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Kaleb McGary to have heart procedure per team


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1 hour ago, Theyhateme : ) said:

Did we move back in the draft to get a player that had medical procedures on his heart twice previously or did the F.O. not know? So we are back to hoping Ty Sambrailo can handle the position.

The FO knew cause he has had this procedure TWICE before. If somehow they did not know then the front office needs to be let go.

You don't trade picks to get back in the first round for a player you have not properly vetted.

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21 hours ago, droopy1592 said:

Dude, I literally read EKGs and notice arrhythmias with my eyes closed everyday, plus deal with cardiac clearances and do long cases with patients with a fib. Please tell me more. 

Hey Droop my heart flutters from time to time. If I get pissed or excited or stressed it may do it. Sometimes it’ll do it when I wake up. I went to the doc and he said everything was normal with my vitals. He could see on the monitor whenever it would flutter but nothing in the EKG. This was almost 2 years ago. I workout, I run, I’m vegan, in good overall health. I do suffer from anxiety since I was fresh out of high school and it’s shown up in different ways once I learn how to deal with the way it attacks me. Could the flutters be a new way of my anxiety? Like I said it’s varied how it attacks me over the years when I master the symptoms of attacks. I never had this during my football playing days nor track. 

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21 hours ago, Tandy said:

Good luck young man!  Praying for you.

My son has Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and has had to have heart ablations done more than once.   He's usually down and out for a week or so - then he starts bouncing back.

He doesn't however, have the same strenuous job activities, so give the young man time to heal.   

Glad to see you in the board Tandy. I’ve had you in my thoughts. If you ever need to take your mind off things you know we got you!!! 

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39 minutes ago, TheFatboi said:

Hey Droop my heart flutters from time to time. If I get pissed or excited or stressed it may do it. Sometimes it’ll do it when I wake up. I went to the doc and he said everything was normal with my vitals. He could see on the monitor whenever it would flutter but nothing in the EKG. This was almost 2 years ago. I workout, I run, I’m vegan, in good overall health. I do suffer from anxiety since I was fresh out of high school and it’s shown up in different ways once I learn how to deal with the way it attacks me. Could the flutters be a new way of my anxiety? Like I said it’s varied how it attacks me over the years when I master the symptoms of attacks. I never had this during my football playing days nor track. 

Anxiety can boost the sympathetic parts of your nervous system, which increases catecholamine flow (endogenous epinephrine-> fight or flight mode) and also immediately activate cardio-accelerator nerves to your heart. A side effect of this is if you have any underlying almost-arrhythmias, the conduction issues are more likely to show when you’re anxious because your conduction process is being pushed to its physiological limits. 

Paroxysmal rhythms like this people generally live with. I wouldn’t worry about it unless it becomes persistent. Atrial flutter and a fib, in a persistent fashion, can cause you to stroke -or move clots formed in the left atrium (because the “flutter” lets blood pool in some areas in the atrium and not move appropriately and form clots) to your head or lungs and cause major problems. If your have a normal rhythm most of the time, I wouldn’t worry. If you have anxiety induced rhythms, best thing for you is to learn to breath appropriately and meditate... or ask your doctor for propranolol pills you can take before an event that you know will make you anxious... people actually take it before public speaking or performances. Your heart speeding up when you’re anxious involves a slight positive feedback loop that can make you more anxious because of your anxiety induced tachycardia or arrhythmia, because high heart rates make people feel anxious! This is why focusing on breathing and meditation can help. LoL, Hope that helps  

 

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41 minutes ago, Cole World said:

Really.....You talking to somebody who had the procedure twice. Look at my comment on the 2nd page.

Great but this particular person that we traded up in the first to get collapsed in camp before a single pre season game AFTER having the procedure twice so even after that it obviously did not fix it and it seems it may not be fixable.

This does not bode well for his NFL longevity, you are not in the NFL sorry workout all you want you are not dealing with the physcial toll of a professional NFL schedule and everyone is different as well. 

 

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7 minutes ago, droopy1592 said:

Anxiety can boost the sympathetic parts of your nervous system, which increases catecholamine flow (endogenous epinephrine-> fight or flight mode) and also immediately activate cardio-accelerator nerves to your heart. A side effect of this is if you have any underlying almost-arrhythmias, the conduction issues are more likely to show when you’re anxious because your conduction process is being pushed to its physiological limits. 

