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Kaleb McGary to have heart procedure per team


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1 minute ago, FalconsIn2020 said:

Why are multiple ablation required?  For an athlete, that must be rare.  Are they simply not identifying the root cause

 

1 minute ago, falconidae said:

So, seems like that they can perform this procedure and he might not need another one for the rest of his career. Is that correct?

The whole problem here is the success rate of the procedure. That’s the real issue. It’s variable and we just don’t know until we know.  He could go the whole season and be fine, but still have a problem that doesn’t show up until next year, randomly, because it doesn’t strike until it feels like it. That’s the reason it’s called paroxysmal. Most people just live with it, but a professional athlete needs the problem fixed, because you can’t play football with random dizzy spells   

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1 hour ago, FalconsIn2020 said:

Glad you are back, Mrs. Tandy.  Internet hug coming at ya

Thank you.  I've been looking in occasionally, I just don't have much heart to post right now.   But thank you for the hug.  It's a struggle every day, but I will keep striving to reach a new normal in my life.

Football is coming up - and I can't remember the last time I went through a season without him.   It's going to be hard.

  

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Just now, Tandy said:

Thank you.  I've been looking in occasionally, I just don't have much heart to post right now.   But thank you for the hug.  It's a struggle every day, but I will keep striving to reach a new normal in my life.

  

Good to see you posting again, sis.  Prayers up for you and yours every day.

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1 minute ago, Tandy said:

Thank you.  I've been looking in occasionally, I just don't have much heart to post right now.   But thank you for the hug.  It's a struggle every day, but I will keep striving to reach a new normal in my life.

  

The Queen of AFMB is well loved on TATF.  So whenever you find yourself struggling, let us try and put a smile on your face

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2 minutes ago, Tandy said:

Thank you.  I've been looking in occasionally, I just don't have much heart to post right now.   But thank you for the hug.  It's a struggle every day, but I will keep striving to reach a new normal in my life.

Football is coming up - and I can't remember the last time I went through a season without him.   It's going to be hard.

  

Really is exciting to have you back. You can reach out for anything. 

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4 minutes ago, droopy1592 said:

 

The whole problem here is the success rate of the procedure. That’s the real issue. It’s variable and we just don’t know until we know.  He could go the whole season and be fine, but still have a problem that doesn’t show up until next year, randomly, because it doesn’t strike until it feels like it. That’s the reason it’s called paroxysmal. Most people just live with it, but a professional athlete needs the problem fixed, because you can’t play football with random dizzy spells   

Thanks for the info, brotha

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42 minutes ago, falconidae said:

This is his 3rd, not his fourth. According to the falcons.com article, he had this done twice in his college career.

Look, if McGary needs to take this year off to deal with this, I'm really OK with that.

But, it is a fairly routine procedure, and no one here is  board certified in the specialty and has access to all the medical records to make a judgement.

If the team doctors clear him to play, put him back out there in a few weeks.

Schefter said 6-8 weeks.  Do you think Schefty made that number up himself?

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10 minutes ago, caponine said:

I'm talking about heart arrhythmia mainly 

You really should stfu, you have no idea what you’re talking about. Afib is an Arrhythmia and not all arrhythmias lead to heart attacks. Jesus! Bradycardia is an “arrhythmia” that most athletes have. My resting heart rate at night is 48. That’s going to cause a heart attack? Get the **** outta here. First result in google even says afib won’t cause heart attack’s however heart attacks can cause afib. You’re an idiot. 

11 minutes ago, Yo_Lover said:

The article 20 posted said his issue isn't life threatening. Are they taking into account he could have strokes like you said, are they ignoring them all together, or does this change what you think he has?

 It’s not life-threatening, but just imagine you’re blocking Von Miller then suddenly you feel lightheaded,dizzy, and nauseated. That’s what’s happening. Most people live with it. It’s just that some have it bad enough or need the problem fixed for their lifestyle needs. 

