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‘This scheme is a dream’: How Kyle Shanahan’s time with Falcons helped shape 49ers


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GettyImages-506368274-e1576195136889-102

SANTA CLARA, Calif. — Kyle Shanahan is meticulous — always has been, always will be. He pays extra attention to the finer details of offensive football, hoping to find an edge when scheming up an opponent. For offensive linemen, whether it’s a starter, a reserve or a member of the practice squad, Shanahan wants to ensure they know what to do on a given play and the reasons why. Running backs must be decisive when finding the tracks to run through. And when the running game is in sync, play-action passes begin to open up for big gains. There is a lot for each player to learn and remember.

When it works, however, it’s incredibly tough to stop.

This offensive philosophy has helped propel the San Francisco 49ers to an 11-2 record while ranking second in the NFL in rushing at 149.1 yards per game. In a pass-happy era during which quarterbacks are throwing the ball more than ever, the 49ers have stuck to the Shanahan family’s tried-and-true run scheme that has worked for almost four decades.

The Falcons, who will play the 49ers on Sunday afternoon at Levi’s Stadium, are extremely familiar with this scheme, considering Shanahan was head coach Dan Quinn’s first offensive coordinator in 2015 and 2016. In 2016, when the Falcons reached Super Bowl LI, the offensive firepower was evident. Atlanta finished the regular season second in the NFL in total yardage (415.8 yards per game), third in passing (295.3) and fifth in rushing (120.5). Quarterback Matt Ryan had his best season statistically with 4,944 yards and 38 touchdowns en route to winning the NFL’s MVP award.

With this year’s 49ers team posting the best record in the NFC, Shanahan was asked if this group resembles that 2016 Falcons offense. He wasn’t ready to make that declaration with three games to go in the regular season.

“We have signs of it,” Shanahan said. “What we did there in ’16 was pretty special, just from the first game to the last game. It was all year, there was no letup in that. I think we had one game where we were under 20 (points), and it was at Philly. Besides that, everyone was moving pretty good that year consistently. I think we’ve shown signs of potential of that this year. Hopefully, we can get there week in and week out.”

‘This scheme is a dream’

No matter the era, it seems as if the Shanahan system has produced in a big way. Dating back to when Mike Shanahan, Kyle’s father, was either coordinating an offense or working as a head coach in the 1980s and 1990s, this outside zone run scheme has worked. The number of running backs who weren’t highly lauded entering the NFL and surpassed 1,000 yards in a season is staggering. Terrell Davis, Olandis Gary, Mike Anderson, Reuben Droughns and Alfred Morris are runners who come to mind when thinking of Mike Shanahan’s overlooked but incredibly productive group. Kyle Shanahan, in San Francisco, has been able to get great production out of undrafted running backs Matt Breida and Raheem Mostert this season.

What also has helped is the fact that San Francisco has put together the kind of offensive line personnel to make this scheme work. The most stunning part about the line’s execution, however, is that it has dealt with numerous injuries and not missed a beat. Both starting tackles, Joe Staley and Mike McGlinchey, were forced to miss time this season, which forced young tackle Daniel Brunskill into action.

Brunskill spent the 2017 and 2018 seasons on Atlanta’s practice squad but was not brought back to the team this past offseason. He spent the spring in the already-defunct AAF with the San Diego Fleet, with whom he was able to finally get some live reps on tape. General manager John Lynch credited a 49ers scout for noticing Brunskill’s AAF games, which led to his eventual signing. Brunskill made the most of his new opportunity and made the 53-man roster out of training camp.

In relief of the injured tackles this year, Brunskill started five games and, according to Pro Football Focus, only allowed one sack in 367 snaps.

“They believed in me,” Brunskill said. “Kyle, whenever an opportunity arose, they didn’t try to get somebody else. They believed in their guys. That helps a lot. It helps your confidence when the coach believes in you.”

