Ergo Proxy

McGary says he hasn’t been dealing with Afib; clarifies condition

167 posts in this topic

Posted (edited)

 

https://www.espn.com/espn/now?nowId=21-41074343-4

^Video on ESPN’s website of Kaleb. Afib was addressed before. There was some VTach issues that was addressed in the past but Dr didn’t think it was all taken care of...according to what Kaleb said.

Now it surfaces again and they hope the remaining cause of VTach is finally dealt with.

Edited by Ergo Proxy

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I'm not smart enough to know what this means so to google I go. Will post the definition for others who don't know

ventricular tachycardia

Ventricular tachycardia is a heart rhythm disorder (arrhythmia) caused by abnormal electrical signals in the lower chambers of the heart (ventricles).

Your heart rate is regulated by electrical signals sent across heart tissues. A healthy heart normally beats about 60 to 100 times a minute when at rest and is defined by signals that originate in the upper chambers of the heart (atria).

 

In ventricular tachycardia (V-tach or VT), abnormal electrical signals in the ventricles cause the heart to beat faster than normal, usually 100 or more beats a minute, out of sync with the upper chambers.

When that happens, your heart may not be able to pump enough blood to your body and lungs because the chambers are beating so fast or out of sync with each other that they don't have time to fill properly.

Ventricular tachycardia may be brief, lasting for only a few seconds, and perhaps not cause any symptoms. Or it can last for much longer and cause symptoms such as dizziness, lightheadedness, palpitations or even loss of consciousness.

In some cases, ventricular tachycardia can cause your heart to stop (sudden cardiac arrest), which is a life-threatening medical emergency. This condition usually occurs in people with other heart conditions, such as those who have had a previous heart attack or other structural heart disease (cardiomyopathy).

Ventricular fibrillation

A dangerous condition related to ventricular tachycardia is ventricular fibrillation (V-fib). In V-fib, your lower heart chambers contract in a very rapid and uncoordinated manner.

Sometimes this rhythm may occur as a result of ventricular tachycardia degenerating into ventricular fibrillation, or it may originate from single ventricular beats. This abnormal rhythm happens most often in people with established heart disease or a prior heart attack. It may also occur due to electrolyte abnormalities (such as high or low potassium levels) or, rarely, in otherwise normal hearts.

Ventricular fibrillation may also cause sudden cardiac arrest and lead to death if not treated immediately.

Symptoms

Brief episodes of ventricular tachycardia may not cause any symptoms in some people. Others may experience:

  • Dizziness
  • Shortness of breath
  • Lightheadedness
  • Feeling as if your heart is racing (palpitations)
  • Chest pain (angina)
  • Seizures

Sustained or more serious episodes of ventricular tachycardia may cause:

  • Loss of consciousness or fainting
  • Cardiac arrest (sudden death)

When to see a doctor

A number of conditions can cause ventricular tachycardia. It's important to get a prompt, accurate diagnosis and appropriate care. See your doctor if you or your child experiences any V-tach symptoms.

If you faint, have difficulty breathing or have chest pain lasting more than a few minutes, get emergency care, or call 911 or your local emergency number. Seek emergency care for anyone experiencing these symptoms.

Causes

V-tach is caused by a disruption in the normal electrical impulses that control the rate of your ventricles' pumping action.

Many things can cause or contribute to problems with the heart's electrical system. These include:

  • Lack of oxygen to the heart due to tissue damage from heart disease
  • Abnormal electrical pathways in the heart present at birth (congenital heart conditions, including long QT syndrome)
  • Structural heart disease (cardiomyopathy)
  • Medication side effects
  • An inflammatory disease affecting skin or other tissues (sarcoidosis)
  • Abuse of recreational drugs, such as cocaine
  • Imbalance of electrolytes, mineral-related substances necessary for conducting electrical impulses

In some cases, the exact cause of ventricular tachycardia can't be determined (idiopathic ventricular tachycardia).

The heart's electrical system

  • Illustration showing a normal heartbeat

    Normal heartbeat

    Normal heartbeat

    In a normal heart rhythm, a cluster of cells at the sinus node sends out an electrical signal. The signal then travels through the atria to the atrioventricular (AV) node and then passes into the ventricles, causing them to contract and pump out blood.

     

To understand the causes of heart rate or rhythm problems such as ventricular tachycardia, it helps to understand how the heart's internal electrical system works.

