, deaths went up Because the number of cases went up, which was predictable as they had to open economies back up. This is consistent with previous pandemics of 1957-58 and 1968-69. But as I said, the rate of death (which is what Tzu and I were discussing) continues to overall eck down, and will continue to do so as medical teams evolve with their increased knowledge in better treatments of the disease. Which again, is consistent with other pandemics.

 

https://ourworldindata.org/coronavirus-data-explorer?zoomToSelection=true&time=2020-03-14..latest&country=~OWID_WRL&region=World&cfrMetric=true&interval=total&aligned=true&hideControls=true&smoothing=0&pickerMetric=location&pickerSort=asc

I'm on mobile but is there a way to break that down to just the US? I don't see the option for that. I'd like to see how much Italy influences that graph. The virus hit different parts of the world at different times and that's going to make a dramatic difference in any graph when it comes to death rates on a global scale.

 

Also improvements in testing would dramatically lower the death rate.....I mean in fact we know it would.

 

It's why deaths per day still feels like the correct number to go by for me as far as the US. There's just so many variables you can go by with any other measurement but deaths per day......the other variables go out the window and that's a final number that variables don't really matter in when determining where we're at as far as where we are at in this stage of a pandemic.

 

 

 

I've stated multiple times that I hate calculating the cost (human, economic, and I guess  emotional is the right word) but at the end of the day if I'm gonna judge where we are in it......number of deaths per day is where I'm looking.

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2 hours ago, Vandy said:

LOL @ you telling me to read graphs.  Analyzing data ands graphing the results is a major part of what I do for a living. 
 

yes, deaths went up Because the number of cases went up, which was predictable as they had to open economies back up. This is consistent with previous pandemics of 1957-58 and 1968-69. But as I said, the rate of death (which is what Tzu and I were discussing) continues to overall eck down, and will continue to do so as medical teams evolve with their increased knowledge in better treatments of the disease. Which again, is consistent with other pandemics.

 

https://ourworldindata.org/coronavirus-data-explorer?zoomToSelection=true&time=2020-03-14..latest&country=~OWID_WRL&region=World&cfrMetric=true&interval=total&aligned=true&hideControls=true&smoothing=0&pickerMetric=location&pickerSort=asc

Also this is a direct quote from your article here.

 

"During an outbreak of a pandemic the CFR is a
poor measure of the mortality risk of the disease."

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Jdrizzle said:

I'm on mobile but is there a way to break that down to just the US? I don't see the option for that. I'd like to see how much Italy influences that graph. The virus hit different parts of the world at different times and that's going to make a dramatic difference in any graph when it comes to death rates on a global scale.

 

Also improvements in testing would dramatically lower the death rate.....I mean in fact we know it would.

 

It's why deaths per day still feels like the correct number to go by for me as far as the US. There's just so many variables you can go by with any other measurement but deaths per day......the other variables go out the window and that's a final number that variables don't really matter in when determining where we're at as far as where we are at in this stage of a pandemic.

 

 

 

I've stated multiple times that I hate calculating the cost (human, economic, and I guess  emotional is the right word) but at the end of the day if I'm gonna judge where we are in it......number of deaths per day is where I'm looking.

That’s fine, we look at a lot of things through different prisms. But in a country of 330 million where nearly 3 million die a year from various causes, it’s not where im looking.

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Just now, Vandy said:

That’s fine. But in a country of 330 million where nearly 3 million die each from various causes, it’s not where im looking.

So you're gonna look at a global chart that doesn't take into account where and how the virus hit, testing dramatically improving, and give all the downswing to improvements in care.......

 

 

 

That's stupid Vandy. If you judge numbers, stats, and placing it onto a graph for a living.......well that's just stupid. Variables don't matter y'all.

 

 

 

 

 

Seriously......with what you said before now and what you said now........that's just being hard-headed and only arguing from one side and you know it.........that's stupid.

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5 minutes ago, Jdrizzle said:

So you're gonna look at a global chart that doesn't take into account where and how the virus hit, testing dramatically improving, and give all the downswing to improvements in care.......

 

 

 

That's stupid Vandy. If you judge numbers, stats, and placing it onto a graph for a living.......well that's just stupid. Variables don't matter y'all.

 

 

 

 

 

Seriously......with what you said before now and what you said now........that's just being hard-headed and only arguing from one side and you know it.........that's stupid.

Just because I don’t agree with your false narrative In here doesn’t make me stupid. Frankly, resorting to that childishness with people who have different views just makes you look small.
 

Good night.

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