Brunskill, at 6-foot-7 and 300 pounds, has been overlooked throughout most of his career. He was originally a walk-on in college at San Diego State and played on the offensive line and at tight end. While the Falcons thought enough of Brunskill to keep him on the practice squad for two years, they weren’t able to see his development through. San Francisco, however, is now reaping the benefits of identifying his talent.

A similar thing could be said about Mike Person, who started 14 games for Atlanta in 2015 before being released mid-year in 2016. After stops in Kansas City and Indianapolis, Person rejoined the 49ers, who drafted him in 2011, and is now the starting right guard for the NFL’s fourth-best total offense (388.6 yards per game).

“As an offensive lineman, this scheme is a dream,” Person said. “It sets you up for success if you do things right. It takes a lot of work to get to the point to where we’re at, but we still have a lot of work to go. It’s a blast being an offensive lineman in this scheme.”

Brunskill and Person are joined by another Falcons lineman, Ben Garland. All three of the former Falcons-turned-49ers offensive linemen credited Shanahan’s expectations for any player being able to step into the lineup and succeed. In meetings, Shanahan will go over plays extensively. It can almost feel like information overload but not necessarily in a bad way. An offensive lineman may not need to know a specific detail, but Shanahan wants to share it anyway. The purpose is for each player to know why the team is running a particular play, how it sets up a later play and why it’s important to do those things so that Shanahan can dial up another call to work off of those plays.

Garland is starting for Weston Richburg, who went on IR this week.

“I think he’s an unbelievably intelligent coach,” Garland said. “He has a great understanding of the game and how to work defenses. Depending on what defenses do, how to change the offense with the plays he calls and taking the best advantage of what defenses are running. He’s a genius.”

Said Brunskill: “I think he does a great job of explaining what he wants. He has a vision for each play in the way he designs it and what we want it to be. If it’s not what he’s envisioned, he doesn’t usually go with those plays. What he does, especially in team meetings, he’s going to explain plays and why he’s doing the play and all the different things he’s to it — most of the stuff you don’t even need to know as an O-lineman. It’s nice to see what his big picture is and see what he wants and is trying to see.”

In retrospect, it is clear to see how big of a loss Shanahan — and the offensive assistants he took with him to San Francisco — was for Atlanta. The Falcons, in principle, kept the same style of offense in the subsequent years but have been unable to replicate the results Shanahan delivered in 2016.

“I remember when he was here, looking at him by Friday afternoon and being like, ‘Dude, you need to get some sleep. Get some rest,’” Falcons quarterback Matt Ryan told reporters during his weekly media appearance. “He’d come in looking refreshed Saturday and Sunday, but he would grind through the week. It’s no surprise that he has their offense playing well because he’s excellent at knowing what to do. I think that was one of his biggest strengths here too. Having an understanding for what he wants as an offense and finding the specific pieces that fit within what he wants to do. He’s really good about that.”

Atlanta West

Not taking into account the disparity in each team’s win-loss record, it would be easy to refer to the 49ers as Atlanta West. When Shanahan took the 49ers’ head coaching job, he took four assistants with him — passing game coordinator Mike LaFleur, run game coordinator Mike McDaniel, running backs coach Bobby Turner and offensive assistant Katie Sowers. During the past three offseasons, the 49ers have picked up a handful of former Falcons players. Most notably, they signed running back Tevin Coleman, who was drafted and spent the past four years with Atlanta, to a two-year, $10 million contract. This past offseason they also acquired Garland, Brunskill and tight end Levine Toilolo.

While Atlanta employed a similar offensive scheme following his departure, Shanahan hired defensive coordinator Robert Saleh to coach a similar Cover 3 style of defense that Quinn runs in Atlanta. The two teams, in terms of style, are built similarly across the board.

The major difference when it comes to the 2019 season, obviously, is that the 49ers are in the midst of the playoff hunt at 11-2 and the Falcons are out of the postseason picture at 4-9. But based on the experience Shanahan had in Atlanta, he wanted to put similar principles into place when it came to shaping the 49ers’ culture.

