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Kaleb McGary to have heart procedure per team


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2 questions- Hopefully this is short term but once he does come. back is it safe for him to jump back into a brutal sport like NFL football?

With the depth at Guard, both Carpenter and Brown being massive can one of them cross train at OT?

Injuries in the NFL you can never assume nothing!

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Kaleb has the same thing I have which is Wolff–Parkinson–White syndrome. I had the procedure twice within a 15 day period. The Doc can’t fix the issue cause it to close to my Atrioventricular nod

He's young and a rookie. Don't rush him back. This is a heart, not a hammy. 

Thank you.  I've been looking in occasionally, I just don't have much heart to post right now.   But thank you for the hug.  It's a struggle every day, but I will keep striving to reach a new normal i

3 minutes ago, atljbo said:

What's crazy is it looked like he had a shot to beat out Ty how much he has been praised lately...  

 

I think he could have won the job with a good preseason.

 

But you let the man heal up.... give him 8 weeks... it's no rush

This is partly why I think they are fine with him getting it done now. I wonder if they wanted to see how he looked through some of TC before doing the procedure, in case he has to step in for Ty mid season. If they did it post draft and he missed everything else to date, he would have been behind on everything all season. 

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13 minutes ago, Cole World said:

 

Kaleb has the same thing I have which is Wolff–Parkinson–White syndrome.

I had the procedure twice within a 15 day period. The Doc can’t fix the issue cause it to close to my Atrioventricular node and if he hit that of course I’m gone. 

Kaleb will be fine I run and lift 6 days a week and after the 2nd procedure I was back at it after the week, although I felt good after 3 days.

Glad you're alright and thanks for the insight. Makes me feel less nervous about Kaleb.

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2 minutes ago, athell said:

Repeat ablations means his heart rhythm can't stay in balance.  Wonder if he is suffering from a-fib.  Hoping for the best for the kid, but you don't want to hear any news about the heart.  Get better Kaleb.

We need his sparkling personality back in the clubhouse ASAP!

(For the record, I love his personality.)

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5 minutes ago, athell said:

Repeat ablations means his heart rhythm can't stay in balance.  Wonder if he is suffering from a-fib.  Hoping for the best for the kid, but you don't want to hear any news about the heart.  Get better Kaleb.

My Father just had this procedure a few months ago.  He is 84, but in good shape.  Said he felt really weird he day of but the day after felt fine and couldn't tell he had anything done.  His doctor told him to take it easy for a week or two.  My dad had afib with tachycardia and they didn't want to do the ablation until he went tachy.  Worked great for about two months, but his heart rate just went back above 100.  Not were it was, but still enough the doctors said they might have to do the ablation again.

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24 minutes ago, Cole World said:

 

Kaleb has the same thing I have which is Wolff–Parkinson–White syndrome.

I had the procedure twice within a 15 day period. The Doc can’t fix the issue cause it to close to my Atrioventricular node and if he hit that of course I’m gone. 

Kaleb will be fine I run and lift 6 days a week and after the 2nd procedure I was back at it after the week, although I felt good after 3 days.

Just saw this, thanks for the info Cole.  Was this the confirmed diagnosis in Kaleb?  I have known firemen who have had to retire due to WPW.  Hoping for the best.

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3 minutes ago, Herr Beast said:

I am not joking. We drafted someone with known heart issue, that has occurred several times in the past. What could go wrong? 

This is from his draft profile:

  • Has been medically cleared to play with heart arrhythmia issue but will need to pass NFL medicals.
He's played with it in college. He was cleared to play with it in the pros. You literally have no info other than he's getting this procedure done. We don't know the severity or if it's even life threatening or a preventive procedure. 
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2 minutes ago, schwarzenegger321 said:

My Father just had this procedure a few months ago.  He is 84, but in good shape.  Said he felt really weird he day of but the day after felt fine and couldn't tell he had anything done.  His doctor told him to take it easy for a week or two.  My dad had afib with tachycardia and they didn't want to do the ablation until he went tachy.  Worked great for about two months, but his heart rate just went back above 100.  Not were it was, but still enough the doctors said they might have to do the ablation again.

