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FalconsIn2012

Sportac: Falcons Approaching Salary CAP Helll:

91 posts in this topic

Edit: See the 9th post for the article:

This is something I’ve said a few times.  It’s not popular, but I believe it is true.  Messages grow stale.  Turnover is actually a good thing.  Secure your top 5-6 core players and the rest are chess pieces.

The Falcons fell in love with their own product and paid too many of their own players.  The best way to win, IMO, is to have the most players earning over $1,000,000

Every single season the Patriots have the most players earning over a million dollars. And it’s not even close. They prefer a balanced overall roster. They may not have the best players one through 10. But 11 through 30 are by far the best in the business. This gives them flexibility within their scheme. Heading into training camp they had 11 players in their secondary earning over $1 million.  And the last few years, The team that faces them in the Super Bowl is ranked second, third, fourth, or fifth in players earning over $1 million.

We are far too top heavy.  130 million of our 200 million CAP is spent on out top 8 contracts next year.  That’s 66%.  The Patriots are at 77 million on their top 8.  Add Brady and it is 95 million.  That’s an extra 35 million to play around with to make their team better...keep the roster churned and the message on point.

This offseason was so incredibly odd.  We have a top 8 offense yet spend our first 3 rounds of draft capital on offense (not a DQ decision IMO).  Dan Quinn is a 4-3 Under specialist with a pedigree in Cover 3 or multiple Cover 1 looks.  Soon as he takes over playcalling we go with odd man fronts.  
 

We want to keep Shanny/Sark/Falcons offensive playbook but hire two guys with no WCO pedigree who have to learn on the fly.  Keep Sark...hire Bevell or Scangarello.  Make a play for daddy Shannahan or McDaniels from SF.  Better yet, wait two weeks and hire Kubiak. Makes no sense.  We have all of  our Coordinators coaching outside their wheelhouse.  Outside their comfort zone.  I honestly believe it was the offseason of Blank so I hold him accountable for this mess.  Quinn has not shown he is capable of running both the defense and the team. That right is reserved for people like Belichick, Reid, SP and apparently Shanahan.  Quinn simply looks overwhelmed and lacking confidence.

We have great talent on this team but not great leaders… The message has gone stale. Dan Quinn knows how to coach defense but you would never know it.  A great opportunity was lost with this team over the last three years and it is unfortunate for us lifelong falcons fans.

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@Ergo Proxy dosnt believe our cap is an issue.. Im sure he'd like to pay Ryan a little more money to get the extra productivity out of him..

But ive been saying for months our cap is too far off balance and we'll never win until its resolved 

Id love to see us 60% defense and 40% offense. I know u have to sprinkle in some ST in that.. But just for simplicity 

Edited by ⚡Slumerican⚡
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What I find sad is that TD was brought here to emulate the Patriot's model, and he has done basically the opposite. Blank who hired him to do that has also done the exact opposite.

Imagine it's SB week and a system RB for the Patriots who are playing in the big game demands to be paid via a proxy relative. Not only would he NOT have been paid, he probably would have sat out the SB and the Patriots would win anyway.

Imagine a Patriots WR already a huge contract decided to hold out and subtlety demand to be the highest paid receiver in the league despite being under aforementioned contract.. he would have been sent packing, and the Patriots would come back and still make the SB the next season.

We said we were going to copy the Patriots model and then basically did the exact opposite of what they would do at every turn.

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5 hours ago, TheUsualStuff said:

 

What I find sad is that TD was brought here to emulate the Patriot's model, and he has done basically the opposite. Blank who hired him to do that has also done the exact opposite.

Imagine it's SB week and a system RB for the Patriots who are playing in the big game demands to be paid via a proxy relative. Not only would he NOT have been paid, he probably would have sat out the SB and the Patriots would win anyway.

Imagine a Patriots WR already a huge contract decided to hold out and subtlety demand to be the highest paid receiver in the league despite being under aforementioned contract.. he would have been sent packing, and the Patriots would come back and still make the SB the next season.