Your heart is made up of four chambers — two upper chambers (atria) and two lower chambers (ventricles). The rhythm of your heart is normally controlled by a natural pacemaker called the sinus node, which is located in the right atrium. The sinus node produces electrical impulses that normally start each heartbeat.

From the sinus node, electrical impulses travel across the atria, causing the atria muscles to contract and pump blood into the ventricles.

The electrical impulses then arrive at a cluster of cells called the atrioventricular (AV) node — usually the only pathway for signals to travel from the atria to the ventricles.

The AV node slows down the electrical signal before sending it to the ventricles. This slight delay allows the ventricles to fill with blood. When electrical impulses reach the muscles of the ventricles, they contract, causing them to pump blood either to the lungs or to the rest of the body.

When anything disrupts this complex system, it can cause the heart to beat too fast (tachycardia), too slow (bradycardia) or with an irregular rhythm.

Risk factors

Any condition that puts a strain on the heart or damages heart tissue can increase your risk of ventricular tachycardia. Lifestyle changes or medical treatment may decrease the risk associated with the following factors:

  • Heart disease (for example, prior heart attack, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, inflammatory diseases of the heart or genetic conditions)
  • Use of recreational drugs
  • Severe electrolyte abnormalities
  • Medication side effects

Other risk factors

If you have a family history of ventricular tachycardia or other heart rhythm disorders, you may have an increased risk of ventricular tachycardia.

Complications

Complications of ventricular tachycardia vary in severity depending on such factors as the rate, and duration of a rapid heart rate, the frequency with which it happens, and the existence of other heart conditions. Possible complications include:

  • Inability of the heart to pump enough blood (heart failure)
  • Frequent fainting spells or unconsciousness
  • Sudden death caused by cardiac arrest

Prevention

The most effective way to prevent ventricular tachycardia is to reduce your risk of developing heart disease. If you already have heart disease, monitor it and follow your treatment plan to lower your ventricular tachycardia risk.

In some cases, ventricular tachycardia may occur in the absence of heart disease (idiopathic ventricular tachycardia).

Prevent heart disease

Treat or eliminate risk factors that may lead to heart disease. Take the following steps:

  • Exercise and eat a healthy diet. Live a heart-healthy lifestyle by exercising regularly and eating a healthy, low-fat diet that's rich in fruits, vegetables and whole grains.
  • Maintain a healthy weight. Being overweight increases your risk of developing heart disease.
  • Keep blood pressure and cholesterol levels under control. Make lifestyle changes and take medications as prescribed to correct high blood pressure (hypertension) or high cholesterol.
  • Stop smoking. If you smoke and can't quit on your own, talk to your doctor about strategies or programs to help you break a smoking habit.
  • Drink in moderation. If you choose to drink alcohol, do so in moderation. For healthy adults, that means up to one drink a day for women of all ages and men older than age 65, and up to two drinks a day for men age 65 and younger. For some conditions it's recommended that you completely avoid alcohol.

    Ask your doctor for advice specific to your condition. If you can't control your alcohol consumption, talk to your doctor about a program to quit drinking and manage other behaviors related to alcohol abuse.

  • Don't use recreational drugs. Don't use stimulants, such as cocaine. Talk to your doctor about an appropriate program for you if you need help ending recreational drug use.
  • Use over-the-counter medications with caution. Some cold and cough medications contain stimulants that may trigger a rapid heartbeat. Ask your doctor which medications you need to avoid.
  • Limit caffeine. If you drink caffeinated beverages, do so in moderation (no more than one to two beverages daily).
  • Control stress. Avoid unnecessary stress and learn coping techniques to handle normal stress in a healthy way.
  • Go to scheduled checkups. Have regular physical exams and report any signs or symptoms to your doctor.

Monitor and treat existing heart disease

If you already have heart disease, you can take steps to lower your risk of developing ventricular tachycardia or another arrhythmia:

  • Follow the plan. Be sure you understand your treatment plan, and take all medications as prescribed.
  • Report changes immediately. If your symptoms change or get worse or you develop new symptoms, tell your doctor immediately.

 

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Posted (edited)

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/ventricular-tachycardia/symptoms-causes/syc-20355138

VTach by itself isn’t necessarily life threatening from this information...V-fib is different but he doesn’t appear to have that. If he had V-fib this would be a different story as that does seem more serious.

But he was being clear in the video that he didn’t have A-fib causing the symptoms he had a few weeks ago, just from what he said.