“There were definitely some characteristics and some things I saw Kyle take from Dan, not to get into the specifics,” said LaFleur, who was a quality control assistant on the 2015 and 2016 Falcons teams. “You could see with the ‘brotherhood’ and knowing that to be as good as we can be, our players have to be really tight. I know that was the case in ’16 in Atlanta, and I’m sure that’s still the case to this day. That was something I know, myself personally, I took personally but I know Kyle took from it, as well.”

Quinn and Shanahan have different personality traits. Shanahan mentioned how upbeat and positive Quinn always was during work hours. Shanahan described himself, during those days, as “focusing on being a coordinator and whatever the task at hand was totally.”

A great example of the difference between Quinn and Shanahan’s personalities would stem from reports in 2015 that cited some workplace friction between Shanahan and Ryan. By the next season, however, the offense proved to be one of the best in NFL and probably the greatest in franchise history. Shanahan and Ryan found common ground and have developed a good relationship.

“He challenged me to get better, improve in certain areas and taught me a lot about offensive football,” Ryan said. “Just seeing things from a different perspective, I feel like I made big jumps in the two years we were together, and I’m happy for him that he’s having great success. He works his *** off. He works extremely hard. He’s one of those guys, he’s grinding all week.”

Sunday will be a special one for many of the 49ers who have Falcons ties. Even McGlinchey has a close tie in this game as he and Ryan are cousins. McGlinchey called this upcoming game “a fun little bragging rights kind of week.”

LaFleur and McDaniel said seeing coaches and players they spent two long years with will be meaningful. While the teams are on opposite paths, they’re still linked closely.

McDaniel, who began his coaching career as an intern with the Denver Broncos in 2005, remembered how Quinn’s approach changed his thinking about the profession. It’s something he feels has been carried over with the 49ers, which has helped make them successful this season.

“Really, the entire culture he created in Atlanta, that is something that won’t ever get away from me,” McDaniel said. “You can enjoy doing your job. This is what we’ve aspired to do our entire lives — players and coaches. The stress can overwhelm people. With Coach Quinn, he’d be like, ‘This is not good enough, this is not up to our standard. But hey, if we do this, we’re totally capable. Let’s go have fun doing it.’ It’s the idea of creating a family — as he coined it in Atlanta, a ‘brotherhood.’ That’s something blasted me across the face. His emphasis with that and the way he conducted that was very impactful and I don’t think will ever leave me.”

 

https://theathletic.com/1456675/2019/12/12/this-scheme-is-a-dream-how-kyle-shanahans-time-with-falcons-helped-shape-49ers

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I have such mixed feelings about KS. He's simultaneously the mastermind behind the most exciting/fun offense to watch in my entire Falcons fandom, the offensive genius who took us to a Super Bowl .... and the arrogant SOB who (with Quinn's quiet blessing) cost us our first ring.

I hate him. 

And if he wanted to come back as our head coach, I'd be dancing in the streets.

 

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15 minutes ago, R_The_Great said:

It's sad we couldn't find a legit solution for the offense all these years.  We knew what worked and we just let it go every way possible

The solution was in the building and both of them were allowed to walk. Now one coordinates the league's second best rushing attack and the other has coached Green Bay to a 10-3 record.

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43 minutes ago, MilleniumFalcon said:

GettyImages-506368274-e1576195136889-102

SANTA CLARA, Calif. — Kyle Shanahan is meticulous — always has been, always will be. He pays extra attention to the finer details of offensive football, hoping to find an edge when scheming up an opponent. For offensive linemen, whether it’s a starter, a reserve or a member of the practice squad, Shanahan wants to ensure they know what to do on a given play and the reasons why. Running backs must be decisive when finding the tracks to run through. And when the running game is in sync, play-action passes begin to open up for big gains. There is a lot for each player to learn and remember.

When it works, however, it’s incredibly tough to stop.