We said we were going to copy the Patriots model and then basically did the exact opposite of what they would do at every turn.

TD has built some strong rosters.  I can’t fault him.  Outside of 2013 & 2014 his rosters were playoff worthy.  Even those years, if we are healthy we quite possibly make the playoffs. That means we make the playoffs every single year but 2015 and 2018.  That’s an impressive 11 year stretch.



 

But I think signing Matthews, Brown, Carpenter & Freeman were mistakes.  Hiring Koetter was a mistake...and firing MM may have been too (but I think Blank mandated that, though)

 

But watching the Saints win without Brees & Kamara is frustrating.  They win with scheme.  Just like we did in 2016.  Just like the 49ers & Packers are now.  On the downs that we currently win, it’s because we have better players, not better coaches

 

And I’m laughing at everyone who said Thomas isn’t an elite receiver.  200 yards up on JJ atm.  Dude is the best receiver in short space in football.  He knows how to get open quickly and always catches the football.  80% catch rate once again is incredible.  He is once again about the average 80% catch rate… The only player to do that since 1980 is John Taylor at 78%

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Brady is paid under the table and BB outsmarts every coach he faces. Really tough to duplicate. Their OL also takes nobodies and makes them good. What other teams can do that?

Its really tough to replicate. Most teams have to keep their stars. This team isn’t lacking talent. It’s lacking coaching. Specifically defensive coaching. 

There’s no doubt in my mind if Wade Phillips was our current DC we’d be 6-1. 

Only Pats philosophy I would adopt is not paying for WRs or RBs unless you have a HOFer. Accumulate picks, sign one year deals for comp picks and lock up your young studs. 

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46 minutes ago, NeonDeion said:

Brady is paid under the table and BB outsmarts every coach he faces. Really tough to duplicate. Their OL also takes nobodies and makes them good. What other teams can do that?

Its really tough to replicate. Most teams have to keep their stars. This team isn’t lacking talent. It’s lacking coaching. Specifically defensive coaching. 

There’s no doubt in my mind if Wade Phillips was our current DC we’d be 6-1. 

Only Pats philosophy I would adopt is not paying for WRs or RBs unless you have a HOFer. Accumulate picks, sign one year deals for comp picks and lock up your young studs. 

I think that’s an easy excuse not to try and replicate the Pats.

Did he outsmart the Seahawks and then the Falcons?   Or did he simply let us and the Hawks outsmart ourselves?

  While he coached the team that was  came back from 28-3, he also coached the team that allowed a team to get down 25 points in 40 minutes of football.

Much of the Belichick philosophy is simple common sense.  Isn’t it easier to outfox teams week to week if you have more depth?  More players to run multiple schemes week-to-week?  
 

He does that by sacrificing elite talent in favor of quality, dependable pieces across the board. . I screamed for us to grab Jamie Collins for 2-3 million.  They got him for 1 million and he will make the pro bowl.  Belichick is the best in the business...the best there ever was, and quite possibly the best there ever will be… But much of his aura is simple common sense.  Accumulate draft picks, scout other teams possible castoff’s etc...put your players into a position to utilize their skill set. And don’t be afraid to make hard decisions & cut players otherwise loved by the team and fans

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1 hour ago, Falcons In 2012 said:

I think that’s an easy excuse not to try and replicate the Pats.

Did he outsmart the Seahawks and then the Falcons?   Or did he simply let us and the Hawks outsmart ourselves?

  While he coached the team that was  came back from 28-3, he also coached the team that allowed a team to get down 25 points in 40 minutes of football.

Much of the Belichick philosophy is simple common sense.  Isn’t it easier to outfox teams week to week if you have more depth?  More players to run multiple schemes week-to-week?  
 