Check out the vid in the mayoclinic link.

Edited by Ergo Proxy
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This does explain the four week return.  I assume we are talking about a radiofrequency catheter ablation procedure for recurrent V-tach.  This only requires (surprise!) four weeks of anti-coagulation therapy.  The ventricles (big chambers) are less likely to form clots than the smaller ones.  They basically burn the area where they have triangulated the aberrant electrical signal to be originating from.

This is a little concerning to me, as ventricular tachycardia is is more serious than atrial tachycardia.  Strokes being the consequence of atrial versus inadequate systemic perfusion and cardiac arrest with ventricular.  This is surprising, unless he has some kind of structural heart disease.  I would suspect he has recurrent non-sustained (only a few beats) ventricular tachycardia that gives him symptoms (palpitations, chest discomfort, shortness of breath).  They likely tried an anti-arrhythmic medication or two which failed.  Again, we have scant details on his actual condition based on what he's said publicly, so take it all with a grain of salt.  Regardless, glad to see he is back and I hope the procedure worked well and he can get back to crushing D-linemen.

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Posted (edited)

@chopshop That’s true we don’t know the real details. It doesn’t seem like he has any sort of heart disease, though.

Hopefully, he is on the minimal risks side with this being a matter of fixing electrical impulse issues only and that its different than the issue he had before....Maybe this will have him balanced out with no other episodes of fast heart rate.

Edited by Ergo Proxy
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His playing career may be okay, he may have issues after his career is over though. I was trying to find a list of NFL players who have had a heart condition and found this from a few months ago. I remember a couple of players but don't know the history. This article isn't about what Kaleb has but interesting

https://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/news/20190306/nfl-players-enlarged-hearts-may-harm-health-for-decades#2

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27 minutes ago, Yo_Lover said:

But I heard he wasn't ever gonna play again. TATF was wrong?

No way TATF could ever be wrong. I'm sure he's just putting up a brave front for reporters as they remove his stuff from his locker and take down his name plate. I'm really going to miss him.  :ninja:

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31 minutes ago, Yo_Lover said:

But I heard he wasn't ever gonna play again. TATF was wrong?

Ventricular tachycardia is actually life threatening so that’s not good

 

“Ventricular tachycardia may be brief, lasting for only a few seconds, and perhaps not cause any symptoms. Or it can last for much longer and cause symptoms such as dizziness, lightheadedness, palpitations or even loss of consciousness.

In some cases, ventricular tachycardia can cause your heart to stop (sudden cardiac arrest), which is a life-threatening medical emergency. This condition usually occurs in people with other heart conditions, such as those who have had a previous heart attack or other structural heart disease (cardiomyopathy).

Ventricular fibrillation

A dangerous condition related to ventricular tachycardia is ventricular fibrillation (V-fib). In V-fib, your lower heart chambers contract in a very rapid and uncoordinated manner.

Sometimes this rhythm may occur as a result of ventricular tachycardia degenerating into ventricular fibrillation, or it may originate from single ventricular beats. This abnormal rhythm happens most often in people with established heart disease or a prior heart attack. It may also occur due to electrolyte abnormalities (such as high or low potassium levels) or, rarely, in otherwise normal hearts.

Ventricular fibrillation may also cause sudden cardiac arrest and lead to death if not treated immediately.”

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5 minutes ago, Ergo Proxy said:

@chopshop That’s true we don’t know the real details. It doesn’t seem like he has any sort of heart disease, though.

Definitely, there are cases of non-sustained V-tach (episodes less than 30 seconds) where patients have no structural disease (congenital anomalies, coronary artery disease, or cardiomyopathy being the most common) and still have the tachycardia!  It is less common, but I agree, based on what little we know, it is likely he has idiopathic NSVT or else a genetic abnormality involving the electrical pathways.  Most of these have a lower risk of becoming sustained or leading to sudden cardiac death.  I doubt if he had a structural problem he would have made it to the NFL level or have been cleared.  Not trying to scare people, just trying to be helpful where I can with what I happen to do for a living :lol:

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6 minutes ago, FalconsIn2020 said:

Ventricular tachycardia is actually life threatening so that’s not good

 

“Ventricular tachycardia may be brief, lasting for only a few seconds, and perhaps not cause any symptoms. Or it can last for much longer and cause symptoms such as dizziness, lightheadedness, palpitations or even loss of consciousness.

