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We Need To Hire Callahan Immediately


FalconsIn2012
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I’ll know all I need to know about this regime if we don’t make a coaching move to fix our OL.  Two of the very best are available right now and we should have both in Flowery Branch yesterday.  @Knight of God thinks Callahan has a special touch with OL.    Get it done, Quinn!!!!

 

 

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I'll always remember Bill Callahan as the coach who took over Oakland for Jon Gruden after Gruden left for Tampa.  Then he played Gruden in the SB and didn't alter his offense at all despite running the exact same offense under Gruden the year before.  I'm sure he's a good coach.  That's just what I will always remember him for. 

Then I start thinking how lucky Tampa was to face them in the SB.  Then I start thinking how we had to face the GOAT QB and GOAT HC in the SB. SMH. 

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1 minute ago, thamill said:

I'll always remember Bill Callahan as the coach who took over Oakland for Jon Gruden after Gruden left for Tampa.  Then he played Gruden in the SB and didn't alter his offense at all despite running the exact same offense under Gruden the year before.  I'm sure he's a good coach.  That's just what I will always remember him for. 

Then I start thinking how lucky Tampa was to face them in the SB.  Then I start thinking how we had to face the GOAT QB and GOAT HC. 

He did a great job with Dallas and with Washington...but he runs more gap scheme.  Has he ever coached zone?

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3 minutes ago, JDaveG said:

This is it.  If we're stuck on zone, I don't see this being the way forward.

If not, bring him in and let him do his thing.  But I'm tired of square pegs/round holes.

I actually stand corrected.  Callahan ran ZBS in Dallas and did so beautifully 

Understanding Bill Callahan’s Zone Blocking Scheme: Dallas Cowboys O-line Profile

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Zone Blocking Scheme (ZBS)… But Not the Shanahan Zone

If you read my breakdown on Alfred Morris’ fit in Bill Callahan’s scheme from last summer, you will understand the basics of the scheme, but if not I’ll give you a brief overview. As always, please check out the Beginner Series if you have any questions on the basics of the plays or concepts listed below.

This scheme is based on zone blocking, but it is not the same scheme that was run when Mike Shanahan was the head coach of the Washington Redskins that put Alfred Morris on the map as a rookie. This scheme is quite a bit different. 

In this scheme, Callahan and Pollack call zone blocking plays, outside or inside zone, roughly 80-90% of play calls. Instead of favoring the the outside zone to set up the inside zone cutback, Callahan and Pollack use the combination blocks of the inside zone to blast open holes between the A-gaps of the defense. Outside and inside zones are called at roughly a 1:1 ratio, while Shanahan clearly favored the outside zone. Same plays, different purposes.

For example, here are the Redskins and the Cowboys running the outside zone. Both Alfred Morris and Darren McFadden did a great job of reading their blocks and not wasting any extra time in the backfield to cut up the hole for a moderate gain.

 

 

In the inside gap play call, both teams line up with eight men near the line of scrimmage using multiple tight ends. Typically it’s the double teams that the running back are looking for, but in these two examples, the defense brought enough players to the line of scrimmage that allowed the running backs to cut outside. An ideal result.

 

 

Outside of zone blocking plays, the other 10-20% of play calls are based on power running concepts. This involves using two lead blockers for the running back. The first play is the counter power or counter OF, while the second play is just the classic Power O.

Power plays work to overload one side of the field with men, which is why the counter OF can be used well in this scheme. Once a defense starts flowing after some outside zone runs, you fake one direction, get the defense moving, and then overload the other side of the line.

 

 

This scheme requires larger, more adaptable offensive lineman. They need the endurance and quick feet to run outside zone, while it requires the same offensive lineman to be strong at the point of attack. This skill-set allows an offensive lineman to stay relatively larger than a Shanahan lineman and therefore be better in pass protection.

In order to execute both running styles, you need a running back that possesses one-cut running abilities on zone runs, while he has to have the balanced patience to set up blocks in power runs. Finding both qualities is very difficult in the NFL.

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Some info on Hiestand 

 

Hiestand was hired on January 11, 2005 as Chicago’s offensive line coach. The Bears were one of six teams to have the same five offensive linemen start all 16 games in 2008 (C Olin Kreutz, LG Josh Beekman, RG Roberto Garza, LT John St. Clair and RT John Tait), marking the first time since 2001 that Chicago had the same five players start all 16 contests along the line. 

The offensive line would become the most experienced unit on the Bears roster over the next couple of years, led by 11-year veteran and six-time Pro Bowl C Kreutz, who entered the 2009 season having started a team-high 102 consecutive games. 

In 2008, Chicago’s offense attempted 557 pass plays and absorbed 29 sacks. In 2006, the Bears attempted 539 pass plays and allowed just 25 sacks, the lowest total given up by the team since allowing 17 in 2001, as Chicago went on to win the 2006 NFC Championship leading to the organization’s first Super Bowl appearance in 21 years.