Prayers up for your pops!

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Just now, athell said:

Prayers up for your pops!

Thanks man.  I was actually trying to emphasize that this is something that is pretty straight forward and people can have multiple ablations.  Sometimes they work for a long time, sometimes they don't.

But I do appreciate your comment.  Life is to short and precious to ever put football above it. 

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16 minutes ago, athell said:

Repeat ablations means his heart rhythm can't stay in balance.  Wonder if he is suffering from a-fib.  Hoping for the best for the kid, but you don't want to hear any news about the heart.  Get better Kaleb.

It is a-fib.  When he was first hospitalized in high school as a junior, his heart was beating 300 times per minute.

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1 minute ago, schwarzenegger321 said:

Thanks man.  I was actually trying to emphasize that this is something that is pretty straight forward and people can have multiple ablations.  Sometimes they work for a long time, sometimes they don't.

But I do appreciate your comment.  Life is to short and precious to ever put football above it. 

Thank You !! Its never that serious enough to put a man's life in jeopardy just to entertain us and I wish you the best 

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2 minutes ago, schwarzenegger321 said:

Thanks man.  I was actually trying to emphasize that this is something that is pretty straight forward and people can have multiple ablations.  Sometimes they work for a long time, sometimes they don't.

But I do appreciate your comment.  Life is to short and precious to ever put football above it. 

Oh yeah, I got where you were going.  I was in the medical field so I know just how things can be night and day different from patient to patient so while I am hoping Kaleb's return will be like your father's, I guess I'll just wait and see how he takes to it.  Hopefully this will be the last procedure for him and your pops!

Life IS too short man, truth.

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6 minutes ago, athell said:

300!?!?!

How is this man alive?

Dude has heart problems.  This will be his 4th surgery:

 

UW lineman Kaleb McGary: ‘I’m finally starting to see speckles of light, man’ 

   
 
Originally published August 12, 2016 at 12:00 pm Updated August 16, 2016 at 12:49 pm 
University of Washington offensive lineman Kaleb McGary, second from left, puts his arms around his girlfriend, Brianna Shannon, while hanging out with friends Morgan Henderson, left, Jacob Walker, second from right, and his sister, Savannah McGary in Fife. (Johnny Andrews/The Seattle Times)University of Washington offensive lineman Kaleb McGary, second from left,... (Johnny Andrews/The Seattle Times) More 
 

UW offensive lineman Kaleb McGary has had to overcome plenty in his life. He’s endured three heart procedures while trying to fulfill a can’t-miss football potential, a potential he hopes will rectify his family’s struggles.

Adam Jude 
By 
Seattle Times staff reporter

His heart was beating 300 times a minute, his head spinning, his legs giving out from under him. Then, of all things, it was his nose that bore the brunt of the initial shock.

UW football player Kaleb McGary can chuckle a bit now about the time his heart arrhythmia caused him to lose consciousness while playing in a basketball game at Fife High School. During a fourth-quarter timeout of a taut game against rival White River in January 2013, he collapsed face-first into the bottom row of wooden bleachers. He came to moments later with blood running down his face.

What remains from that initial scare is a scar spanning the bridge of Kaleb’s nose.

 
 
 
 

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“My nose is more sturdy than it looks, surprisingly,” he said during a recent interview. “I’d like to believe I left a little dent in the bench — gave some back for what I got.”

Before becoming one of the state’s most sought-after high school football recruits, and before resuming his bid for a starting job on Washington’s offensive line this month, Kaleb and his family first had to figure out what was wrong with his heart.

After collapsing in the Fife gym, he was rushed to the emergency room at Tacoma’s St. Joseph Medical Center; en route, paramedics discovered Kaleb’s quivering heart was beating 300 times a minute. That night, a doctor suggested to Kaleb’s father, Justin, immediate surgery to replace a valve in the teenager’s heart.

Justin quickly nixed that idea, just as Kaleb’s mother, Cassandra, refused to accept the assertion from one of the first cardiologists they visited that her son would never be able to play football again. She wanted more tests, more answers; it took more than three years, but Kaleb has, finally, found some stability with his heartbeat.