4 minutes ago, caponine said:

If you know like you say you do then u should know heart arrhythmias can lead to heart attacks. There are less serious arrthymias and more severe ones. 

Shut up and read above 

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45 minutes ago, falconidae said:

This is his 3rd, not his fourth. According to the falcons.com article, he had this done twice in his college career.

Look, if McGary needs to take this year off to deal with this, I'm really OK with that.

But, it is a fairly routine procedure, and no one here is  board certified in the specialty and has access to all the medical records to make a judgement.

If the team doctors clear him to play, put him back out there in a few weeks.

This will be his 4th

 

”Ever since, even as he’s endured three heart procedures while trying to fulfill the can’t-miss football potential many placed on his massive shoulders, Kaleb has been making plans to make things right again for his family.

“That’s certainly part of this football thing,” he says. “As much as I do it for myself and my guys, there’s this dream in the back of my head, if I get a decent contract in the end and I can finally fix everything that went wrong — I can put my family back where they should be.”…

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3 minutes ago, droopy1592 said:

You really should stfu, you have no idea what you’re talking about. Afib is an Arrhythmia and not all arrhythmias lead to heart attacks. Jesus! Bradycardia is an “arrhythmia” that most athletes have. My resting heart rate at night is 48. That’s going to cause a heart attack? Get the **** outta here. First result in google even says afib won’t cause heart attack’s however heart attacks can cause afib. You’re an idiot. 

 It’s not life-threatening, but just imagine you’re blocking Von Miller then suddenly you feel lightheaded,dizzy, and nauseated. That’s what’s happening. Most people live with it. It’s just that some have it bad enough or need the problem fixed for their lifestyle needs. 

Shut up and read above 

It isn’t considered life threatening.  It’s classified as performance limiting.

But one would think you could die once your heart rate is 300-400. No?

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Just now, FalconsIn2020 said:

This will be his 4th

 

”Ever since, even as he’s endured three heart procedures while trying to fulfill the can’t-miss football potential many placed on his massive shoulders, Kaleb has been making plans to make things right again for his family.

“That’s certainly part of this football thing,” he says. “As much as I do it for myself and my guys, there’s this dream in the back of my head, if I get a decent contract in the end and I can finally fix everything that went wrong — I can put my family back where they should be.”…

Then the article I quoted was wrong:

"The minimally-invasive procedure is similar to two previous procedures McGary has undergone in his playing career"

Oh well. 

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8 minutes ago, droopy1592 said:

You really should stfu, you have no idea what you’re talking about. Afib is an Arrhythmia and not all arrhythmias lead to heart attacks. Jesus! Bradycardia is an “arrhythmia” that most athletes have. My resting heart rate at night is 48. That’s going to cause a heart attack? Get the **** outta here. First result in google even says afib won’t cause heart attack’s however heart attacks can cause afib. You’re an idiot. 

 It’s not life-threatening, but just imagine you’re blocking Von Miller then suddenly you feel lightheaded,dizzy, and nauseated. That’s what’s happening. Most people live with it. It’s just that some have it bad enough or need the problem fixed for their lifestyle needs. 

Shut up and read above 

Lmaoo right idk what I'm talking about but I had an arrhythmia smh, my doctors told me this DA. Your heart beats to slow or too fast and it's a concern you *** hat smh. A very slow heart rate or fast heart rate at rest is a problem. Wow you should know this stuff 

Edited by caponine
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https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minimaze_procedure

This a sort of a brief explanation 

 

here js something to notice 

 

The mechanism by which AF is eliminated by curative procedures such as the maze, minimaze, or catheter ablation is controversial. All successful methods destroy tissue in the areas of the left atrium near the junction of the pulmonary veins, hence these regions are thought to be important. A concept gaining support is that paroxysmal AF is mediated in part by the autonomic nervous system [8] and that the intrinsic cardiac nervous system, which is located in these regions, plays an important role.[10] Supporting this is the finding that targeting these autonomic sites improves the likelihood of successful elimination of AF by catheter ablation.”

