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MayorWest13

2020 NFL DRAFT | FORMER ALL-PRO CB ANTONIO CROMARTIE EVALUATES A FEW OF THE DRAFT’S BEST CB PROSPECTS

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https://www.cover1.net/2020-nfl-draft-former-all-pro-cb-antonio-cromartie-evaluates-a-few-of-the-drafts-best-cb-prospects/3/

Videos in the link 

We discussed five cornerbacks for this interview in Jeff Okudah (Ohio State), CJ Henderson (Florida), Kristian Fulton (LSU), Trevon Diggs (Alabama) and Jaylon Johnson (Utah). For each one of these clips, Cromartie details what he sees with his initial reaction. We then talk about other aspects of the play. His commentary will be in italics while my comments will be in bold under each clip.

Jeff Okudah, Ohio State

 

AC: “So first off, you have to look at his footwork throughout the entire thing. He’s staying square and never gets his hips turned throughout the entire thing. He’s got that kick-step and he’s able to gain ground at the same time while keeping the receiver in front of him. Also, look where the receiver started. He’s on top of the numbers then ends up outside of the numbers by almost 3 yards. He is still able to stay square the entire time. The whole thing about playing that position that Okudah understands so well is that he’s staying square and making sure he can control the receiver and he didn’t even have to use his hands much until the top of the route.”

ZH: “The thing that really stands out to me is his feet here. His feet are very calm and he’s not taking too many steps or over committing. How important is that for a corner to be square and adjust the receiver but also to do that with calm and confident feet?”

AC: “Honestly it’s just about patience. Receivers are gonna dance and they can do things to try and make you jump inside or jump outside but it’s just about having patience. If you know the route combination and what is coming then it makes it a whole lot easier. When you are able to play at a high level with high confidence then it doesn’t matter who the receiver is or what he does. When you look at Jeff and what he does, when he’s in press or off, he understands what offenses are giving him and for me that is what separates him from everybody else. He is very technically sound, has a very high football IQ, and it shows week in and week out.”

ZH: “Yeah, and honestly you could say that about all the Ohio State cornerbacks and how they are taught with Damon Arnette and Shaun Wade in the slot as well. I just love his feet here and how he is able to redirect while taking so little steps.”

AC: “The feet and eyes are the most important things for a corner. The more you can do with that, the easier you can move around and control the receiver, put him where you want to put him, and go from there.”

 

“The only thing I would take away here is I would love for him to take another shuffle step to the inside because if he takes another shuffle step to the inside, he gets his hands on the receiver and is able to control him. So he wouldn’t be in that trail position anymore, he’d be sitting right there on the inside shoulder of the receiver. That’s the only thing I would take away from it, he made a great play on the ball coming back in and slicing the ball. He knows he has safety help over the top so he can take those chances. His poise at the top of the route is amazing. He’s so poised and relaxed at the top that he’s breaking with the receiver at the same time to be able to undercut it.

He trusts the guys around him too. When you play that corner position, you have to know where everybody is. When you know where everybody is, you learn how to play football a lot better. We always said understand your good help and your bad help. The good help is your safety that’s coming down and the bad help is a linebacker dropping to you because those guys are run reading first so you have to play tighter coverage and play on top of the route. When you look at Jeff over the season when he’s playing certain coverages, he understands that. He knows where everybody is going to be so he can play a lot more aggressively in certain coverages. He’s not a super-fast guy, he’s a 4.5 guy, he’s a guy that understands his limits and he understands what he can do and what he cannot do.”

ZH: “Absolutely. I can’t think of anything to really add to that. I guess I want to ask you with your experience which you prefer. We see Okudah get his hands on guys at the line in man to re-direct routes at times and other times he will mirror without using his hands. Do you prefer corners to use their hands at the line?”

AC: “Initially, no. I was a guy who was motor mirror. I honestly didn’t start getting my hands on guys until I was traded to New York. It was more like ‘Hey you gotta use your bigger frame so get your hands on these guys and control them with that’ so that is when I started doing that.”