He does that by sacrificing elite talent in favor of quality, dependable pieces across the board. . I screamed for us to grab Jamie Collins for 2-3 million.  They got him for 1 million and he will make the pro bowl.  Belichick is the best in the business...the best there ever was, and quite possibly the best there ever will be… But much of his aura is simple common sense.  Accumulate draft picks, scout other teams possible castoff’s etc...put your players into a position to utilize their skill set. And don’t be afraid to make hard decisions & cut players otherwise loved by the team and fans

There’s definitely things to be copied but he also gets a lot out of basic nobody guys from other teams and gets them playing a level higher. 

His smartest move which no one copies is reserving big money for one year signings - game changers, then he lets them go for a comp pick. 

He doesn’t need to pay for long term when he can get Revis, Moss, Brown on one year deals. 

I really love what he does with WRs and RBs. He loads up on speedy guys and versatile backs and knows the castoffs will do just find behind that OL and Brady. 

Matt Ryan would be the same way with a good OL and not having to keep changing systems. 

I love me Julio and was a great trade for a HOFer. But from a positional standpoint, I’d rather have had Watt/Donald/Cox and rolled with more second tier WRs like Sanu 

Edited by NeonDeion

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Sportac Agrees:

 

The Atlanta Falcons Prepare to Enter Salary Cap **** in 2020

As the Falcons fell to 1-6 with the 37-10 loss to a Rams team that was on a three game skid, I was inspired to turn towards 2020 to look at how this Falcons team and their terrible defense can potentially make a change.

Currently, they’re slated to be $8.7 million over the cap and largely because of some massive investments at the top of their salary cap. And that’s before you take into account the $9.6 million team is currently projected to spend on their 2020 draft picks.

Matt Ryan and Julio Jones will consume 27% of their cap in 2020. Steve Young and Jerry Rice set the Super Bowl record for a champion’s Top 2 cap expenses at 21.84% in 1994. Young’s cap hit of 13.1% is the highest cap hit for any Super Bowl champion in the 25 seasons of the salary cap era.

An astute 49ers organization re-signed 17 players in December 1993 to avoid the cap, so they kind of cheated the cap. This makes Matt Ryan’s 16.8% cap hit, and the QB market rates in general, even more crazy.

If you add Jake Matthews, Grady Jarrett, and Desmond Trufant, the Falcons top 5 cap hits will consume 50.6% of the cap. The Super Bowl record was set by the 2002 Bucs. Warren Sapp, Brad Johnson, Simeon Rice, Derrick Brooks, and Jeff Christy combined for 38.4% of the cap.

 

If you add Alex Mack, Deion Jones, Devonta Freeman, Mohammad Sanu, and Ricardo Allen, the Falcons top 10 cap hits consume a shocking 73.6% of the cap.

 

The 2015 Broncos have the cap era record for champions in spending 62.3% of the cap on Peyton Manning, Demaryius Thomas, Ryan Clady, Von Miller, Demarcus Ware, Aqib Talib, Louis Vasquez, Emmanuel Sanders, and Chris Harris, Jr.

Demaryius Thomas’ cap hit of 9.2% is the record for wide receivers and #2 cap hits on champions. Jones’ cap hit of 10.2% will be a percentage point higher.

When you consider why the Falcons defense is so horrible, you can look towards the low-percentage situation they’ve put themselves in. They were heavily reliant on too many low-probability things working out for them.

For offensive skill players, Ryan, Jones, Freeman, and Sanu consume 35.8% of the cap. Add Matthews and Mack, the team has 49% invested in six veteran offensive players. The team spent a first round pick in 2018 on another receiver, Calvin Ridley. There is so much invested in this offense and it has impacted the defense.

Over the last two seasons, an organization that has known defense was a weakness since their Super Bowl loss to the Patriots, has invested three first round picks in offensive players over the last two years: Ridley, plus linemen Chris Lindstrom and Kaleb McGary.

In the five drafts since 2015, the team has only had 32 draft picks, that’s eight less than the league average. Eight less opportunities to draft defensive players and instead have to take a larger chance on an undrafted player.