So this could be an extra step they take  

And 

 

Long-term success of the minimaze procedures awaits a consensus. Attaining a consensus is hindered by several problems; perhaps the most important of these is incomplete or inconsistent post-procedure follow-up to determine if atrial fibrillation has recurred, although many reasons have been considered.[14] It has been clearly demonstrated that longer or more intensive follow-up identifies much more recurrent atrial fibrillation,[15] hence a procedure with more careful follow-up will appear to be less successful. In addition, procedures continue to evolve rapidly, so long follow-up data do not accurately reflect current procedural methods. For more recent minimaze procedures, only relatively small and preliminary reports are available. With those caveats in mind, it can be said that reported short-term freedom from atrial fibrillation following the radiofrequency ("Wolf") procedure ranges from 67% to 91% [6][7][9] with longer-term results in a similar range, but limited primarily to patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation.[16][17

 

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14 minutes ago, droopy1592 said:

 

The whole problem here is the success rate of the procedure. That’s the real issue. It’s variable and we just don’t know until we know.  He could go the whole season and be fine, but still have a problem that doesn’t show up until next year, randomly, because it doesn’t strike until it feels like it. That’s the reason it’s called paroxysmal. Most people just live with it, but a professional athlete needs the problem fixed, because you can’t play football with random dizzy spells   

Appreciate the info. I know you don't have McGary's medical history. Judging off what you do know, would you have drafted him?

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1 minute ago, droopy1592 said:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minimaze_procedure

This a sort of a brief explanation 

 

here js something to notice 

 

The mechanism by which AF is eliminated by curative procedures such as the maze, minimaze, or catheter ablation is controversial. All successful methods destroy tissue in the areas of the left atrium near the junction of the pulmonary veins, hence these regions are thought to be important. A concept gaining support is that paroxysmal AF is mediated in part by the autonomic nervous system [8] and that the intrinsic cardiac nervous system, which is located in these regions, plays an important role.[10] Supporting this is the finding that targeting these autonomic sites improves the likelihood of successful elimination of AF by catheter ablation.”

So this could be an extra step they take  

And 

 

Long-term success of the minimaze procedures awaits a consensus. Attaining a consensus is hindered by several problems; perhaps the most important of these is incomplete or inconsistent post-procedure follow-up to determine if atrial fibrillation has recurred, although many reasons have been considered.[14] It has been clearly demonstrated that longer or more intensive follow-up identifies much more recurrent atrial fibrillation,[15] hence a procedure with more careful follow-up will appear to be less successful. In addition, procedures continue to evolve rapidly, so long follow-up data do not accurately reflect current procedural methods. For more recent minimaze procedures, only relatively small and preliminary reports are available. With those caveats in mind, it can be said that reported short-term freedom from atrial fibrillation following the radiofrequency ("Wolf") procedure ranges from 67% to 91% [6][7][9] with longer-term results in a similar range, but limited primarily to patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation.[16][17

 

Thanks, got a definition for short term and long term?

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4 minutes ago, FalconsIn2020 said:

It isn’t considered life threatening.  It’s classified as performance limiting.

But one would think you could die once your heart rate is 300-400. No?

If you leave it there, sure, but I can count on two fingers over 11 years how many times I’ve seen RVR go over 200 and only heard of a random case of 300. It generally doesn’t happen with paroxysmal afib... not that high. 

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7 minutes ago, FalconsIn2020 said:

It isn’t considered life threatening.  It’s classified as performance limiting.

But one would think you could die once your heart rate is 300-400. No?

Depends on the person and how long the heart is at that pace, but considering 60-100 is normal...300 is very dangerous.

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6 minutes ago, falconidae said:

Appreciate the info. I know you don't have McGary's medical history. Judging off what you do know, would you have drafted him?

With the knowledge that we are on perhaps the fourth procedure, no. It’s not likely to be repaired unless they take the extra steps to look into autonomic causes. It’s sad but true. I like the guy, but I wouldn’t have drafted him. 

Edited by droopy1592
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