ZH: “So that is when you started getting into the step-kicking and such. Did you ever do that before you got there?”

AC: “I was but playing this position is a chess game. You don’t always want to have to put your hands on a guy. You want him to think you’ll always put your hands on him and mess up his timing. It is a mental game out there and you don’t want to play checkers out there while somebody else is playing chess. You want to have that chess match every single down. What’s my next move or what’s his next move? It’s picking up on little things like what routes he runs in motions or certain alignments that makes you play things differently and to get in tuned to what is going on so you can outplay him before the play even starts.”

C.J Henderson, Florida

 

AC: “Honestly this is just me and I’m a hard scout, this is terrible technique. Just from the simple fact that if this guy runs a post, he’s running away from him. Look where Henderson starts. He starts on top of the numbers and ends up 2-3 yards outside the numbers. Now he makes a great play on the ball but that ball should have been picked off. You want to be able to still play technique sound and be on top of that because if this guy runs a post, he’s running away from you. Your safety is going away from you, so if you are going to open up like that, you better make a play on it every time. If I’m teaching a guy what not to do, this is something I’m telling them not to do.

He made a helluva play on the ball but I think he should have picked it off. That’s not a ball you bat down; you gotta go up and pick that ball off. The top guys that we are talking about today, that’s what I don’t see from them a lot. They don’t take the ball away from guys. Picking this ball off changes the game and gives your offense momentum in a big game. He has to play better technique because in the NFL he won’t get away with that. Everyone runs 4.3.”

ZH: “Yeah, it’s a weird play too because he retreats off the line and then backs up outside the numbers basically opening up to the inside when he doesn’t have any help there.”

AC: “He zone turns instead of man turns.”

ZH: “How would you prefer him play that route there. With no safety help over the top, you’d rather him take away the inside right?”

AC: “If I knew my inside help was coming from my down safety, I’m gonna play outside leverage because if he runs a slant or a dig or anything, that safety is going to slide right underneath it. I’m going to play head up and a little bit outside and press him inside. I don’t want to open the gate that gives him 30 yards of open run. If you do that in the NFL, coaches are gonna see that in the both and they are gonna start running routes away from you.”

“He’s just doing his job on this one. He stays square, shuffles his feet. [Ja’Marr] Chase is really not running any type of route. He’s running a route we used to call star pass which is a 4-6-3 with him running a stop route or a dig or a flat route to the bottom. Basically he makes a great play on the ball that he should make on that ball because the receiver is being lazy in his route running.”

ZH: “Henderson is a bit of a polarizing prospect because he has all the skill and athleticism you want but the technique and other aspects aren’t really there. What is your overall opinion of his game?”

AC: “Honestly, he’s the most athletic DB in the draft that I’ve seen. Athleticism is through the roof but the only con I have on him is I don’t think he knows what he’s playing half the time. I need to see better technique because you can only get away with so much with your athletic ability playing at the NFL level. You have to be technically sound and understand what guys are giving you so you know what to take away.”

Kristian Fulton, LSU

 

ZH: “One thing I want to say before I let you talk about this play, I love Fulton’s mindset. He’s going against this 4.2 receiver and he doesn’t back down and gets right in his face.”

AC: “I think it’s great and he’s playing to his ability. What he does best is he presses. The only thing I would take away from it is I’m not going to lung at a guy who runs 4.2. I’m going to be patient and contact him at the line and then go from there. I think he makes a heck of a play on the ball and he’s doing what he’s supposed to do. He’s staying in the hip pocket and doing what he’s supposed to do.”

ZH: “One reason I’m just so high on him is the confidence he has. How much do you like that confidence to still get in the face of a player who he is much slower than in Ruggs.”

AC: “You want your corner to play with confidence. If he’s not gonna play with confidence, he can’t play. I love the fact that he’s going up there and challenging a guy in a big game like this. You have to go up there and challenge those guys. It’s the best of the best going at it and you have to just play football.”