Paroxysmal rhythms like this people generally live with. I wouldn’t worry about it unless it becomes persistent. Atrial flutter and a fib, in a persistent fashion, can cause you to stroke -or move clots formed in the left atrium (because the “flutter” lets blood pool in some areas in the atrium and not move appropriately and form clots) to your head or lungs and cause major problems. If your have a normal rhythm most of the time, I wouldn’t worry. If you have anxiety induced rhythms, best thing for you is to learn to breath appropriately and meditate... or ask your doctor for propranolol pills you can take before an event that you know will make you anxious... people actually take it before public speaking or performances. Your heart speeding up when you’re anxious involves a slight positive feedback loop that can make you more anxious because of your anxiety induced tachycardia or arrhythmia, because high heart rates make people feel anxious! This is why focusing on breathing and meditation can help. LoL, Hope that helps  

 

Thanks droop. My fiancé was thinking it may be A fib but I felt it was more stress/anxiety related. I was supposed to see a cardiologist but never went. I just lowered my stress level, lowered my sodium intake and that seemed to help. It’s not constant like you mentioned but it will show up whenever I’m anxious or pissed. I mediate everyday. Been doing that for years. I’ve learned how to deal with anxiety and a doctor told me it will morph and show up in different ways the Better you learn how to deal with the symptoms. And the way I usually control it is I only worry about the things I can control. And breath. I don’t have the shortness of breath symptoms. I’ve long mastered that. That’s why it shows up in different ways, which is why I asked is the flutters possibly anxiety related or is there a arrhythmia I’ve developed? 

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3 minutes ago, MAD597 said:

Great but this particular person that we traded up in the first to get collapsed in camp before a single pre season game AFTER having the procedure twice so even after that it obviously did not fix it and it seems it may not be fixable.

This does not bode well for his NFL longevity, you are not in the NFL sorry workout all you want you are not dealing with the physcial toll of a professional NFL schedule and everyone is different as well. 

 

If they get the proper circuit that’s causing the problem he will be fine period. Like I said earlier, it’s the success rate we have to worry about. If he has this done in Atlanta, I think the probability of him being fixed goes up. Who knows where he had it done before. 

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6 minutes ago, MAD597 said:

Great but this particular person that we traded up in the first to get collapsed in camp before a single pre season game AFTER having the procedure twice so even after that it obviously did not fix it and it seems it may not be fixable.

This does not bode well for his NFL longevity, you are not in the NFL sorry workout all you want you are not dealing with the physcial toll of a professional NFL schedule and everyone is different as well. 

 

 

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1 minute ago, TheFatboi said:

Thanks droop. My fiancé was thinking it may be A fib but I felt it was more stress/anxiety related. I was supposed to see a cardiologist but never went. I just lowered my stress level, lowered my sodium intake and that seemed to help. It’s not constant like you mentioned but it will show up whenever I’m anxious or pissed. I mediate everyday. Been doing that for years. I’ve learned how to deal with anxiety and a doctor told me it will morph and show up in different ways the Better you learn how to deal with the symptoms. And the way I usually control it is I only worry about the things I can control. And breath. I don’t have the shortness of breath symptoms. I’ve long mastered that. That’s why it shows up in different ways, which is why I asked is the flutters possibly anxiety related or is there a arrhythmia I’ve developed? 

The conduction issue can get worse with age or be worsened by certain substances in your diet. High caffeine intake has been correlated with increased risk of arrhythmias. I’m really not sure why you have this issue as this isn’t my specialty, it’s just that with anesthesia we have to be intimate with cardiology and lung physiology. We know enough to be dangerous but not necessarily diagnose. Idiopathic/transient/paroxysmal pathological issues, whatever you want to call it, are the hardest thing in all of medicine to diagnose because you rarely see the issue in a controlled setting. 

I’m surprised you haven’t done a stress test or had some chemical acceleration testing to see what’s going on. It’s probably not a priority to a cardiologist if it’s not persistent or life-threatening.  

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12 minutes ago, MAD597 said:

Great but this particular person that we traded up in the first to get collapsed in camp before a single pre season game AFTER having the procedure twice so even after that it obviously did not fix it and it seems it may not be fixable.

This does not bode well for his NFL longevity, you are not in the NFL sorry workout all you want you are not dealing with the physcial toll of a professional NFL schedule and everyone is different as well. 

 

I for one am shocked that you of all people are being negative. Who would have seen it coming.

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7 minutes ago, BoomGoesTheDynamite said:

It's sad that I can get better and more up to date info from the message board and reddit than from a 'professional' beatwriter for the team

Sorry but it is a legit concern to spend so much on this player that has known health issues.

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13 minutes ago, LouDog said:

I for one am shocked that you of all people are being negative. Who would have seen it coming.

How is it being negative to question the idea that we drafted a player in the first round and had to use some other picks to get him when he had a known heart condition?

Come on, it's silly to not at least question the fact that that situation is a little problematic.

You guys are nuts

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3 minutes ago, MAD597 said:

How is it being negative to question the idea that we drafted a player in the first round and had to use some other picks to get him when he had a known heart condition?

Come on, it's silly to not at least question the fact that that situation is a little problematic.

You guys are nuts

When every single thing you say is negative, you quit getting the benefit of the doubt.

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Quote


Doctors give expert opinions on McGary’s heart situation

 

Recovery time is normally 8 to 12 weeks, but 6 to 8 for athletes

 

CANTON, OHIO  — 

Falcons rookie right tackle Kaleb McGary will likely be out six to eight weeks, but is expected to make a full recovery.

McGary, had his third heart procedure to fix an irregular heart beat, on Wednesday. 