In some cases, ventricular tachycardia can cause your heart to stop (sudden cardiac arrest), which is a life-threatening medical emergency. This condition usually occurs in people with other heart conditions, such as those who have had a previous heart attack or other structural heart disease (cardiomyopathy).

Ventricular fibrillation

A dangerous condition related to ventricular tachycardia is ventricular fibrillation (V-fib). In V-fib, your lower heart chambers contract in a very rapid and uncoordinated manner.

Sometimes this rhythm may occur as a result of ventricular tachycardia degenerating into ventricular fibrillation, or it may originate from single ventricular beats. This abnormal rhythm happens most often in people with established heart disease or a prior heart attack. It may also occur due to electrolyte abnormalities (such as high or low potassium levels) or, rarely, in otherwise normal hearts.

Ventricular fibrillation may also cause sudden cardiac arrest and lead to death if not treated immediately.”

Not Kaleb.

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Posted (edited)

5 minutes ago, chopshop said:

Definitely, there are cases of non-sustained V-tach (episodes less than 30 seconds) where patients have no structural disease (congenital anomalies, coronary artery disease, or cardiomyopathy being the most common) and still have the tachycardia!  It is less common, but I agree, based on what little we know, it is likely he has idiopathic NSVT or else a genetic abnormality involving the electrical pathways.  Most of these have a lower risk of becoming sustained or leading to sudden cardiac death.  I doubt if he had a structural problem he would have made it to the NFL level or have been cleared.  Not trying to scare people, just trying to be helpful where I can with what I happen to do for a living :lol:

Exactly!

The situation speaks for itself.

This isn’t a player with an unknown enlarged or diseased heart suddenly dying and everyone finding out about something undiagnosed after the fact.

He has been evaluated and treated for quality of life seemingly. Cleared and ready to play.

If he had a heart disease and this was a bandaid, there would be lawsuits over malpractice if they knew of other complications for his situation and still cleared him.

Edited by Ergo Proxy
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Posted (edited)

On 8/26/2019 at 0:44 PM, MAD597 said:

Dumb move to trade up in the first rd for a guy with a known heart condition.

I for one and surprised that you of all people are being negative

Edited by LouDog

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I'd still take Kaleb if we had a do over. Its just been bad timing with camp and the RT battle. The big fella will be fine. 

We worry professionally.  And we aren't f*****g doctors.

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Posted (edited)

46 minutes ago, ya_boi_j said:

I'm not smart enough to know what this means so to google I go. Will post the definition for others who don't know

ventricular tachycardia

Ventricular tachycardia is a heart rhythm disorder (arrhythmia) caused by abnormal electrical signals in the lower chambers of the heart (ventricles).

Your heart rate is regulated by electrical signals sent across heart tissues. A healthy heart normally beats about 60 to 100 times a minute when at rest and is defined by signals that originate in the upper chambers of the heart (atria).

 

In ventricular tachycardia (V-tach or VT), abnormal electrical signals in the ventricles cause the heart to beat faster than normal, usually 100 or more beats a minute, out of sync with the upper chambers.

When that happens, your heart may not be able to pump enough blood to your body and lungs because the chambers are beating so fast or out of sync with each other that they don't have time to fill properly.

Ventricular tachycardia may be brief, lasting for only a few seconds, and perhaps not cause any symptoms. Or it can last for much longer and cause symptoms such as dizziness, lightheadedness, palpitations or even loss of consciousness.

In some cases, ventricular tachycardia can cause your heart to stop (sudden cardiac arrest), which is a life-threatening medical emergency. This condition usually occurs in people with other heart conditions, such as those who have had a previous heart attack or other structural heart disease (cardiomyopathy).

Ventricular fibrillation

A dangerous condition related to ventricular tachycardia is ventricular fibrillation (V-fib). In V-fib, your lower heart chambers contract in a very rapid and uncoordinated manner.

Sometimes this rhythm may occur as a result of ventricular tachycardia degenerating into ventricular fibrillation, or it may originate from single ventricular beats. This abnormal rhythm happens most often in people with established heart disease or a prior heart attack. It may also occur due to electrolyte abnormalities (such as high or low potassium levels) or, rarely, in otherwise normal hearts.

Ventricular fibrillation may also cause sudden cardiac arrest and lead to death if not treated immediately.

