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6 Coordinators In 5 Years: Is Continuity That Important?


FalconsIn2012
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Reading @athell thread about the Falcons identity, or lack thereof, got me thinking about Quinn’s tenure.  No coach in the NFL survives having 3 OC’s & 3 DC’s in just 5 years.  Replacing just one coordinator creates wholesale changes and adjustments. We have had 6 Coordinators in 5 years.  I suspect that may be the cause for much of the inconsistencies we have seen since 2015.  World beaters to paper champs on a week-to-week basis.

 

For those who have played at a high level, how disruptive would having 6 Coordinators in 5 years be?

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YES that sh*t makes a difference. Matt’s first year with a new coordinator is usually not great. I’m tired of explaining  this. Defense is no different. That’s why the pats usually come out swinging. They don’t make a lot of coordinators changes. And Brady has been in the same system for his entire career. 

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3 minutes ago, TheFatboi said:

YES that sh*t makes a difference. Matt’s first year with a new coordinator is usually not great. I’m tired of explaining  this. Defense is no different. That’s why the pats usually come out swinging. They don’t make a lot of coordinators changes. And Brady has been in the same system for his entire career. 

Yep. But they want to fire everybody after three weeks...

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2 minutes ago, slickgadawg said:

I agree with that. Thats why getting rid of Sarkisian was a backwards move.  

I kind of see what you are saying. It would have Been interesting to see what kind of year it would have been with Sark here. I wasn’t a huge Sark fan, but at this point in time who knows. I’ve said before with a good defense and Sark the Falcons could have taken it all.

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It's hugely important.  People like to compare pro sports to their own jobs, which I hate, but imagine switching bosses on a yearly basis.  They have different ways of doing things, saying things, planning things, viewing things, speaking things, thinking things and while yeah, you are super smart and can adjust it sure doesn't make your life easier.  Now also imagine all that on top of having to also adjust to new co-workers, whose contributions to their job directly impact your ability to do yours.

Continuity isn't necessarily king but it sure helps.

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Don’t know how many have played but as a player you’re always closer to the assistant coaches than you are to the head man. That’s one of the reasons I love to see guys promoted from in-house.

And then when a new coordinator comes in it’s not just an adjustment for the players but the other assistants working under him to.

@athell’s post is spot on.

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17 hours ago, athell said:

It's hugely important.  People like to compare pro sports to their own jobs, which I hate, but imagine switching bosses on a yearly basis.  They have different ways of doing things, saying things, planning things, viewing things, speaking things, thinking things and while yeah, you are super smart and can adjust it sure doesn't make your life easier.  Now also imagine all that on top of having to also adjust to new co-workers, whose contributions to their job directly impact your ability to do yours.

Continuity isn't necessarily king but it sure helps.

Ironically, I have had 7 bosses in 4 years.  And I can vouch, it is extremely stressful.  You have to figure out what they like, how they communicate, and what they expect, etc.  And all of that keeps you from really being able to focus on your actual job.

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18 hours ago, TheFatboi said:

Bro you can’t keep clanging coordinators. PERIOD!!! Show me one team that made a seamless transition of coordinators. The Steelers defense hasn’t been the same since Lebeau left. 

The closest thing Ryan has had to continuity is playing under KS for 2 years then Sark for 2 years (wco). Even so completely different verbiage and so forth. So many ppl will never acknowledge the challenges that come w changing OC’s more often than some here change their underwear but it is what it is. Most have never seen or even googled an nfl playbook either. They make War and Peace look like Green Eggs and Ham

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Speaking of continuity. It hurts to admit this, but you know what program has benefitted off continuity? The Clemson Tigers. Yep. 9 years of patience and they hardly changed anybody across the DC and OC. I’m pretty sure Vince Dooley and Erik Russell stayed together for 10+ years before winning a national title in 1980. What didn’t help Mark Richt’s chances was too many coordinator changes throughout his career and could never get over the hump. Continuity and patience with that continuity makes a huge difference. All of us fans forget, head coaches and coordinators can learn from their mistakes too and not just the players. Of course I don’t feel that way about Dan Quinn.

