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IT people.....step into the office


falconsd56
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This is for the resident ABF nerds,geeks and dweebs......I mean information technology aficionados.

 

I am considering a career change into the IT field (I currently work in the mortgage world).

I am looking into different college programs to get my associates to start & I have been seeing a lot of things about coding "boot camps"....I am just not sure if those are legit....I am seeing mixed reviews on

Part of the problem that I have is that I am not really sure what exactly area that I want to be in...but I do know that I am looking for a change and I am exploring options.

What are some tips or suggestions that you guys would have for someone who would be entry level into IT??

Are those boot camp style programs legit?.....Even if they are legit are they worth it? Can they be a substitute for a degree or should they be used in conjunction with a degree?

 

Thanks in advance for any direction.

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9 minutes ago, shc said:

I would actually recommend like a oreilly books online or pluralsight subscription. 

 

Some of where you start may be be dictated by what you currently know and familiarity on a computer. 

Thanks for info.

I am comfortable with a computer and have done some basic networking......but if it gets too crazy then I just call my dad.

I would not mind expanding my comfort zone some.

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1 minute ago, falconsd56 said:

Thanks for info.

I am comfortable with a computer and have done some basic networking......but if it gets too crazy then I just call my dad.

I would not mind expanding my comfort zone some.

More from the software side. Are you looking at software/coding, or network/infrastructure/networking?

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I personally rotate between the AV and IT fields.  Most guys I know that went the cert route got the certs so they could get a job and get experience once they got the experience companies were looking for let the certs expire and never have a hard time finding and holding a job. I went the degree route not the cert route. I have done video conferencing support core support for large Oil and Gas firms. I am currently application / server support setting up licensing servers and working with vendors to keep license up dated on the servers and provide tier 3 application support for engineering and manufacturing apps for a petrochemical company. Many of the server guys I know are being outsourced and and replaced by an overseas managed service providers.

 

 

Edited by Brehus
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Look at Udemy and coursera for a cheap intro into different disciplines such as network, systems, and application support.  Once you have an idea of which direction you want to go, report back.  I always recommend self paced learning.  There are many choices that I can recommend based on which direction you want to go.  

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To answer your questions,

 

What are some tips or suggestions that you guys would have for someone who would be entry level into IT??

Be prepared to teach yourself.  Boot camps are only one option.

Are those boot camp style programs legit?

Some are, depends on your personal learning style

Even if they are legit are they worth it?

Depends on how much you can retain along with how much material is available after the course.  Lectures and powerpoints are great, but hands on is necessary for entry level guys. 

 

Can they be a substitute for a degree or should they be used in conjunction with a degree?

  A degree is completely unnecessary imo.  By the time you achieve your degree, who knows where the IT industry will be.  For example, Virtualization of infrastructure was all the rage 5-10 years ago.  Now infrastructure is being moved off the campus into the cloud.  IMO, college moves far to slow for IT.  

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18 hours ago, mfaulk57158 said:

For example, Virtualization of infrastructure was all the rage 5-10 years ago.  Now infrastructure is being moved off the campus into the cloud.  IMO, college moves far to slow for IT.  

A joke I always make about the cloud, is it is a still a server sitting under someone else’s desk. 

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19 hours ago, mfaulk57158 said:

To answer your questions,

 

What are some tips or suggestions that you guys would have for someone who would be entry level into IT??

Be prepared to teach yourself.  Boot camps are only one option.

Are those boot camp style programs legit?

Some are, depends on your personal learning style

Even if they are legit are they worth it?

Depends on how much you can retain along with how much material is available after the course.  Lectures and powerpoints are great, but hands on is necessary for entry level guys. 

 

Can they be a substitute for a degree or should they be used in conjunction with a degree?

  A degree is completely unnecessary imo.  By the time you achieve your degree, who knows where the IT industry will be.  For example, Virtualization of infrastructure was all the rage 5-10 years ago.  Now infrastructure is being moved off the campus into the cloud.  IMO, college moves far to slow for IT.  

A degree isn't necessary, however, it helps if you want to go into a supervisory role. Like someone stated earlier, you don't have to know a particular realm of IT in order to be over a bunch of guys that do. 

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Just seeing this, Udemy has some great courses to get started And they are like Jos A Bank in that they are always having a sell on their courses.  Boot camps are good, but they all depend on the network they have around them and where people end up.  One of the best JavaScript devs I know came out of a boot camp.  
 

Join financial IT.  All you need is a functioning brain and you will be set.  Seen people who couldn’t code their way out of a paper bag move within organizations.  You could probably fire 50% of an organization’s IT department and still be just as productive if not more so.  
 

After you get your legs under you and you feel you can continue.  Look up “SOLID principles”, referential transparency and immutability.  I basically always coded thinking about those 3 things and life is much easier.

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23 minutes ago, lostone said:

Just seeing this, Udemy has some great courses to get started And they are like Jos A Bank in that they are always having a sell on their courses.  Boot camps are good, but they all depend on the network they have around them and where people end up.  One of the best JavaScript devs I know came out of a boot camp.  
 

Join financial IT.  All you need is a functioning brain and you will be set.  Seen people who couldn’t code their way out of a paper bag move within organizations.  You could probably fire 50% of an organization’s IT department and still be just as productive if not more so.  
 

After you get your legs under you and you feel you can continue.  Look up “SOLID principles”, referential transparency and immutability.  I basically always coded thinking about those 3 things and life is much easier.

Man, I failed coding the first time and barely passed the second time by the skin of my teeth.

That's something you definitely have to do on the regular in order to get good at it.

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On 12/29/2019 at 5:39 PM, lostone said:

Just seeing this, Udemy has some great courses to get started And they are like Jos A Bank in that they are always having a sell on their courses.  Boot camps are good, but they all depend on the network they have around them and where people end up.  One of the best JavaScript devs I know came out of a boot camp.  
 

Join financial IT.  All you need is a functioning brain and you will be set.  Seen people who couldn’t code their way out of a paper bag move within organizations.  You could probably fire 50% of an organization’s IT department and still be just as productive if not more so.  
 

After you get your legs under you and you feel you can continue.  Look up “SOLID principles”, referential transparency and immutability.  I basically always coded thinking about those 3 things and life is much easier.

All the IT guys asin around on this forum during business hours is proof of the above.

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