Symptoms

Brief episodes of ventricular tachycardia may not cause any symptoms in some people. Others may experience:

  • Dizziness
  • Shortness of breath
  • Lightheadedness
  • Feeling as if your heart is racing (palpitations)
  • Chest pain (angina)
  • Seizures

Sustained or more serious episodes of ventricular tachycardia may cause:

  • Loss of consciousness or fainting
  • Cardiac arrest (sudden death)

When to see a doctor

A number of conditions can cause ventricular tachycardia. It's important to get a prompt, accurate diagnosis and appropriate care. See your doctor if you or your child experiences any V-tach symptoms.

If you faint, have difficulty breathing or have chest pain lasting more than a few minutes, get emergency care, or call 911 or your local emergency number. Seek emergency care for anyone experiencing these symptoms.

Causes

V-tach is caused by a disruption in the normal electrical impulses that control the rate of your ventricles' pumping action.

Many things can cause or contribute to problems with the heart's electrical system. These include:

  • Lack of oxygen to the heart due to tissue damage from heart disease
  • Abnormal electrical pathways in the heart present at birth (congenital heart conditions, including long QT syndrome)
  • Structural heart disease (cardiomyopathy)
  • Medication side effects
  • An inflammatory disease affecting skin or other tissues (sarcoidosis)
  • Abuse of recreational drugs, such as cocaine
  • Imbalance of electrolytes, mineral-related substances necessary for conducting electrical impulses

In some cases, the exact cause of ventricular tachycardia can't be determined (idiopathic ventricular tachycardia).

The heart's electrical system

  • Illustration showing a normal heartbeat

    Normal heartbeat

    Normal heartbeat

    In a normal heart rhythm, a cluster of cells at the sinus node sends out an electrical signal. The signal then travels through the atria to the atrioventricular (AV) node and then passes into the ventricles, causing them to contract and pump out blood.

     

To understand the causes of heart rate or rhythm problems such as ventricular tachycardia, it helps to understand how the heart's internal electrical system works.

Your heart is made up of four chambers — two upper chambers (atria) and two lower chambers (ventricles). The rhythm of your heart is normally controlled by a natural pacemaker called the sinus node, which is located in the right atrium. The sinus node produces electrical impulses that normally start each heartbeat.

From the sinus node, electrical impulses travel across the atria, causing the atria muscles to contract and pump blood into the ventricles.

The electrical impulses then arrive at a cluster of cells called the atrioventricular (AV) node — usually the only pathway for signals to travel from the atria to the ventricles.

The AV node slows down the electrical signal before sending it to the ventricles. This slight delay allows the ventricles to fill with blood. When electrical impulses reach the muscles of the ventricles, they contract, causing them to pump blood either to the lungs or to the rest of the body.

When anything disrupts this complex system, it can cause the heart to beat too fast (tachycardia), too slow (bradycardia) or with an irregular rhythm.

Risk factors

Any condition that puts a strain on the heart or damages heart tissue can increase your risk of ventricular tachycardia. Lifestyle changes or medical treatment may decrease the risk associated with the following factors:

  • Heart disease (for example, prior heart attack, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, inflammatory diseases of the heart or genetic conditions)
  • Use of recreational drugs
  • Severe electrolyte abnormalities
  • Medication side effects

Other risk factors

If you have a family history of ventricular tachycardia or other heart rhythm disorders, you may have an increased risk of ventricular tachycardia.

Complications

Complications of ventricular tachycardia vary in severity depending on such factors as the rate, and duration of a rapid heart rate, the frequency with which it happens, and the existence of other heart conditions. Possible complications include:

  • Inability of the heart to pump enough blood (heart failure)
  • Frequent fainting spells or unconsciousness
  • Sudden death caused by cardiac arrest

Prevention

The most effective way to prevent ventricular tachycardia is to reduce your risk of developing heart disease. If you already have heart disease, monitor it and follow your treatment plan to lower your ventricular tachycardia risk.

In some cases, ventricular tachycardia may occur in the absence of heart disease (idiopathic ventricular tachycardia).

Prevent heart disease

Treat or eliminate risk factors that may lead to heart disease. Take the following steps:

  • Exercise and eat a healthy diet. Live a heart-healthy lifestyle by exercising regularly and eating a healthy, low-fat diet that's rich in fruits, vegetables and whole grains.
  • Maintain a healthy weight. Being overweight increases your risk of developing heart disease.
  • Keep blood pressure and cholesterol levels under control. Make lifestyle changes and take medications as prescribed to correct high blood pressure (hypertension) or high cholesterol.
  • Stop smoking. If you smoke and can't quit on your own, talk to your doctor about strategies or programs to help you break a smoking habit.
  • Drink in moderation. If you choose to drink alcohol, do so in moderation. For healthy adults, that means up to one drink a day for women of all ages and men older than age 65, and up to two drinks a day for men age 65 and younger. For some conditions it's recommended that you completely avoid alcohol.