This offensive philosophy has helped propel the San Francisco 49ers to an 11-2 record while ranking second in the NFL in rushing at 149.1 yards per game. In a pass-happy era during which quarterbacks are throwing the ball more than ever, the 49ers have stuck to the Shanahan family’s tried-and-true run scheme that has worked for almost four decades.

The Falcons, who will play the 49ers on Sunday afternoon at Levi’s Stadium, are extremely familiar with this scheme, considering Shanahan was head coach Dan Quinn’s first offensive coordinator in 2015 and 2016. In 2016, when the Falcons reached Super Bowl LI, the offensive firepower was evident. Atlanta finished the regular season second in the NFL in total yardage (415.8 yards per game), third in passing (295.3) and fifth in rushing (120.5). Quarterback Matt Ryan had his best season statistically with 4,944 yards and 38 touchdowns en route to winning the NFL’s MVP award.

With this year’s 49ers team posting the best record in the NFC, Shanahan was asked if this group resembles that 2016 Falcons offense. He wasn’t ready to make that declaration with three games to go in the regular season.

“We have signs of it,” Shanahan said. “What we did there in ’16 was pretty special, just from the first game to the last game. It was all year, there was no letup in that. I think we had one game where we were under 20 (points), and it was at Philly. Besides that, everyone was moving pretty good that year consistently. I think we’ve shown signs of potential of that this year. Hopefully, we can get there week in and week out.”

‘This scheme is a dream’

No matter the era, it seems as if the Shanahan system has produced in a big way. Dating back to when Mike Shanahan, Kyle’s father, was either coordinating an offense or working as a head coach in the 1980s and 1990s, this outside zone run scheme has worked. The number of running backs who weren’t highly lauded entering the NFL and surpassed 1,000 yards in a season is staggering. Terrell Davis, Olandis Gary, Mike Anderson, Reuben Droughns and Alfred Morris are runners who come to mind when thinking of Mike Shanahan’s overlooked but incredibly productive group. Kyle Shanahan, in San Francisco, has been able to get great production out of undrafted running backs Matt Breida and Raheem Mostert this season.

What also has helped is the fact that San Francisco has put together the kind of offensive line personnel to make this scheme work. The most stunning part about the line’s execution, however, is that it has dealt with numerous injuries and not missed a beat. Both starting tackles, Joe Staley and Mike McGlinchey, were forced to miss time this season, which forced young tackle Daniel Brunskill into action.

Brunskill spent the 2017 and 2018 seasons on Atlanta’s practice squad but was not brought back to the team this past offseason. He spent the spring in the already-defunct AAF with the San Diego Fleet, with whom he was able to finally get some live reps on tape. General manager John Lynch credited a 49ers scout for noticing Brunskill’s AAF games, which led to his eventual signing. Brunskill made the most of his new opportunity and made the 53-man roster out of training camp.

In relief of the injured tackles this year, Brunskill started five games and, according to Pro Football Focus, only allowed one sack in 367 snaps.

“They believed in me,” Brunskill said. “Kyle, whenever an opportunity arose, they didn’t try to get somebody else. They believed in their guys. That helps a lot. It helps your confidence when the coach believes in you.”

Brunskill, at 6-foot-7 and 300 pounds, has been overlooked throughout most of his career. He was originally a walk-on in college at San Diego State and played on the offensive line and at tight end. While the Falcons thought enough of Brunskill to keep him on the practice squad for two years, they weren’t able to see his development through. San Francisco, however, is now reaping the benefits of identifying his talent.

A similar thing could be said about Mike Person, who started 14 games for Atlanta in 2015 before being released mid-year in 2016. After stops in Kansas City and Indianapolis, Person rejoined the 49ers, who drafted him in 2011, and is now the starting right guard for the NFL’s fourth-best total offense (388.6 yards per game).

“As an offensive lineman, this scheme is a dream,” Person said. “It sets you up for success if you do things right. It takes a lot of work to get to the point to where we’re at, but we still have a lot of work to go. It’s a blast being an offensive lineman in this scheme.”