“My only takeaway here would be not to catch himself. He shuffles outside and stops his feet and then goes again. I don’t know if you see that but that is why the receiver got on the outside of him. If he shuffles his feet all the way through, the receiver has to come back inside and if the ball is thrown back-shoulder then he gets an easy interception.”

ZH: “So you want him to essentially keep that shuffle at the line and not stop at the contact point?”

AC: “Yeah, because if he keeps his feet shuffled, it’s a possibility that he gets the receiver out of bounds. If you can get the receiver out of bounds, the play is over with. Overall, he’s playing great defense though. He is in the receiver’s hip pocket and using the sideline to pinch him out of bounds.”

Trevon Diggs, Alabama

 

AC: “This right here is exactly what you want. The guy gives him a stutter go — it wasn’t a great stutter go — but Diggs stay in the up-field shoulder and goes up and attacks the football. You can’t ask for anything more from a guy who does that. He went up and made a play on the ball that was not intended to be made a play on. He made a heck of a play for his defense. Just look at it. He sinks when the receiver sinks, he looks back when the receiver looks back, and he got his eye on the ball. He’s playing through the receiver and plays up to the ball. Most DBs would turn their backs to the receiver and the receiver would give them a nudge and catch the ball for a touchdown. He’s playing through the receiver and playing through his hands to get the interception.”

ZH: “He never loses track of the receiver here which is huge. As someone who has done it at a high level like you did, what are you looking at to know when to turn around and make a play?”

AC: “You just play the receiver, honestly. His hands and eyes are gonna tell you everything. When the ball is coming, a receiver’s eyes get big. Once you see that, you gotta flip your head around as quickly as possible and try to make a play on the ball.”

He does a great job of widening the receiver. Look where the receiver starts compared to where he ends up outside of the hash on top of the numbers. I’d rather for him to go up and get that football because in the NFL, guys are gonna go up and go get it. He may be on Sportscenter if he don’t go up and attack that ball in the air. Great technique though and great finish and that’s all you can ask for. He basically ran the route for the guy. These two clips you have on here of Diggs, he ran the route for the receiver both times.”

 

ZH: “What are your overall thoughts on him? Like Henderson, he is a bit of a polarizing prospect in this draft class.”

AC: “I think he had an overall great year but I would like to see more from him. That is mostly due to the fact that he is new to the position. When they got into the big games late in the year, I didn’t see that playmaking ability. I thought I was gonna see a little more from him when he played guys from LSU but I didn’t see that. For me, I’d like to see him step up bigger in bigger ball games. He’s a helluva playmaker, he just has to have confidence in himself to go out and go do it.”

Jaylon Johnson, Utah

 

ZH: “This is actually an interesting coverage here from Utah, as Johnson starts in press and then he gets outside and gets into trail technique.”

AC: “I’m going to tell you what coverage they are playing right now: They are playing a soft-two trail. So you see where the safeties are and you see the corners are playing outside and underneath. They are basically playing a two-man from outside. If this were quarters, the safety would have drove on this crossing route. Both corners are playing outside and attacking underneath, so you are basically looking at a softcover two outside leverage with the corners attacking underneath.”

 

ZH: “Considering that coverage and technique they are playing, what do you think of this rep from Johnson?”

AC: “His closing speed is what’s remarkable. He’s playing outside leverage and driving on an inside breaking route, so just showing that closing speed is what’s great. If it was a better throw it would probably be a catchable ball but as a DB we would always say that a play has got to be made no matter how it is made and no matter what, we got to get the ball on the ground. I actually love this kid. I started watching him a year ago because one of my guys who coaches at Utah told me to start watching him and I started analyzing him. I like the kid and I like the way he plays and he’s gonna be a good one at the next level.”

ZH: “Those Utah players are coached so well and they have so many good players at that program. Johnson certainly is one of my favorites and why I included him in this piece.”

 

“So this last clip is interesting to me because fade routes are so popular near the goal line and, to me, Johnson plays this perfectly. Would you say this is great technique when covering a fade route?”