Tennessee and Notre DameEdit

After spending two years coaching the offensive line at the University of Tennessee from 2010–2012, Hiestand was hired to the same post at the University of Notre Dame under head coach Brian Kelly. Since reaching the BCS National Championship Game during his first season at Notre Dame, Hiestand has developed a number of current NFL offensive linemen with the Fighting Irish, including:

Second stint with BearsEdit

On January 10, 2018, Hiestand returned to the Bears after being hired by new head coach Matt Nagy as the offensive line coach.[2]

Under Hiestand, the 2018 Bears allowed 33 sacks, tied for the eighth-fewest in the NFL. Center Cody Whitehair and left tackle Charles Leno Jr. were named to their first Pro Bowl to become the first Bears offensive linemen teammates to make the all-star game since 2006.[3]

In 2019, however, Chicago's offensive line allowed 43 sacks (12th most in the league) and helped the offense record just 91.1 rushing yards per game (sixth worst).[4]Hiestand was fired on December 31.[5]

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18 minutes ago, FalconsIn2012 said:

Zone Blocking Scheme (ZBS)… But Not the Shanahan Zone

If you read my breakdown on Alfred Morris’ fit in Bill Callahan’s scheme from last summer, you will understand the basics of the scheme, but if not I’ll give you a brief overview. As always, please check out the Beginner Series if you have any questions on the basics of the plays or concepts listed below.

This scheme is based on zone blocking, but it is not the same scheme that was run when Mike Shanahan was the head coach of the Washington Redskins that put Alfred Morris on the map as a rookie. This scheme is quite a bit different. 

In this scheme, Callahan and Pollack call zone blocking plays, outside or inside zone, roughly 80-90% of play calls. Instead of favoring the the outside zone to set up the inside zone cutback, Callahan and Pollack use the combination blocks of the inside zone to blast open holes between the A-gaps of the defense. Outside and inside zones are called at roughly a 1:1 ratio, while Shanahan clearly favored the outside zone. Same plays, different purposes.

For example, here are the Redskins and the Cowboys running the outside zone. Both Alfred Morris and Darren McFadden did a great job of reading their blocks and not wasting any extra time in the backfield to cut up the hole for a moderate gain.

 

 

In the inside gap play call, both teams line up with eight men near the line of scrimmage using multiple tight ends. Typically it’s the double teams that the running back are looking for, but in these two examples, the defense brought enough players to the line of scrimmage that allowed the running backs to cut outside. An ideal result.

 

 

Outside of zone blocking plays, the other 10-20% of play calls are based on power running concepts. This involves using two lead blockers for the running back. The first play is the counter power or counter OF, while the second play is just the classic Power O.

Power plays work to overload one side of the field with men, which is why the counter OF can be used well in this scheme. Once a defense starts flowing after some outside zone runs, you fake one direction, get the defense moving, and then overload the other side of the line.

 

 

This scheme requires larger, more adaptable offensive lineman. They need the endurance and quick feet to run outside zone, while it requires the same offensive lineman to be strong at the point of attack. This skill-set allows an offensive lineman to stay relatively larger than a Shanahan lineman and therefore be better in pass protection.

In order to execute both running styles, you need a running back that possesses one-cut running abilities on zone runs, while he has to have the balanced patience to set up blocks in power runs. Finding both qualities is very difficult in the NFL.

Dude, this sounds exactly like what Koetter and Mularkey like to run.

Hire him now.  Hire him yesterday.

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32 minutes ago, JDaveG said:

Dude, this sounds exactly like what Koetter and Mularkey like to run.

Hire him now.  Hire him yesterday.

Parts of it.  I agree.  But at least his pedigree is zone.  That’s not the case for Koetter or Mularkey.  And the 1:1 ratio certainly isn’t similar

Edit: I misunderstood.  Thought you were being sarcastic.  @JDaveG

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1 hour ago, FalconsIn2012 said:

I’ll know all I need to know about this regime if we don’t make a coaching move to fix our OL.  Two of the very best are available right now and we should have both in Flowery Branch yesterday.  @Knight of God thinks Callahan has a special touch with OL.    Get it done, Quinn!!!!

 

 

I tell you what, if they don’t bring in Callahan or have any interest than they are not doing their due diligence.

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33 minutes ago, FalconsIn2012 said:

Parts of it.  I agree.  But at least his pedigree is zone.  That’s not the case for Koetter or Mularkey.  And the 1:1 ratio certainly isn’t similar

Edit: I misunderstood.  Thought you were being sarcastic.  @JDaveG

Lord no -- I'm very serious.  Mularkey runs a lot of zone.  Koetter mixes zone with gap principles.

Hire this man and let him work.  100% serious about that.

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2 hours ago, thamill said:

I'll always remember Bill Callahan as the coach who took over Oakland for Jon Gruden after Gruden left for Tampa.  Then he played Gruden in the SB and didn't alter his offense at all despite running the exact same offense under Gruden the year before.  I'm sure he's a good coach.  That's just what I will always remember him for. 

Then I start thinking how lucky Tampa was to face them in the SB.  Then I start thinking how we had to face the GOAT QB and GOAT HC in the SB. SMH. 

Gruden knew that Raider team so well that he actually put on pads and mimicked Gannon to a T...his footwork...his head movement....his cadence....Gruden was able to replicate everything live for the Bucs defense.

 

He (Callahan) is an amazing Oline coach...just was not a great head coach.

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1 hour ago, Sidecar Falcon said:

Last year I was banging the drums for us to sign Mike Munchak. Our offensive line coach needs to be upgraded in a MAJOR way. Unfortunately we let Denver get him. 

Munchak always seems to get away from us. I love him as a OL coach. 

Callahan should be our top priority. 

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