Brunskill and Person are joined by another Falcons lineman, Ben Garland. All three of the former Falcons-turned-49ers offensive linemen credited Shanahan’s expectations for any player being able to step into the lineup and succeed. In meetings, Shanahan will go over plays extensively. It can almost feel like information overload but not necessarily in a bad way. An offensive lineman may not need to know a specific detail, but Shanahan wants to share it anyway. The purpose is for each player to know why the team is running a particular play, how it sets up a later play and why it’s important to do those things so that Shanahan can dial up another call to work off of those plays.

Garland is starting for Weston Richburg, who went on IR this week.

“I think he’s an unbelievably intelligent coach,” Garland said. “He has a great understanding of the game and how to work defenses. Depending on what defenses do, how to change the offense with the plays he calls and taking the best advantage of what defenses are running. He’s a genius.”

Said Brunskill: “I think he does a great job of explaining what he wants. He has a vision for each play in the way he designs it and what we want it to be. If it’s not what he’s envisioned, he doesn’t usually go with those plays. What he does, especially in team meetings, he’s going to explain plays and why he’s doing the play and all the different things he’s to it — most of the stuff you don’t even need to know as an O-lineman. It’s nice to see what his big picture is and see what he wants and is trying to see.”

In retrospect, it is clear to see how big of a loss Shanahan — and the offensive assistants he took with him to San Francisco — was for Atlanta. The Falcons, in principle, kept the same style of offense in the subsequent years but have been unable to replicate the results Shanahan delivered in 2016.

“I remember when he was here, looking at him by Friday afternoon and being like, ‘Dude, you need to get some sleep. Get some rest,’” Falcons quarterback Matt Ryan told reporters during his weekly media appearance. “He’d come in looking refreshed Saturday and Sunday, but he would grind through the week. It’s no surprise that he has their offense playing well because he’s excellent at knowing what to do. I think that was one of his biggest strengths here too. Having an understanding for what he wants as an offense and finding the specific pieces that fit within what he wants to do. He’s really good about that.”

Atlanta West

Not taking into account the disparity in each team’s win-loss record, it would be easy to refer to the 49ers as Atlanta West. When Shanahan took the 49ers’ head coaching job, he took four assistants with him — passing game coordinator Mike LaFleur, run game coordinator Mike McDaniel, running backs coach Bobby Turner and offensive assistant Katie Sowers. During the past three offseasons, the 49ers have picked up a handful of former Falcons players. Most notably, they signed running back Tevin Coleman, who was drafted and spent the past four years with Atlanta, to a two-year, $10 million contract. This past offseason they also acquired Garland, Brunskill and tight end Levine Toilolo.

While Atlanta employed a similar offensive scheme following his departure, Shanahan hired defensive coordinator Robert Saleh to coach a similar Cover 3 style of defense that Quinn runs in Atlanta. The two teams, in terms of style, are built similarly across the board.

The major difference when it comes to the 2019 season, obviously, is that the 49ers are in the midst of the playoff hunt at 11-2 and the Falcons are out of the postseason picture at 4-9. But based on the experience Shanahan had in Atlanta, he wanted to put similar principles into place when it came to shaping the 49ers’ culture.

“There were definitely some characteristics and some things I saw Kyle take from Dan, not to get into the specifics,” said LaFleur, who was a quality control assistant on the 2015 and 2016 Falcons teams. “You could see with the ‘brotherhood’ and knowing that to be as good as we can be, our players have to be really tight. I know that was the case in ’16 in Atlanta, and I’m sure that’s still the case to this day. That was something I know, myself personally, I took personally but I know Kyle took from it, as well.”

Quinn and Shanahan have different personality traits. Shanahan mentioned how upbeat and positive Quinn always was during work hours. Shanahan described himself, during those days, as “focusing on being a coordinator and whatever the task at hand was totally.”