AC: “Oh, this is perfect technique. This is textbook technique. This is staying square and being able to control the man and feel the fade route. He understood exactly what was coming but not only look at that but look at where No. 11 is dropping. That linebacker is dropping, so Johnson understands that he has outside leverage and that he has a dropper that is going to be in the slant window so he doesn’t need to run there. This is what I mean by understanding where you are and who you are playing with. If I don’t have slant responsibility, why am I going to cover the slant? I’m going to do my responsibility and expect my teammates to do their job. The technique though here — you can’t get any better than that. I wish he would have got the pick though. I know it was overthrown but if he gets the pick, that is textbook all the way around.”

 


ZH: “We got to do more of these then for sure. Maybe we’ll do a zoom meeting or something for YouTube and talk some corner play. To close out this interview, and I know we can probably all answer this based on what you have said in this interview, but what would you say are the most important traits a DB has to have to be successful in the NFL?”

AC: “Hey, it’s no problem! We could talk another hour about this stuff man. Everyone has been asking me to analyze DBs and I hate to do it because I’m too hard but man I just love talking ball. And absolutely man, just let me know and we’ll do more of this. For me though, you have to have good feet and a high football IQ. You can have everything else like strength or playmaking and such but having that IQ and good feet are the foundation to being a good NFL cornerback. I personally know a ton of scouts are big on football IQ and technique for the NFL.”

 

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8 minutes ago, GATXBOI said:

Good read... how high are y'all on Henderson now

Not very.  If he has terrible technique, he could get better, but you'd think he would have worked some of his technique issues out by now. Is it the coaching he has received, or is he hard headed, and uncoachable?

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21 minutes ago, GATXBOI said:

Good read... how high are y'all on Henderson now

Our staff is really high on athleticism but with this appearing to be a make or break year I'm curious if the approach changes to more football ready picks. 

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50 minutes ago, GATXBOI said:

Good read... how high are y'all on Henderson now

I have never been high on him for this reason. You need to be athletic to be a DB, but a lot comes down to technique and not wasting steps. Understanding where you have help and playing accordingly. Give me a guy who plays with great technique over a great athlete any day of the week. People don't understand how complex it is to play db in this league.

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48 minutes ago, Francis York Morgan said:

Got a feeling Cromartie would love Bryce Hall too.

And regarding JJ's speed @vel, a 4.5 isn't unworkable. He accelerates well and moves super well for a guy his size imho

Oh very true. Not a big knock. I just thought he was faster. He has very few flaws in my opinion. Complete safety. 4.5 speed and shoulder injuries are my only knocks. But he can be a CB1 day one in ATL. 

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3 hours ago, MayorWest13 said:

https://www.cover1.net/2020-nfl-draft-former-all-pro-cb-antonio-cromartie-evaluates-a-few-of-the-drafts-best-cb-prospects/3/

Videos in the link 

We discussed five cornerbacks for this interview in Jeff Okudah (Ohio State), CJ Henderson (Florida), Kristian Fulton (LSU), Trevon Diggs (Alabama) and Jaylon Johnson (Utah). For each one of these clips, Cromartie details what he sees with his initial reaction. We then talk about other aspects of the play. His commentary will be in italics while my comments will be in bold under each clip.

Jeff Okudah, Ohio State

 

AC: “So first off, you have to look at his footwork throughout the entire thing. He’s staying square and never gets his hips turned throughout the entire thing. He’s got that kick-step and he’s able to gain ground at the same time while keeping the receiver in front of him. Also, look where the receiver started. He’s on top of the numbers then ends up outside of the numbers by almost 3 yards. He is still able to stay square the entire time. The whole thing about playing that position that Okudah understands so well is that he’s staying square and making sure he can control the receiver and he didn’t even have to use his hands much until the top of the route.”

ZH: “The thing that really stands out to me is his feet here. His feet are very calm and he’s not taking too many steps or over committing. How important is that for a corner to be square and adjust the receiver but also to do that with calm and confident feet?”