“First of all, he’s got this heart problem that is not life threatening,” said Shephal Doshi, a cardiac electrophysiologist and director of cardiac electrophysiology and pacing at Providence Saint John’s Health Center in Santa Monica, Ca. “It’s something that can be fixed and sometimes it takes a couple of times to fix it.

But what he’s got is like an electrical short-circuit in his heart. When most people think of heart disease, they think of a blocked artery and a heart attack. That’s plumbing. This is electrical. It’s not the same problem.”

If he’s out for six weeks, he’d miss only the season opener. If he’s out eight weeks, he’d miss the first three games of the season. 

McGary left practice on Tuesday with what the team called an “illness.” 

It was announced that he would have an ablation procedure on Wednesday, but the team did not have a timetable. 

“Six to eight weeks, is very common,” Doshi said. “Usually, we do 8 to 12 weeks, but because he’s young, he may not need the full 12 weeks and they can probably get away with eight. It depends on how much they burned when they get in there. They may find out they don’t need to burn that much and may just say four weeks. It’s good to plan for six to eight, just in case, but he may have a speedier recovery than that.”

But what he’s got is like an electrical short-circuit in his heart. When most people think of heart disease, they think of a blocked artery and a heart attack. That’s plumbing. This is electrical. It’s not the same problem.”

If he’s out for six weeks, he’d miss only the season opener. If he’s out eight weeks, he’d miss the first three games of the season.

McGary left practice on Tuesday with what the team called an “illness.”

It was announced that he would have an ablation procedure on Wednesday, but the team did not have a timetable.

“Six to eight weeks, is very common,” Doshi said. “Usually, we do 8 to 12 weeks, but because he’s young, he may not need the full 12 weeks and they can probably get away with eight. It depends on how much they burned when they get in there. They may find out they don’t need to burn that much and may just say four weeks. It’s good to plan for six to eight, just in case, but he may have a speedier recovery than that.”

David Chao, a former team doctor with the San Diego Chargers, is not overly concerned about McGary’s condition.

“This certainly sounds scary, but he was cleared by doctors at the combine,” Chao wrote in his preseason newsletter. “The good news is he should be back well before the start of the regular season. He likely has an irregular heartbeat that can be treated with medication, but there are side effects if he chose that route.

“An ablation procedure is done through the leg vein and requires no true incision. The fact that this is his (third) is not alarming as it is always better to do to little vs. too much. This sounds like a bigger deal than it will be.

“During my NFL medical career, we had players with these procedures in season and the public never even knew about it. McGary should be fine for football in very short order.”

McGary is expected to make a full recovery.  

“This won’t affect his ability to play football long term,” Doshi said. “There was the relief pitcher from the Dodgers, Kenley Jansen, who had to stop playing baseball during the season because he had to get the procedure done. We do see it in athletes and young people.”

There could be complications.

“One of the reasons that he can’t play for six to eight weeks, once you get the procedure done, you have to take a blood thinner for two months because this burning in the heart can cause a blood clot,” Doshi said. “So, you have to take a blood thinner after the procedure. So, while he’s on the blood thinner for about two months, he really can’t play football.”

The risk of getting hit and internal bleeding comes with taking blood thinners.  

“But during the two month period, he can exercise,” Doshi said. “He can work out. He’s free to lift weights. He just can’t do contact stuff.”

McGary’s heart problems first started in high school, according to the Seattle Times.

His heart arrhythmia caused him to lose consciousness while playing in a basketball game at Fife High School in January of 2013.

There were three subsequent procedures, according to the Times.

McGary was signed to a four-year, $10.2 million deal on May 10. A total of $9.1 million of the deal was guaranteed.

The Falcons were aware of his heart condition.

“You heart beats because of electricity,” Doshi said. “You can imagine that heart is full of electric light bulbs and there is a switch that goes on and off, making the heartbeat. Well, one of his light bulbs has a short circuit kind of like the ones in the kitchen that start flickering when the bulb get old. What happens is that causes his heart to go out of rhythm.”

Doctors are more aggressive with younger patients.

“It’s very common for people who over 70,” Doshi said. “Almost 10 percent of the population has it. But it’s not as common when people are young. When people are young they feel it more. They often feel like their heart is bouncing out of their chest. Sometimes they can feel dizzy. They can feel light-headed and be short of breath. They can have more fatigue.”

According to the Falcons, this will be his third procedure.

“The reason he’s having a third procedure is that sometimes its hard to find that right spot,” Doshi said. “That doesn’t mean that he’s not curable. It just means that they haven’t found the right light bulb yet, so they keep calling the electrician back.”

 

 

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5 minutes ago, MAD597 said:

How is it being negative to question the idea that we drafted a player in the first round and had to use some other picks to get him when he had a known heart condition?

Come on, it's silly to not at least question the fact that that situation is a little problematic.

You guys are nuts

Have yet to see you have a positive take on anything on this board. When every single thing you post is negative, people are going to discount it.

There's a possibility that Kaleb will have this procedure and then never be bothered by this again for his career.  Completely discounting that possibility is just being negative, not realistic.

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