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Better Call Saul season 5

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I feel like the only reason Kim wasn't completely shocked and horrified that Jimmy went straight from the courthouse that morning to "being a friend of the cartel" is she's decided that she can handle what he gets into as long as he's open with her about it. That right there is a tragic mistake. She made a decision based on her faith in herself as someone that can overcome the kind of betrayal she just suffered, not someone getting married to someone because they're ready and want to take the next step. Bad, bad move, and the writers made it apparent right away.

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So this next episode, Vince Gilligan directed it.  And it is supposed to be the Ozymandias of this series.

Can.  Not.  Wait.

"What’s been hinted as potentially the highlight of the season will come with Episode 8, 'Bagman,' an opus directed by Gilligan. Gould calls it 'physically, a very difficult episode for us to do.'

'Vince said several times to me that it was the hardest directing [he has] ever done. When you see it, you’ll understand why. As this season goes on, ‘Better Call Saul’ as a show, for better or for worse, changes a bit. And we go to some new places,' he explains."

https://variety.com/2020/tv/features/better-call-saul-season-5-showrunner-peter-gould-vince-gilligan-1203510585/

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Anyone else impressed with how deftly they tied up the 2 prior marriage issue?

No muss, no fuss. Just an otherwise irrelevant detail. “Do you have documentation of the 2 prior dissolutions?”  “Yes ma’am.”

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Kim shirtless. Yeah.

The entire series is hinges around Jimmy's transformation into Saul, and we've said 100 times already it's happened, but it was depicted visually in two different scenes last night: 1. Jimmy, wracked with guilt after looking at the victim's family, the sounds of court drowning out of his hearing, then (without showing him stand up) suddenly Saul is standing and confidently barking about the manufactured evidence of his client; 2. Jimmy talking to Howard, and Saul coming out and yelling at Howard that he's a god in flesh with lightning coming out of his fingers.

And sandwiched between those was the brilliant shot of half of Jimmy's face peaking behind the corner of the marble wall (with hit reflect to make his face "whole") watching again with guilt the pain of the family learning Lalo is making bail.

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2 minutes ago, mdrake34 said:

Kim shirtless. Yeah.

The entire series is hinges around Jimmy's transformation into Saul, and we've said 100 times already it's happened, but it was depicted visually in two different scenes last night: 1. Jimmy, wracked with guilt after looking at the victim's family, the sounds of court drowning out of his hearing, then (without showing him stand up) suddenly Saul is standing and confidently barking about the manufactured evidence of his client; 2. Jimmy talking to Howard, and Saul coming out and yelling at Howard that he's a god in flesh with lightning coming out of his fingers.

And sandwiched between those was the brilliant shot of half of Jimmy's face peaking behind the corner of the marble wall (with hit reflect to make his face "whole") watching again with guilt the pain of the family learning Lalo is making bail.

The saddest thing about that middle scene (the half-face scene) is per the demands of justice, bail is appropriate.  What is bad is not that justice is done, but that Jimmy knows what Lalo did, and he knows he's guilty of it, and he knows he's helping him get out of it on a sheer technicality.  And instead of being an upstanding lawyer and saying "this is how the system is designed to work," the little bit of Jimmy left in there wants to throw it.  He wants Lalo to pay.  He wants justice.  

It is his abandonment of justice at any cost in service of his client that is the great irony.  Slippin' Jimmy didn't hurt people as he sees it.  Suckers deserve it, and he's just making sure the right thing happens.  Saul Goodman will hurt anyone to serve his client.  Jimmy is turning into a real lawyer, one who uses the adversarial system to ferret out the correct result, but one without scruples or rules or procedure to bind him.  It's the worst possible combination of traits.  The abandonment of any subjective sense of right and wrong, but also unencumbered by little trivialities (as he sees them) like rules and procedure and process.  

He's a chimp with a machine gun.  Chuck had it right.  When he finally sees that he represents his client first and foremost, it is not with a sense of decorum and propriety.  It's with lightning bolts coming out of his fingertips, a god in human clothing.  He travels in worlds real lawyers (like Howard) can't even imagine.  Ones where you cheat and lie and steal, but to a different end than getting it right.