AC: “Honestly it’s just about patience. Receivers are gonna dance and they can do things to try and make you jump inside or jump outside but it’s just about having patience. If you know the route combination and what is coming then it makes it a whole lot easier. When you are able to play at a high level with high confidence then it doesn’t matter who the receiver is or what he does. When you look at Jeff and what he does, when he’s in press or off, he understands what offenses are giving him and for me that is what separates him from everybody else. He is very technically sound, has a very high football IQ, and it shows week in and week out.”

ZH: “Yeah, and honestly you could say that about all the Ohio State cornerbacks and how they are taught with Damon Arnette and Shaun Wade in the slot as well. I just love his feet here and how he is able to redirect while taking so little steps.”

AC: “The feet and eyes are the most important things for a corner. The more you can do with that, the easier you can move around and control the receiver, put him where you want to put him, and go from there.”

 

“The only thing I would take away here is I would love for him to take another shuffle step to the inside because if he takes another shuffle step to the inside, he gets his hands on the receiver and is able to control him. So he wouldn’t be in that trail position anymore, he’d be sitting right there on the inside shoulder of the receiver. That’s the only thing I would take away from it, he made a great play on the ball coming back in and slicing the ball. He knows he has safety help over the top so he can take those chances. His poise at the top of the route is amazing. He’s so poised and relaxed at the top that he’s breaking with the receiver at the same time to be able to undercut it.

He trusts the guys around him too. When you play that corner position, you have to know where everybody is. When you know where everybody is, you learn how to play football a lot better. We always said understand your good help and your bad help. The good help is your safety that’s coming down and the bad help is a linebacker dropping to you because those guys are run reading first so you have to play tighter coverage and play on top of the route. When you look at Jeff over the season when he’s playing certain coverages, he understands that. He knows where everybody is going to be so he can play a lot more aggressively in certain coverages. He’s not a super-fast guy, he’s a 4.5 guy, he’s a guy that understands his limits and he understands what he can do and what he cannot do.”

ZH: “Absolutely. I can’t think of anything to really add to that. I guess I want to ask you with your experience which you prefer. We see Okudah get his hands on guys at the line in man to re-direct routes at times and other times he will mirror without using his hands. Do you prefer corners to use their hands at the line?”

AC: “Initially, no. I was a guy who was motor mirror. I honestly didn’t start getting my hands on guys until I was traded to New York. It was more like ‘Hey you gotta use your bigger frame so get your hands on these guys and control them with that’ so that is when I started doing that.”

ZH: “So that is when you started getting into the step-kicking and such. Did you ever do that before you got there?”

AC: “I was but playing this position is a chess game. You don’t always want to have to put your hands on a guy. You want him to think you’ll always put your hands on him and mess up his timing. It is a mental game out there and you don’t want to play checkers out there while somebody else is playing chess. You want to have that chess match every single down. What’s my next move or what’s his next move? It’s picking up on little things like what routes he runs in motions or certain alignments that makes you play things differently and to get in tuned to what is going on so you can outplay him before the play even starts.”

C.J Henderson, Florida

 

AC: “Honestly this is just me and I’m a hard scout, this is terrible technique. Just from the simple fact that if this guy runs a post, he’s running away from him. Look where Henderson starts. He starts on top of the numbers and ends up 2-3 yards outside the numbers. Now he makes a great play on the ball but that ball should have been picked off. You want to be able to still play technique sound and be on top of that because if this guy runs a post, he’s running away from you. Your safety is going away from you, so if you are going to open up like that, you better make a play on it every time. If I’m teaching a guy what not to do, this is something I’m telling them not to do.

He made a helluva play on the ball but I think he should have picked it off. That’s not a ball you bat down; you gotta go up and pick that ball off. The top guys that we are talking about today, that’s what I don’t see from them a lot. They don’t take the ball away from guys. Picking this ball off changes the game and gives your offense momentum in a big game. He has to play better technique because in the NFL he won’t get away with that. Everyone runs 4.3.”

