⚡Slumerican⚡

2 weeks to first game

49 posts in this topic

1 minute ago, falconsd56 said:

We should grab a beverage and catch the first quarter

We should, though for the HoF game I won't be in town.  I'll be streaming.  DM me when the regular season comes around and are you planning on going to the Falcons/Cards game?  

falconsd56 likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, athell said:

We should, though for the HoF game I won't be in town.  I'll be streaming.  DM me when the regular season comes around and are you planning on going to the Falcons/Cards game?  

Gotcha.

 

Yeah i am planning on the cards game for sure....I am actually going to be putting a get together set up for the Cards game 

So far about 30 people have expressed interest...once we get closer to the game (about a month out) I am going to hammer out details

athell likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, falconsd56 said:

Gotcha.

 

Yeah i am planning on the cards game for sure....I am actually going to be putting a get together set up for the Cards game 

So far about 30 people have expressed interest...once we get closer to the game (about a month out) I am going to hammer out details

Sweet.  I am for sure going to that Cards game so lemme know bruh!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
45 minutes ago, athell said:

I'll probably watch the first few mins then peace out.

- Things casual fans do

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, vel said:

Electric. Always for taking chances on players like this. Positionless athletes who can kill you with the ball in their hands in space. 

This is partly why I'm confident in the offense going forward. They added two positionless weapons in Green and Brooks-James. Stocker looks like he's going to be a positionless style guy as well. Think about this:

The Falcons can trot out a full house formation with Julio and Ridley on the outside with Green, Stocker, and Freeman in the backfield. Shift that to a 11 personnel set with Green in the slot and Stocker at the TE spot and Freeman next to Matt. 

Your terminology is very similar to Shannahan.  I am actually surprised you are not a bigger fan of his approach:

 

Kyle Shanahan on the cutting edge with 'positionless' offense

 

The 49ers offense could have a much different look in 2019, and it’s not just because they’re getting injured players back. It appears head coach Kyle Shanahan is constructing an offense that pushes the typical boundaries of the way teams think about that side of the ball.

49ers running back Tevin Coleman, who spent his first two NFL seasons in Atlanta where Shanahan was the offensive coordinator, told reporters that he’s noticed a difference in the coach’s scheme since he last played in the offense in 2016 with the Atlanta Falcons.

“He’s definitely more creative than he was in Atlanta, everything he’s doing with the backs, tight ends and receivers,” Coleman said according to Cam Inman of the Mercury News.

 

 

The running back went on to say he’s lining up more as a receiver than he ever did during Shanahan’s tenure with the Falcons. That’s an interesting note when considering the type of players the 49ers have been stockpiling over the last two seasons.

Let’s consider the 2018 49ers for a moment. The fully healthy version of that offense featured versatile running backs Jerick McKinnon and Matt Breida. In the backfield with them was Swiss army knife fullback Kyle Juszczyk who can line up anywhere on the field. It also had an extremely athletic tight end, George Kittle. Those four alone all had the ability to stretch their on-field responsibilities outside of those typical for their positions.

The receiving corps lacked in that area, and Shanahan made it a point this offseason to change that. He even told reporters at the owners meetings that versatility from his receivers would be something he wanted to fix over the offseason. He wanted more pass catchers who could line up in different areas and take on different responsibilities in the offense.

That trend toward more interchangeable pieces started in free agency when the team added Coleman to their already crowded backfield. Then they signed wide receiver Jordan Matthews to a one-year deal. Matthews can play any of the receiver spots in the 49ers offense.

Shanahan’s mission of offensive versatility continued in the draft when they used their second- and third-round picks on wide receivers Deebo Samuel and Jalen Hurd. Samuel is capable of the same versatility as Matthews, while Samuel is a converted running back who played a do-everything role during his final year at Baylor.

Prioritizing a receiver in the second round wasn’t a huge surprise, but the Hurd selection in the third is a massive indicator of what San Francisco’s head coach has planned for his offensive attack.

 

 

“Positionless” is the phrase du jour for describing what the 49ers are building on offense. They’re stocking up on players who allow them to vary their play calls and formations without ever changing the personnel. That layer of unpredictability is potentially deadly in a league where opposing coaches feast on tendencies.