The team has become fully committed to their strategy for success: pass for more production than anyone else. It’s a valid idea for a strategy for success, but we’ve already seen Drew Brees play out this 7-9 reality when his defenses were terrible from 2012 through 2016.

It feels like some tough decisions should have been made over the last couple years like recognizing the crazy investment totals in 2020 and the likely need to trade Julio Jones who wanted a new contract.

He’s having a good season by anyone’s standards, but before this week, he’s already a bad value for the team as he’s produced about $12 million in value versus his $22 million average per year. That’s $22 million number is based on the player Jones was in his late-20s, the end of a receivers prime years. It’s not based in the reality of who he will be in the future.

 

Trufant is producing $9.4 million in value below his contract value, so two big investments aren’t working out great. Add the rest of the group in though too. Jarrett, Mack, Allen, Ryan, Matthews, Freeman, and Deion Jones are all producing below their value. Sanu is the only player in the Top 10 producing more than his contract value.

This is just an unfortunate truth of NFL contracts. Most second contracts will be proven to be bad values by Jason’s standard because of the extremely undervalued prices of everyone who basically contributes at all while on a rookie contract.

What the organization seemed to fail to recognize in all of this is the value that Kyle Shanahan provided to the organization during that 2016 season. Ryan and Jones had similarly massive cap hits during that year, but because of that trademark Shanahan offense, he was able to pull out the most extreme value out of that offense. The defense was still poor, but Shanahan made their offense the NFL’s highest scoring, not just the most prolific at passing.

That offense was ranked fifth in rushing with Freeman and Tevin Coleman leading an attack that ran for 4.6 per carry, rather than the 3.8 it’s churning at this year. It’s no secret that the Shanahan offense is terrific.

 

Even with Shanahan though, this 2020 team would be in a lot of trouble. The issue with spending $146.7 million on your Top 10 is an over-reliance on accepting sub-optimal players on the rest of the roster due to costs. Atlanta already has $3 million in dead money costs next year with potentially more dead money charges to come considering the need to get under the cap next year.

If the salary cap is $200 million, the Falcons have $51 million, or just 25.5% of the cap, to spend on the 43 other roster spots. That’s just $1.19 million or 0.59% of the cap per player to invest.

The team currently has just 40 players under contract AND they’re already projected to be over by $18.3 million when factoring in draft picks!

After the Top 10 players, the team has 12 players making over $1 million. When factoring in those 12 players, the Top 22 cap hits for the Falcons consume all but $1.95 million of a $200 million cap.

 

So an NFL team has 53 players on a roster, the Falcons are spending $198.05 million on 22 players, plus dead money. This leaves the team with $1.95 million for 31 players, which leaves $62,903 per player.

If the team does a complete fire sale and moves on from Mack, Freeman, Sanu, Allen, Keanu Neal, and Allen Bailey, that saves $32.125 million, which brings that total to $34.075 million in cap space. That’s still just $1.1 million per player, which, especially considering all the talent they’d be ridding themselves of in that scenario, likely makes them one of the worst teams in the NFL next year.

I have no idea what the Falcons are going to do to right the ship right now and I don’t think they do either.

Welcome to salary cap ****. We’ve been waiting for you.

Zack Moore is a certified NFL agent, a writer for OverTheCap.com and OnnitGymMMA.com, as well as the author of “Caponomics: Building Super Bowl Champions,” a book that breaks down how Super Bowl champions are built in the NFL’s salary cap era and discusses how NFL front offices can best allocate resources to create successful teams.

You can follow him on Twitter at @ZackMooreNFL. You can subscribe to The Zack Moore Show podcast here.

 

@FalconFanSince1970

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Falconsin2012 said:

I think signing Matthews, Brown, Carpenter & Freeman were mistakes.  Hiring Koetter was a mistake...and firing MM may have been too (but I think Blank mandated that, though)

Yes, it appears that the Falcons acted desperately, but the real mistake was not investing intelligently in the OL over several years.  We basically ignored the OL for quite some time and believed that the skill players would make up for the OL's short comings.  