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1 minute ago, JDaveG said:

The saddest thing about that middle scene (the half-face scene) is per the demands of justice, bail is appropriate.  What is bad is not that justice is done, but that Jimmy knows what Lalo did, and he knows he's guilty of it, and he knows he's helping him get out of it on a sheer technicality.  And instead of being an upstanding lawyer and saying "this is how the system is designed to work," the little bit of Jimmy left in there wants to throw it.  He wants Lalo to pay.  He wants justice.  

It is his abandonment of justice at any cost in service of his client that is the great irony.  Slippin' Jimmy didn't hurt people as he sees it.  Suckers deserve it, and he's just making sure the right thing happens.  Saul Goodman will hurt anyone to serve his client.  Jimmy is turning into a real lawyer, one who uses the adversarial system to ferret out the correct result, but one without scruples or rules or procedure to bind him.  It's the worst possible combination of traits.  The abandonment of any subjective sense of right and wrong, but also unencumbered by little trivialities (as he sees them) like rules and procedure and process.  

He's a chimp with a machine gun.  Chuck had it right.  When he finally sees that he represents his client first and foremost, it is not with a sense of decorum and propriety.  It's with lightning bolts coming out of his fingertips, a god in human clothing.  He travels in worlds real lawyers (like Howard) can't even imagine.  Ones where you cheat and lie and steal, but to a different end than getting it right.

He has already dipped his toes into the ethical violations of acting in the best interests of the people paying his fees, and not his own criminal clients (Krazy-8), but now we'll see competing instructions from Lalo and Mike on how to represent Lalo. They both have the goal of him making bail, which he's accomplished, but for much different reasons.

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3 minutes ago, mdrake34 said:

He has already dipped his toes into the ethical violations of acting in the best interests of the people paying his fees, and not his own criminal clients (Krazy-8), but now we'll see competing instructions from Lalo and Mike on how to represent Lalo. They both have the goal of him making bail, which he's accomplished, but for much different reasons.

Correct.  The process of representing your client without regard to who is paying the bill is unimportant to him.  He's getting paid to get results for the people paying him.

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9 minutes ago, JDaveG said:

Correct.  The process of representing your client without regard to who is paying the bill is unimportant to him.  He's getting paid to get results for the people paying him.

We know he doesn't wind up becoming "a friend of the cartel," and still isn't fully aware of what Gus does in the early parts of BB.  So it will be interesting to see how this plays out.  Assuming he wasn't lying when Walt and Jessie took him to the desert, and both Nacho are still alive in BB, I wonder if Lalo flees south of the border once he makes bail before Mike and Nacho can kill him (although they can't kill him while he's north of the border).

I had forgotten we saw Schuler in BB.  That entire scene was bizarre. 

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3 minutes ago, mdrake34 said:

We know he doesn't wind up becoming "a friend of the cartel," and still isn't fully aware of what Gus does in the early parts of BB.  So it will be interesting to see how this plays out.  Assuming he wasn't lying when Walt and Jessie took him to the desert, and both Nacho are still alive in BB, I wonder if Lalo flees south of the border once he makes bail before Mike and Nacho can kill him (although they can't kill him while he's north of the border).

I think they're expecting he will go back, where they further expect the cartel will take care of him, something "a guy who knows a guy who knows another guy" wouldn't necessarily tell the lawyer who got him bail.  So my take is when Walt and Jesse take him to the desert, he thinks Lalo is still alive, maybe he's even been obsessing about it for a while, paranoid that one day the dime will drop.

"Ignacio, he's the one" doesn't really presume Nacho is dead or alive.  It could be either.  

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I like how he told Kim last week that it was her plan, and this week he accused Howard of killing Chuck to his face, then called him bacterium. He's developing the traits of an actor/director that's too arrogant to work with anyone. If Chuck was an actor, Jimmy would be making a living tearing down film students at a community college. 

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Interesting tidbit about Gus and his past thrown to us via the meeting in the hotel room. He recounts what the Madrigal bigwig "Did for them" when their backs were against the wall...suggests Gus and his lover (what was his name, the scientist Hector kills at the pool?) were about to be harmed by the Pinochet regime in Chile when this guy intervened...

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I had become convinced Kim would leave Jimmy vs becoming a casualty of the drug war, but now that she’s met Lalo and Mike said “she’s in the game now” I’m beginning to wonder if she doesn’t meet a tragic end. 

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