Shanahan was already on the forefront of this concept last season. San Francisco ran 11 personnel (one running back, one tight end) with three receivers only 39 percent of the time last season, according to Sharp Football Stats. The next-lowest in the league was New Orleans at 53 percent. The NFL as a whole used 11 personnel a whopping 66 percent of the time, and passed out of that formation at the same rate. San Francisco passed out of 11 personnel 83 percent of the time. It’s the most predictable of the common personnel groupings, and the 49ers utilized it far less than the rest of the league.

 
 

Where Shanahan varies greatly from the rest of the league is in the use of 21 personnel (two running backs, one tight end) with two receivers. NFL teams on average use 21 personnel just 8 percent of the time. San Francisco utilized 42 percent of their offensive snaps in 2018. By comparison, New England runs it 28 percent of the time; no other team eclipsed 15 percent, and the Rams didn’t use it once. While the league had a 40-60 pass-to-run ratio out of 21 personnel, the 49ers were at 46-54.

Keeping defenses off balance through personnel groupings will be a hallmark of the 2019 iteration of the 49ers offense.

One example that comes to mind is in 11 personnel. The 49ers will be able to deploy an 11 personnel package where Jalen Hurd is one of the three receivers, but he lines up as a tight end and gives it more of a 12 look (one running back, two tight ends) with two receivers.

RELATED

The next play could feature the same group with Hurd lining up as a running back and the running back splitting out wide to give a more traditional 11 look with a wide receiver in the backfield. They could even empty the backfield and essentially turn that package into a five wide receiver set.

It’s a fascinating concept that could turn the 49ers’ offense into a tornado of varying personnel packages that tears up every offensive norm or tendency defensive coaches rely on.

A few obstacles stand in the way of this offensive revolution. Health is an obvious one, with quarterback Jimmy Garoppolo and McKinnon both missing most of all of last season with torn ACLs. Several members of the receiving corps dealt with injuries last season too, including Dante Pettis, who’s expected to be a key part of the passing attack. Any limitations from a roster standpoint could handcuff the coaching staff in terms of utilizing the various skill sets of their own

Another big one is the development of rookies Samuel and Hurd. Their quick learning would be immensely helpful for San Francisco as they try and expand the playbook for players at different spots. It’d be a significant blow to the advancement of Shanahan’s offense if Samuel can only handle one receiver job, or Hurd doesn’t catch on quick enough to play a couple of different positions.

Shanahan’s innovative thinking on offense helped spawn head coaches like the Rams’ Sean McVay and the Packers’ Matt LaFleur. It doesn’t look like the coach is settling with a very good scheme. The 49ers are continuing to adapt to the ever-changing NFL, and if things go right, San Francisco will be several steps ahead of everyone else.

Tim Mazetti likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Sun Tzu 7 said:

“Game”. 

I wouldn’t call it that.  This is like the 4th preseason game but TG will be walking around the sidelines.

Trying to watch oline play,  especially the 2s & 3s, in a preseason game is a tough task.  Let alone the HOF game.

Maybe 10 minutes is all i can see myself doing.

10 mins lol..... I won’t miss a minute and will prolly rewatch the game just to try and evaluate some rookies and 2-3rd  teamers that’s what preseason is all about. However - the boo birds will be here in full form if we lose this meaningless game. 

⚡Slumerican⚡ likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, FalconsIn2020 said:

Your terminology is very similar to Shannahan.  I am actually surprised you are not a bigger fan of his approach:

 

Oh I am. It makes it very hard to cover guys. You're always trying to get DCs to be wrong in their responses to what you do. I prefer McVay's approach to overloading on 11 personnel vs Kyle's preference of under center, two back sets, but other than they, they both do the same. They want to create mismatches from the huddle to the snap. You can see Coleman going in the game and a slot WR coming out. What's your response? Do you keep your nickel on the field to guard Coleman? Then I'll motion Kittle to FB and Coleman to RB and run it. Put a LB with him and I'll motion Coleman outside the numbers and kill that LB. It's endless. 