    Ask your doctor for advice specific to your condition. If you can't control your alcohol consumption, talk to your doctor about a program to quit drinking and manage other behaviors related to alcohol abuse.

  • Don't use recreational drugs. Don't use stimulants, such as cocaine. Talk to your doctor about an appropriate program for you if you need help ending recreational drug use.
  • Use over-the-counter medications with caution. Some cold and cough medications contain stimulants that may trigger a rapid heartbeat. Ask your doctor which medications you need to avoid.
  • Limit caffeine. If you drink caffeinated beverages, do so in moderation (no more than one to two beverages daily).
  • Control stress. Avoid unnecessary stress and learn coping techniques to handle normal stress in a healthy way.
  • Go to scheduled checkups. Have regular physical exams and report any signs or symptoms to your doctor.

Monitor and treat existing heart disease

If you already have heart disease, you can take steps to lower your risk of developing ventricular tachycardia or another arrhythmia:

  • Follow the plan. Be sure you understand your treatment plan, and take all medications as prescribed.
  • Report changes immediately. If your symptoms change or get worse or you develop new symptoms, tell your doctor immediately.

 

I still think he is incorrectly announcing his diagnosis. Historically, it would be psvt (paroxysmal supraventricular tacchycardia) that would cause his sx and be treatable by ablation. Recurrent vtach would be treated with defibrillator/pacemaker implant. Side-note: with vfib, your heart pumps no blood, you are pulse less, dead. I apologize for quoting the whole thing. Try not to let it happen again.

Edited by Williamb
Addition

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I've had that my whole life,, it's not really life threatening ,,, I've leaned a long time ago how to get mine back to normal beats..  For anybody who may have this,, When your heart starts beating extra fast ,, and what seems to be double timing... Stand up straight,  Take a huge breath of air in,, then hold it for about  5 to 6 seconds,, then slowly let the air out as you  slowly bend over to put you hands on your knees. And nearly every time the heart will go back to a normal beat. But to be honest with you.. I wouldnt want anyone messing with my heart for this .. I'm 62 now and in very good condition for my age. Because I'm very active with my hobby and with work also.. But this is way more common than most people know . It's called a racing heart... Ive had it since I was in the 6th grade,, I'll Never forget the first time it happened on the softball field. I actually thought I was going to die.. But I thought , well, I'm ready to die if God chooses.. But then I taught myself  how to get it to go back to normal beats...  more people have this than you'd think,,  It's been said that MSG can cause this,,  My sister has had it also. But she's in good health at the age of 64. 

one more thing, when it jumps into the double timeing ,, it instantly happens,, it's not like your heart slowly going up as you work out like normal. It jumps from normal to like double timeing,, so there is no wondering if you have it or not... just for you information. 

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Just now, FalconsIn2020 said:

He also has A-Fib

Supposedly had it taken care of before.

He doesn’t have V-fib; which can kill you, and he doesn’t have the risk factors mentioned for VTach to be an issue.

Oh, which is hopefully cured now, by the way.

Kaleb spelled it out in the McClure video that after his AFib was fixed they tried addressing VTach; but Dr at the time didn’t believe it was all taken care of. It surfaced again and he had another ablation to fix the remaining culprit to VTach.

Again, no heart disease or condition causing it to be life threatening.

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4 minutes ago, Ergo Proxy said:

Supposedly had it taken care of before.

He doesn’t have V-fib; which can kill you, and he doesn’t have the risk factors mentioned for VTach to be an issue.

Oh, which is hopefully cured now, by the way.

Kaleb spelled it out in the McClure video that after his AFib was fixed they tried addressing VTach; but Dr at the time didn’t believe it was all taken care of. It surfaced again and he had another ablation to fix the remaining culprit to VTach.

Again, no heart disease or condition causing it to be life threatening.

My understanding is this is s separate issue.  Kaleb has A-fib...but this is VTach which involves his lower chambers.  

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The fact that he had no hx of heart disease and fact that he does what he does might have inclined them to treat vtach with ablation over the aicd route. I myself have an implanted defibrilator.

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