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19 minutes ago, MoFalconsFan56 said:

The closest thing Ryan has had to continuity is playing under KS for 2 years then Sark for 2 years (wco). Even so completely different verbiage and so forth. So many ppl will never acknowledge the challenges that come w changing OC’s more often than some here change their underwear but it is what it is. Most have never seen or even googled an nfl playbook either. They make War and Peace look like Green Eggs and Ham

Exactly. To the casual fan it’s “football” and they’ve done it their whole life. While this is true the only thing that they’ve done all that time is the fundamentals of the game. That’s why the higher you ascend the more difficult the game gets because now you’re adding plays, concepts, strategy, philosophy, scheme. Some guys played in a 3-4 their high school and college career. Then get drafted to an nfl team that runs a 4-3 and fans wonder what happened to the player. Well changing coordinators is the same thing. You have to unlearn one way to learn another way. And it takes at LEAST 2 years to get it down. So if we’re changing coordinators every 2 years there will always be that process of unlearning and relearning. 

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18 hours ago, E. T. said:

Definitely key to have continuity at the coordinator spot. But if the one that left to be HC at the niners never left, he'd still be here. Because he was so successful, it started the chain reaction everyone sees right now. We're desperately trying to find that right match again. 

Well said. There is always a lot of coaching movement at the end of every NFL season. And when HC's are fired, their whole regime almost always goes with them. Somebody's OC or DC is going to be leaving to fill the vacant HC jobs, ala we lost Shannie to the 49ers just as we became a SB-caliber team.

The Falcons have had more than their fair share of coordinators, but it's not like almost every team isn't constantly having to learn new systems under new OC's and/or DC's. I'm certain it makes a huge difference, but on the other hand, that's life in the NFL. The quality of who you bring in for a replacement is equally important in my estimation as how often you have to make a change.

While we lost Shanahan to the 49ers, Quinn looked at his situation after last season and pondered: "Am I confident enough in the coordinators and present OC to put my job on the line by keeping them around, or do I have a better shot at remaining if I make radical changes and bring in more experienced replacements?' He obviously felt the need to go radical and clean house, and I probably would have done the same thing in his shoes. And he had good candidates for the replacements, including putting himself in charge of the defense. Just about the most seamless transition you could have on that side of the ball.

I know there are differences in coaching styles, wrinkles in every new defensive and offensive scheme. Players have to step up, learn it and execute it. And they obviously need to get reps in game situations to get it all down vs competition. I'm unaware of any major changes in either the offense or defense, so it's hard for me to understand how this team could struggle so mightily every other week on both sides of the ball. The one positive is if this is not enough time with the O or D schemes, there's 13 games left to figure it out and get it cranked up.

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18 hours ago, athell said:

It's hugely important.  People like to compare pro sports to their own jobs, which I hate, but imagine switching bosses on a yearly basis.  They have different ways of doing things, saying things, planning things, viewing things, speaking things, thinking things and while yeah, you are super smart and can adjust it sure doesn't make your life easier.  Now also imagine all that on top of having to also adjust to new co-workers, whose contributions to their job directly impact your ability to do yours.

Continuity isn't necessarily king but it sure helps.

I agree, but our situation was different because Ryan has already had Koetter for his OC, so whatever remains of Koetter's offensive scheme philosophy from those days, Ryan would be familiar with and should not have a lot of trouble getting that back together. Also, in my understanding, we're still going mostly with Shanahan's scheme, but trying to run the ball more to regain some balance.

Even if Sark had stayed, there were going to be changes in the offensive scheme because we weren't running the ball enough and Quinn had made that one of his major requirements. Sark might possibly have been given the freedom to tweak the offense a little more, which would be new things for Ryan and the offense to learn and get down. Things change even without a new OC or DC.

As far as defense, Quinn just dismisses Manuel and takes over a unit he's already been working with and focusing on because it's been a work in progress since he got here and he's literally the best possible DC to execute the scheme that he hand-picked the players to run. They're playing basically the same simple, soft zone as last year. Hard to see how that could be so daunting they can't avoid making stupid penalties constantly on 3rd downs or making mediocre and rookie QB's look like world-beaters.

Cliff notes: Changes happen constantly in the NFL. The winners are the players who adapt quickly and don't play like dog squeeze during the transition between the new and the old. Our players should be more than capable of doing that and they need to man up and get their shlt together ASAP.

 

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