Once it became clear that the OL was garbage, and that our stars were beginning to age, we panicked and bought two FA OL's and double-dipped in the draft.  

This is nothing more than poor roster planning.  TD has some good qualities, but he is poor at planning and building a roster for the long haul.

 

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2 minutes ago, etherdome said:

Falconsin2012 said:

I think signing Matthews, Brown, Carpenter & Freeman were mistakes.  Hiring Koetter was a mistake...and firing MM may have been too (but I think Blank mandated that, though)

Yes, it appears that the Falcons acted desperately, but the real mistake was not investing intelligently in the OL over several years.  We basically ignored the OL for quite some time and believed that the skill players would make up for the OL's short comings.  

Once it became clear that the OL was garbage, and that our stars were beginning to age, we panicked and bought two FA OL's and double-dipped in the draft.  

This is nothing more than poor roster planning.  TD has some good qualities, but he is poor at planning and building a roster for the long haul.

 

Solid point.  But I don’t think we ignored our OL.  We used FA for OL and drafted for defense.  The strategy almost worked on 2016 and served us well in 2017

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Just now, FalconsIn2012 said:

Solid point.  But I don’t think we ignored our OL.  We used FA for OL and drafted for defense.  The strategy almost worked on 2016 and served us well in 2017

When I say "invested in the OL", I mean slowly developing a good OL over several years.  To do that, you have to draft smartly and you have to have a good OL coach.  We have done neither.  

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2 minutes ago, Jesus said:

OL is fine if Koetter didn't require Matt to wait 6-10 seconds before throwing the ball downfield. 

OL is not fine. I rarely every see Matt with a clean pocket. Dudes are getting pushed back immediately from the snap

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4 hours ago, NeonDeion said:

There’s definitely things to be copied but he also gets a lot out of basic nobody guys from other teams and gets them playing a level higher. 

His smartest move which no one copies is reserving big money for one year signings - game changers, then he lets them go for a comp pick. 

He doesn’t need to pay for long term when he can get Revis, Moss, Brown on one year deals. 

I really love what he does with WRs and RBs. He loads up on speedy guys and versatile backs and knows the castoffs will do just find behind that OL and Brady. 

Matt Ryan would be the same way with a good OL and not having to keep changing systems. 

I love me Julio and was a great trade for a HOFer. But from a positional standpoint, I’d rather have had Watt/Donald/Cox and rolled with more second tier WRs like Sanu 

The problem is it's not that simple.  Stars will take a 1-year deal because they have a 50-50 shot at winning a Super Bowl.  What other team can make that claim, the answer is none.  So while in theory it's easy, it isn't actually practical for 31 other teams in the NFL since the championship pull isn't there.

Bill gets more out of every player than any coach in NFL history.

6 hours ago, FalconsIn2012 said:

I think that’s an easy excuse not to try and replicate the Pats.

Did he outsmart the Seahawks and then the Falcons?   Or did he simply let us and the Hawks outsmart ourselves?

  While he coached the team that was  came back from 28-3, he also coached the team that allowed a team to get down 25 points in 40 minutes of football.

Much of the Belichick philosophy is simple common sense.  Isn’t it easier to outfox teams week to week if you have more depth?  More players to run multiple schemes week-to-week?  
 

He does that by sacrificing elite talent in favor of quality, dependable pieces across the board. . I screamed for us to grab Jamie Collins for 2-3 million.  They got him for 1 million and he will make the pro bowl.  Belichick is the best in the business...the best there ever was, and quite possibly the best there ever will be… But much of his aura is simple common sense.  Accumulate draft picks, scout other teams possible castoff’s etc...put your players into a position to utilize their skill set. And don’t be afraid to make hard decisions & cut players otherwise loved by the team and fans

Most coaches can barely manage to coach one scheme effectively, look at the Falcons as exhibit A.  While the overall concept may be "simple" there is a reason no other coach has been able to come close to replicating what Bill can do.  He has more knowledge in one pinky than any other coach has total knowledge.