ZH: “Yeah, it’s a weird play too because he retreats off the line and then backs up outside the numbers basically opening up to the inside when he doesn’t have any help there.”

AC: “He zone turns instead of man turns.”

ZH: “How would you prefer him play that route there. With no safety help over the top, you’d rather him take away the inside right?”

AC: “If I knew my inside help was coming from my down safety, I’m gonna play outside leverage because if he runs a slant or a dig or anything, that safety is going to slide right underneath it. I’m going to play head up and a little bit outside and press him inside. I don’t want to open the gate that gives him 30 yards of open run. If you do that in the NFL, coaches are gonna see that in the both and they are gonna start running routes away from you.”

“He’s just doing his job on this one. He stays square, shuffles his feet. [Ja’Marr] Chase is really not running any type of route. He’s running a route we used to call star pass which is a 4-6-3 with him running a stop route or a dig or a flat route to the bottom. Basically he makes a great play on the ball that he should make on that ball because the receiver is being lazy in his route running.”

ZH: “Henderson is a bit of a polarizing prospect because he has all the skill and athleticism you want but the technique and other aspects aren’t really there. What is your overall opinion of his game?”

AC: “Honestly, he’s the most athletic DB in the draft that I’ve seen. Athleticism is through the roof but the only con I have on him is I don’t think he knows what he’s playing half the time. I need to see better technique because you can only get away with so much with your athletic ability playing at the NFL level. You have to be technically sound and understand what guys are giving you so you know what to take away.”

Kristian Fulton, LSU

 

ZH: “One thing I want to say before I let you talk about this play, I love Fulton’s mindset. He’s going against this 4.2 receiver and he doesn’t back down and gets right in his face.”

AC: “I think it’s great and he’s playing to his ability. What he does best is he presses. The only thing I would take away from it is I’m not going to lung at a guy who runs 4.2. I’m going to be patient and contact him at the line and then go from there. I think he makes a heck of a play on the ball and he’s doing what he’s supposed to do. He’s staying in the hip pocket and doing what he’s supposed to do.”

ZH: “One reason I’m just so high on him is the confidence he has. How much do you like that confidence to still get in the face of a player who he is much slower than in Ruggs.”

AC: “You want your corner to play with confidence. If he’s not gonna play with confidence, he can’t play. I love the fact that he’s going up there and challenging a guy in a big game like this. You have to go up there and challenge those guys. It’s the best of the best going at it and you have to just play football.”

“My only takeaway here would be not to catch himself. He shuffles outside and stops his feet and then goes again. I don’t know if you see that but that is why the receiver got on the outside of him. If he shuffles his feet all the way through, the receiver has to come back inside and if the ball is thrown back-shoulder then he gets an easy interception.”

ZH: “So you want him to essentially keep that shuffle at the line and not stop at the contact point?”

AC: “Yeah, because if he keeps his feet shuffled, it’s a possibility that he gets the receiver out of bounds. If you can get the receiver out of bounds, the play is over with. Overall, he’s playing great defense though. He is in the receiver’s hip pocket and using the sideline to pinch him out of bounds.”

Trevon Diggs, Alabama

 

AC: “This right here is exactly what you want. The guy gives him a stutter go — it wasn’t a great stutter go — but Diggs stay in the up-field shoulder and goes up and attacks the football. You can’t ask for anything more from a guy who does that. He went up and made a play on the ball that was not intended to be made a play on. He made a heck of a play for his defense. Just look at it. He sinks when the receiver sinks, he looks back when the receiver looks back, and he got his eye on the ball. He’s playing through the receiver and plays up to the ball. Most DBs would turn their backs to the receiver and the receiver would give them a nudge and catch the ball for a touchdown. He’s playing through the receiver and playing through his hands to get the interception.”

ZH: “He never loses track of the receiver here which is huge. As someone who has done it at a high level like you did, what are you looking at to know when to turn around and make a play?”