A great example of the difference between Quinn and Shanahan’s personalities would stem from reports in 2015 that cited some workplace friction between Shanahan and Ryan. By the next season, however, the offense proved to be one of the best in NFL and probably the greatest in franchise history. Shanahan and Ryan found common ground and have developed a good relationship.

“He challenged me to get better, improve in certain areas and taught me a lot about offensive football,” Ryan said. “Just seeing things from a different perspective, I feel like I made big jumps in the two years we were together, and I’m happy for him that he’s having great success. He works his *** off. He works extremely hard. He’s one of those guys, he’s grinding all week.”

Sunday will be a special one for many of the 49ers who have Falcons ties. Even McGlinchey has a close tie in this game as he and Ryan are cousins. McGlinchey called this upcoming game “a fun little bragging rights kind of week.”

LaFleur and McDaniel said seeing coaches and players they spent two long years with will be meaningful. While the teams are on opposite paths, they’re still linked closely.

McDaniel, who began his coaching career as an intern with the Denver Broncos in 2005, remembered how Quinn’s approach changed his thinking about the profession. It’s something he feels has been carried over with the 49ers, which has helped make them successful this season.

“Really, the entire culture he created in Atlanta, that is something that won’t ever get away from me,” McDaniel said. “You can enjoy doing your job. This is what we’ve aspired to do our entire lives — players and coaches. The stress can overwhelm people. With Coach Quinn, he’d be like, ‘This is not good enough, this is not up to our standard. But hey, if we do this, we’re totally capable. Let’s go have fun doing it.’ It’s the idea of creating a family — as he coined it in Atlanta, a ‘brotherhood.’ That’s something blasted me across the face. His emphasis with that and the way he conducted that was very impactful and I don’t think will ever leave me.”

 

https://theathletic.com/1456675/2019/12/12/this-scheme-is-a-dream-how-kyle-shanahans-time-with-falcons-helped-shape-49ers

Sighs come back shanny....come back :(

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1 hour ago, R_The_Great said:

It's sad we couldn't find a legit solution for the offense all these years.  We knew what worked and we just let it go every way possible

No legit solution you say?  
 

Falcons were unimpressed with Matt LaFleur, Mike McDaniel’s work, and let them walk before hiring Steve Sarkisian

Now that the wheels have completely fallen off of the Falcons offense, we’ve been wondering why Dan Quinn didn’t just promote Matt LaFleur.

 

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10 minutes ago, FalconsIn2012 said:

No legit solution you say?  
 

Falcons were unimpressed with Matt LaFleur, Mike McDaniel’s work, and let them walk before hiring Steve Sarkisian

Now that the wheels have completely fallen off of the Falcons offense, we’ve been wondering why Dan Quinn didn’t just promote Matt LaFleur.

 

Pretty sure neither of them were ready to be an OC in 2017. 

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1 hour ago, BCEagleATLFalcon said:

I have such mixed feelings about KS. He's simultaneously the mastermind behind the most exciting/fun offense to watch in my entire Falcons fandom, the offensive genius who took us to a Super Bowl .... and the arrogant SOB who (with Quinn's quiet blessing) cost us our first ring.

I hate him. 

And if he wanted to come back as our head coach, I'd be dancing in the streets.

 

My sentiment exactly. Since I live in the SF Bay area, I'm bombarded with 9er talk, especially this season. And its slowly killing me inside

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10 minutes ago, Vandy said:

Pretty sure neither of them were ready to be an OC in 2017. 

They would have been more ready than Sark was in 2017.  And the familiarity, especially between Ryan & LaFleur would have helped the transition.

LaFleur was solid for the Rams as OC in 2017 despite not calling the plays.  I suspect he would have done quite well.  He would have retained McDaniel (a genius) as run game coordinator

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41 minutes ago, FalconsIn2012 said:

They would have been more ready than Sark was in 2017.  And the familiarity, especially between Ryan & LaFleur would have helped the transition.