He also simply takes no name players and finds a way to make them something and puts them in a niche position.  The Patriots "depth" would be atrocious under any other NFL coach, Bill is just capable of putting them in positions to succeed because he knows every tiny detail.

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8 minutes ago, capologist said:

Spotrac doesn't agree, they copy OTC and ride their coattails...

I know you hate Sportac, but they numbers are straight forward here.  The bolded paints a pretty bleak picture.  Don’t you think?

51 minutes ago, FalconsIn2012 said:

Sportac Agrees:

 

The Atlanta Falcons Prepare to Enter Salary Cap **** in 2020

As the Falcons fell to 1-6 with the 37-10 loss to a Rams team that was on a three game skid, I was inspired to turn towards 2020 to look at how this Falcons team and their terrible defense can potentially make a change.

Currently, they’re slated to be $8.7 million over the cap and largely because of some massive investments at the top of their salary cap. And that’s before you take into account the $9.6 million team is currently projected to spend on their 2020 draft picks.

Matt Ryan and Julio Jones will consume 27% of their cap in 2020. Steve Young and Jerry Rice set the Super Bowl record for a champion’s Top 2 cap expenses at 21.84% in 1994. Young’s cap hit of 13.1% is the highest cap hit for any Super Bowl champion in the 25 seasons of the salary cap era.

An astute 49ers organization re-signed 17 players in December 1993 to avoid the cap, so they kind of cheated the cap. This makes Matt Ryan’s 16.8% cap hit, and the QB market rates in general, even more crazy.

If you add Jake Matthews, Grady Jarrett, and Desmond Trufant, the Falcons top 5 cap hits will consume 50.6% of the cap. The Super Bowl record was set by the 2002 Bucs. Warren Sapp, Brad Johnson, Simeon Rice, Derrick Brooks, and Jeff Christy combined for 38.4% of the cap.

 

If you add Alex Mack, Deion Jones, Devonta Freeman, Mohammad Sanu, and Ricardo Allen, the Falcons top 10 cap hits consume a shocking 73.6% of the cap.

 

The 2015 Broncos have the cap era record for champions in spending 62.3% of the cap on Peyton Manning, Demaryius Thomas, Ryan Clady, Von Miller, Demarcus Ware, Aqib Talib, Louis Vasquez, Emmanuel Sanders, and Chris Harris, Jr.

Demaryius Thomas’ cap hit of 9.2% is the record for wide receivers and #2 cap hits on champions. Jones’ cap hit of 10.2% will be a percentage point higher.

When you consider why the Falcons defense is so horrible, you can look towards the low-percentage situation they’ve put themselves in. They were heavily reliant on too many low-probability things working out for them.

For offensive skill players, Ryan, Jones, Freeman, and Sanu consume 35.8% of the cap. Add Matthews and Mack, the team has 49% invested in six veteran offensive players. The team spent a first round pick in 2018 on another receiver, Calvin Ridley. There is so much invested in this offense and it has impacted the defense.

Over the last two seasons, an organization that has known defense was a weakness since their Super Bowl loss to the Patriots, has invested three first round picks in offensive players over the last two years: Ridley, plus linemen Chris Lindstrom and Kaleb McGary.

In the five drafts since 2015, the team has only had 32 draft picks, that’s eight less than the league average. Eight less opportunities to draft defensive players and instead have to take a larger chance on an undrafted player.

The team has become fully committed to their strategy for success: pass for more production than anyone else. It’s a valid idea for a strategy for success, but we’ve already seen Drew Brees play out this 7-9 reality when his defenses were terrible from 2012 through 2016.

It feels like some tough decisions should have been made over the last couple years like recognizing the crazy investment totals in 2020 and the likely need to trade Julio Jones who wanted a new contract.