AC: “You just play the receiver, honestly. His hands and eyes are gonna tell you everything. When the ball is coming, a receiver’s eyes get big. Once you see that, you gotta flip your head around as quickly as possible and try to make a play on the ball.”

He does a great job of widening the receiver. Look where the receiver starts compared to where he ends up outside of the hash on top of the numbers. I’d rather for him to go up and get that football because in the NFL, guys are gonna go up and go get it. He may be on Sportscenter if he don’t go up and attack that ball in the air. Great technique though and great finish and that’s all you can ask for. He basically ran the route for the guy. These two clips you have on here of Diggs, he ran the route for the receiver both times.”

 

ZH: “What are your overall thoughts on him? Like Henderson, he is a bit of a polarizing prospect in this draft class.”

AC: “I think he had an overall great year but I would like to see more from him. That is mostly due to the fact that he is new to the position. When they got into the big games late in the year, I didn’t see that playmaking ability. I thought I was gonna see a little more from him when he played guys from LSU but I didn’t see that. For me, I’d like to see him step up bigger in bigger ball games. He’s a helluva playmaker, he just has to have confidence in himself to go out and go do it.”

Jaylon Johnson, Utah

 

ZH: “This is actually an interesting coverage here from Utah, as Johnson starts in press and then he gets outside and gets into trail technique.”

AC: “I’m going to tell you what coverage they are playing right now: They are playing a soft-two trail. So you see where the safeties are and you see the corners are playing outside and underneath. They are basically playing a two-man from outside. If this were quarters, the safety would have drove on this crossing route. Both corners are playing outside and attacking underneath, so you are basically looking at a softcover two outside leverage with the corners attacking underneath.”

 

ZH: “Considering that coverage and technique they are playing, what do you think of this rep from Johnson?”

AC: “His closing speed is what’s remarkable. He’s playing outside leverage and driving on an inside breaking route, so just showing that closing speed is what’s great. If it was a better throw it would probably be a catchable ball but as a DB we would always say that a play has got to be made no matter how it is made and no matter what, we got to get the ball on the ground. I actually love this kid. I started watching him a year ago because one of my guys who coaches at Utah told me to start watching him and I started analyzing him. I like the kid and I like the way he plays and he’s gonna be a good one at the next level.”

ZH: “Those Utah players are coached so well and they have so many good players at that program. Johnson certainly is one of my favorites and why I included him in this piece.”

 

“So this last clip is interesting to me because fade routes are so popular near the goal line and, to me, Johnson plays this perfectly. Would you say this is great technique when covering a fade route?”

AC: “Oh, this is perfect technique. This is textbook technique. This is staying square and being able to control the man and feel the fade route. He understood exactly what was coming but not only look at that but look at where No. 11 is dropping. That linebacker is dropping, so Johnson understands that he has outside leverage and that he has a dropper that is going to be in the slant window so he doesn’t need to run there. This is what I mean by understanding where you are and who you are playing with. If I don’t have slant responsibility, why am I going to cover the slant? I’m going to do my responsibility and expect my teammates to do their job. The technique though here — you can’t get any better than that. I wish he would have got the pick though. I know it was overthrown but if he gets the pick, that is textbook all the way around.”

 


ZH: “We got to do more of these then for sure. Maybe we’ll do a zoom meeting or something for YouTube and talk some corner play. To close out this interview, and I know we can probably all answer this based on what you have said in this interview, but what would you say are the most important traits a DB has to have to be successful in the NFL?”

AC: “Hey, it’s no problem! We could talk another hour about this stuff man. Everyone has been asking me to analyze DBs and I hate to do it because I’m too hard but man I just love talking ball. And absolutely man, just let me know and we’ll do more of this. For me though, you have to have good feet and a high football IQ. You can have everything else like strength or playmaking and such but having that IQ and good feet are the foundation to being a good NFL cornerback. I personally know a ton of scouts are big on football IQ and technique for the NFL.”

 

So give me okudah or Fulton fr

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2 hours ago, Francis York Morgan said:

Got a feeling Cromartie would love Bryce Hall too.