 

The family’s resolve, after all, had already been tested. About a year and a half before Kaleb’s collapse, Justin was found to have multiple sclerosis, an ongoing battle he refuses to let slow him down. A year after that diagnosis, the McGarys lost their home and their family farm.

Heartache upon heartache.

 

Diagnosing the heart

The doctors at UW’s Center for Sports Cardiology had to order special electrode catheters — extra long — for Kaleb’s most recent heart procedure, performed in January. They’d never done a cardiac ablation procedure on someone so large.

 

It’s considered a minimally invasive procedure. The catheters used to repair Kaleb’s heart arrhythmia — a condition called atrial fibrillation (AFib, for short) — were inserted through a cut in Kaleb’s groin, navigated up through a blood vessel in his torso and into a pulmonary vein in his heart. In most procedures, the affected area of the heart is, in effect, burned (or sometimes frozen) to contain the misfiring pulses that cause the irregular beats.

The procedure typically takes at least four hours, and this latest one was the third such procedure done on Kaleb’s heart. He hopes it is his last. His symptoms have improved dramatically. Rarely, and randomly, the irregular beats resurface, but much less frequently than before January’s procedure. The episodes have always been sporadic: he seemed just as likely to get one sitting in a classroom as he was working out or playing football.

One day this summer, he ran the upper stairs in Husky Stadium’s north bleachers with teammates, an exhaustive team conditioning test. A couple hours later, during a 75-minute interview on campus, he said he was feeling great — no issues at all. That’s been the norm of late, and as the start of Huskies fall camp approached earlier this month, the redshirt sophomore right tackle was eager and optimistic about the opportunity to play uninhibited.

UW’s doctors and trainers are also optimistic he will have that opportunity, even as the only football player with AFib issues to come through UW in Dr. Kimberly Harmon’s 18 years as the team’s head physician. She said he’s been “thoroughly” evaluated by the specialists at the sports cardiology center, and he goes through regular checkups. “Above and beyond what we put the other kids through,” she said.

“I try to make decisions like these like they’re my own kids,” she adds. “If Kaleb was my kid, would I let him play? The answer’s yes.”

I spent a lot of time just angry at the world — oh man, just furious with everything and everyone.” - Kaleb McGary 

(Harmon has done extensive research into heart issues in NCAA athletes, a journey set in motion on New Year’s Day 2002, when UW women’s basketball player Kayla Burt survived a sudden cardiac attack during a game. Since 2010, Harmon and UW doctors have screened every Husky student-athlete with an electrocardiography, which Harmon says can detect most heart issues and, she hopes, will become more prevalent and accessible for athletes everywhere. She co-authored a study published last year by the American Heart Association that called on the NCAA to better fund SCA screening methods. For the record, she’s had all three of her children screened with an ECG.)

 

Kaleb’s issues were not — are not — life-threatening, she said. “Just performance-limiting.”

When the episodes intensified for Kaleb two years ago, soon after arriving on campus as a freshman, he was treated with medication. He hated that. Made him feel like a “walking pharmacy.” The side effects at times felt worse than the worst heart beats: chronic stomach aches and headaches; constipation one day, diarrhea the next. “Just frickin’ awful, man. I was miserable,” he said.

That’s when they turned to the albation procedures and — “knock on wood,” Harmon said — the latest results have been promising. McGary reported to camp measuring 6-8 and 308 pounds. A few days earlier, his shirt off, he was showing off the muscles in his chiseled abs. He’s He-Man with a crew cut.

“He’s doing really well … but it’s been hard on him,” Harmon said. “It’s been particularly frustrating for Kaleb because he came in with such high expectation and really in his mind (has) underperformed. So it’s good to see him healthy.”

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6 minutes ago, caponine said:

Thank You !! Its never that serious enough to put a man's life in jeopardy just to entertain us and I wish you the best 

Glad you are here to provide the moral high-ground we have all been so sadly lacking. Where would the world be without this this kind of intervention from folks like you?

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