He’s having a good season by anyone’s standards, but before this week, he’s already a bad value for the team as he’s produced about $12 million in value versus his $22 million average per year. That’s $22 million number is based on the player Jones was in his late-20s, the end of a receivers prime years. It’s not based in the reality of who he will be in the future.

 

Trufant is producing $9.4 million in value below his contract value, so two big investments aren’t working out great. Add the rest of the group in though too. Jarrett, Mack, Allen, Ryan, Matthews, Freeman, and Deion Jones are all producing below their value. Sanu is the only player in the Top 10 producing more than his contract value.

This is just an unfortunate truth of NFL contracts. Most second contracts will be proven to be bad values by Jason’s standard because of the extremely undervalued prices of everyone who basically contributes at all while on a rookie contract.

What the organization seemed to fail to recognize in all of this is the value that Kyle Shanahan provided to the organization during that 2016 season. Ryan and Jones had similarly massive cap hits during that year, but because of that trademark Shanahan offense, he was able to pull out the most extreme value out of that offense. The defense was still poor, but Shanahan made their offense the NFL’s highest scoring, not just the most prolific at passing.

That offense was ranked fifth in rushing with Freeman and Tevin Coleman leading an attack that ran for 4.6 per carry, rather than the 3.8 it’s churning at this year. It’s no secret that the Shanahan offense is terrific.

 

Even with Shanahan though, this 2020 team would be in a lot of trouble. The issue with spending $146.7 million on your Top 10 is an over-reliance on accepting sub-optimal players on the rest of the roster due to costs. Atlanta already has $3 million in dead money costs next year with potentially more dead money charges to come considering the need to get under the cap next year.

If the salary cap is $200 million, the Falcons have $51 million, or just 25.5% of the cap, to spend on the 43 other roster spots. That’s just $1.19 million or 0.59% of the cap per player to invest.

The team currently has just 40 players under contract AND they’re already projected to be over by $18.3 million when factoring in draft picks!

After the Top 10 players, the team has 12 players making over $1 million. When factoring in those 12 players, the Top 22 cap hits for the Falcons consume all but $1.95 million of a $200 million cap.

 

So an NFL team has 53 players on a roster, the Falcons are spending $198.05 million on 22 players, plus dead money. This leaves the team with $1.95 million for 31 players, which leaves $62,903 per player.

If the team does a complete fire sale and moves on from Mack, Freeman, Sanu, Allen, Keanu Neal, and Allen Bailey, that saves $32.125 million, which brings that total to $34.075 million in cap space. That’s still just $1.1 million per player, which, especially considering all the talent they’d be ridding themselves of in that scenario, likely makes them one of the worst teams in the NFL next year.

I have no idea what the Falcons are going to do to right the ship right now and I don’t think they do either.

Welcome to salary cap ****. We’ve been waiting for you.

Zack Moore is a certified NFL agent, a writer for OverTheCap.com and OnnitGymMMA.com, as well as the author of “Caponomics: Building Super Bowl Champions,” a book that breaks down how Super Bowl champions are built in the NFL’s salary cap era and discusses how NFL front offices can best allocate resources to create successful teams.

You can follow him on Twitter at @ZackMooreNFL. You can subscribe to The Zack Moore Show podcast here.

 

@FalconFanSince1970

 

 

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15 minutes ago, GeorgiaBoyz said:

You wanted to pay a 30+ year old WR more money with 2 years left on his deal .
 

This is how you get in cap **** . 

I’d still do it, too.  But I honestly think that’s my heart speaking and not my mind.

 

Consider in 2020 we have 4 WR’s under contract whose earning are 25 million

Patriots, including Sanu are at 17 million

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I have said it before, AB has historically over paid the talent on these teams. Name a Falcons player that left our organization, and was a success somewhere else. Simply put, our treasures, what we value and consider good, is another team back up and special teams players!!!

Look it up, Im waiting????

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