And regarding JJ's speed @vel, a 4.5 isn't unworkable. He accelerates well and moves super well for a guy his size imho

Sherman and Joe Haden were both 4.55 guys.  Having elite anticipation and football IQ can more than make up for an average 40 time

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3 hours ago, ike barn87987 said:

In my Kristian Fulton thread they have the videos of the plays. Gotta click the link

I did a Fulton thread last week aswell.

Mentioned a lot of what’s been mentioned here and inevitably the Hendersen comparison came up.

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3 hours ago, Boise Falcon Fan said:

Not very.  If he has terrible technique, he could get better, but you'd think he would have worked some of his technique issues out by now. Is it the coaching he has received, or is he hard headed, and uncoachable?

I think alot of guys when they don’t get it revert to what they no best not saying this is it with Hendersen.What I do get the inkling of about him though he’s confident and backs his speed to make a play.Now wheather this survives at the next level I’m not sure it’s why I’m iffy about him.

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I honestly just don't see the Benefit of drafting any of these guys at 16.  Okudah i could understand as he is on a tier by himself at the corner position.   But the fact a 2nd rounder in Gladney, Diggs, Hall, and Terrell and a 3rd rounder in Johnson, Arnette, and Dantzler  all have similar tape with Crom actually liking the 3rd rounder more than the 1st rounder in Henderson.  Shows to me reaching on one at 16 just isn't a smart move and you should play to the drafts strengths which is CB where you can get a very talented and maybe even better player in the 2nd to 3rd round while addressing a weaker position in the 1st round with a much better prospect.   To me drafting something like  this

1st - Chassion/Murray/Queen/Baun
2nd - Diggs/Gladney/Hall/Terrell/Igob
3rd - Lawrence/Leki

or 

1st - Chassion/Murray/Queen/Baun
2nd - Gallimore/Madubuike/Davidson/Winfield/Uche
3rd - Johnson/Arnette/Dantzler/Igo

The strength of each position in this class is LB in round 1  DT in round 2 and CB in round 2 and 3.  Their is a much bigger drop off at LB, S, and DT in round 3 than their is at CB if im trying to draft the most talent possible at each position.   Im quite a big fan of Johnson and Igo and i would take both of them over some round 1 and 2 guys as i like both more than Henderson for sure and over Terrel as well. I put them pretty similar to Diggs, Gladney, and Fulton who are over those other 2 i listed.

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8 minutes ago, FalconFan13 said:

I honestly just don't see the Benefit of drafting any of these guys at 16.  Okudah i could understand as he is on a tier by himself at the corner position.   But the fact a 2nd rounder in Gladney, Diggs, Hall, and Terrell and a 3rd rounder in Johnson, Arnette, and Dantzler  all have similar tape with Crom actually liking the 3rd rounder more than the 1st rounder in Henderson.  Shows to me reaching on one at 16 just isn't a smart move and you should play to the drafts strengths which is CB where you can get a very talented and maybe even better player in the 2nd to 3rd round while addressing a weaker position in the 1st round with a much better prospect.   To me drafting something like  this

1st - Chassion/Murray/Queen/Baun
2nd - Diggs/Gladney/Hall/Terrell/Igob
3rd - Lawrence/Leki

or 

1st - Chassion/Murray/Queen/Baun
2nd - Gallimore/Madubuike/Davidson/Winfield/Uche
3rd - Johnson/Arnette/Dantzler/Igo

The strength of each position in this class is LB in round 1  DT in round 2 and CB in round 2 and 3.  Their is a much bigger drop off at LB, S, and DT in round 3 than their is at CB if im trying to draft the most talent possible at each position.   Im quite a big fan of Johnson and Igo and i would take both of them over some round 1 and 2 guys as i like both more than Henderson for sure and over Terrel as well. I put them pretty similar to Diggs, Gladney, and Fulton who are over those other 2 i listed.

Please no on Leki fotu brah stupid slow.. replace him with Elliott 

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