LaFleur was solid for the Rams as OC in 2017 despite not calling the plays.  I suspect he would have done quite well.  He would have retained McDaniel (a genius) as run game coordinator

My bad, I misread. Thought article was discussing brother Mike LaFleur, not Matt. 
 

I agree, Matt should have been given 1st opp to replace Shanny at OC. 

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I'll put it like this. When Quinn was hired, Shanny was part of a package deal as his OC or no dice. Quinn knew EXACTLY what he wanted because Shanny's offense was the hardest to defend in Quinn's mind. Guess what, it arguably is right now 4 years later. Quinn was right when he said that and it showed in '16 despite going through growing pains in '15. Quinn was right then and still is, however where he went wrong and what led to his downfall and most likely his eventual firing is not hiring/promoting within somebody that shared the way Shanny and Quinn thought would lead to the most offensive success. Not saying it's easy replacing Shanny, but hiring Sark and Koetter were completely wrong moves that will cost Quinn his job. Mark it down.

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3 hours ago, The Don™ said:

I'll put it like this. When Quinn was hired, Shanny was part of a package deal as his OC or no dice. Quinn knew EXACTLY what he wanted because Shanny's offense was the hardest to defend in Quinn's mind. Guess what, it arguably is right now 4 years later. Quinn was right when he said that and it showed in '16 despite going through growing pains in '15. Quinn was right then and still is, however where he went wrong and what led to his downfall and most likely his eventual firing is not hiring/promoting within somebody that shared the way Shanny and Quinn thought would lead to the most offensive success. Not saying it's easy replacing Shanny, but hiring Sark and Koetter were completely wrong moves that will cost Quinn his job. Mark it down.

You are making that statement with hindsight though, and it still may not be totally true. Thinking that LaFleur and McDaniel would have been able to replicate shanahan’s system is an unknowable. 

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4 hours ago, The Don™ said:

I'll put it like this. When Quinn was hired, Shanny was part of a package deal as his OC or no dice. Quinn knew EXACTLY what he wanted because Shanny's offense was the hardest to defend in Quinn's mind. Guess what, it arguably is right now 4 years later. Quinn was right when he said that and it showed in '16 despite going through growing pains in '15. Quinn was right then and still is, however where he went wrong and what led to his downfall and most likely his eventual firing is not hiring/promoting within somebody that shared the way Shanny and Quinn thought would lead to the most offensive success. Not saying it's easy replacing Shanny, but hiring Sark and Koetter were completely wrong moves that will cost Quinn his job. Mark it down.

I’ll never understand the Koetter re-hire.

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7 hours ago, FalconsIn2012 said:

No legit solution you say?  
 

Falcons were unimpressed with Matt LaFleur, Mike McDaniel’s work, and let them walk before hiring Steve Sarkisian

Now that the wheels have completely fallen off of the Falcons offense, we’ve been wondering why Dan Quinn didn’t just promote Matt LaFleur.

 

Packers offense: 23.8 ppg

Falcons offense: 23.1 ppg

 

Why are we pretending the Packers offense is setting the world on fire?

They have scored a whopping 8 more points than us and I'd almost guarantee they've had a lot more chances to do so

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1 hour ago, FalconFanSince1969 said:

Packers offense: 23.8 ppg

Falcons offense: 23.1 ppg

 

Why are we pretending the Packers offense is setting the world on fire?

They have scored a whopping 8 more points than us and I'd almost guarantee they've had a lot more chances to do so

Outside of Devonta Adams most couldn’t name a receiver on their team.  We literally have better skill position players across the board.  Do like their OL, though

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5 hours ago, BlazerSlayer said:

A lot of people now say they wanted KS as head coach, but there was no way DQ would be fired after Super Bowl and KS promoted. No way. I agree they should have promoted LaFleur etc and I would love to know the real reasons they didnt.

Im saying if Blank was truly smart, Kyle would have been our hc from the beginning and Quinn could have been the dc.. We would probably have a Superbowl win by now and most definitely be in contention this season.. But with Quinn we just have a handful of turds

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