I think you'll see some of that on defense with DQ. Kazee is a positionless DB. Nickel, corner, deep safety, robber. Doesn't matter. Neal is the same. Debo is the same. Campbell a little bit as well. You need guys who can cover these positionless players too. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, vel said:

Oh I am. It makes it very hard to cover guys. You're always trying to get DCs to be wrong in their responses to what you do. I prefer McVay's approach to overloading on 11 personnel vs Kyle's preference of under center, two back sets, but other than they, they both do the same. They want to create mismatches from the huddle to the snap. You can see Coleman going in the game and a slot WR coming out. What's your response? Do you keep your nickel on the field to guard Coleman? Then I'll motion Kittle to FB and Coleman to RB and run it. Put a LB with him and I'll motion Coleman outside the numbers and kill that LB. It's endless. 

I think you'll see some of that on defense with DQ. Kazee is a positionless DB. Nickel, corner, deep safety, robber. Doesn't matter. Neal is the same. Debo is the same. Campbell a little bit as well. You need guys who can cover these positionless players too. 

Exactly why I have such a passion for the Shannahan/Kubiak/McVay West Coast principles in the pass game with a ZBS.

If Koetter is willing to master the nuances of our playbook, he could completely alter the course of his coaching career.   Cause I have no doubt he knows when to call certain plays...he gets how to sequence plays and series.  It’s the window dressing and winning pre-snap that this playbook can bring to make his life easier.

Tim Mazetti likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
34 minutes ago, FalconsIn2020 said:

Exactly why I have such a passion for the Shannahan/Kubiak/McVay West Coast principles in the pass game with a ZBS.

If Koetter is willing to master the nuances of our playbook, he could completely alter the course of his coaching career.   Cause I have no doubt he knows when to call certain plays...he gets how to sequence plays and series.  It’s the window dressing and winning pre-snap that this playbook can bring to make his life easier.

That's why I keep trying to remind yall that him and Andy Reid go wayyyyyy back. I would not be surprised if you see some influences of what Andy has done in KC come over. The rest of the league saw what the Chiefs did. The smart/good OCs will have watched that film this summer and be adding some in. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
52 minutes ago, vel said:

Then I'll motion Kittle to FB and Coleman to RB and run it. Put a LB with him and I'll motion Coleman outside the numbers and kill that LB. It's endless. 

Dammit Vel.

DK needs you as a consultant.

ShadyRef and vel like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
55 minutes ago, vel said:

think you'll see some of that on defense with DQ. Kazee is a positionless DB. Nickel, corner, deep safety, robber. Doesn't matter. Neal is the same. Debo is the same. Campbell a little bit as well. You need guys who can cover these positionless players too. 

You did it again on the D.

Dammit, I learn alot on this board from people like you.

vel, ⚡Slumerican⚡ and ShadyRef like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, vel said:

I'll watch it because I've never seen them play the HOF game. But I expect the important players to be pulled early. That includes Lindstrom and McGary. I think they get 2-3 drives and will be sat. I am excited though to see the rest of the draft picks, particularly Marcus Green. I hope they have plans for him. Haven't had a player like him in a long time, but is one of those guys that gives the league fits (a la Tyreek Hill, Tarik Cohen, Darren Sproles). He can line up in the backfield and be a threat on toss sweeps but also be a threat in space vs LBs. He can line up in the slot and be a threat on jet sweeps but also deep downfield. He allows for a TON of flexibility. 

Was thinking the same thing. Green/Ollison/Miller will be fun to watch. 

Russell Gage at WR is another young player I hope will get some meaningful PT. 

FalconsIn2020, athell, vel and 2 others like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, ShmevinShmarris said:

Maybe it’s just me but the HOF game is treated like a holiday in my household.

Since its the first game of the new season, im probably gonna treat it like the super bowl lol... Beer, wings, grill fired up.. Maybe overkill, but im so ready for football :slick:

high impact likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, ⚡Slumerican⚡ said:

Since its the first game of the new season, im probably gonna treat it like the super bowl lol... Beer, wings, grill fired up.. Maybe overkill, but im so ready for football :slick:

This guy gets it

⚡Slumerican⚡ likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Atl Falcon said:

10 mins lol..... I won’t miss a minute and will prolly rewatch the game just to try and evaluate some rookies and 2-3rd  teamers that’s what preseason is all about. However - the boo birds will be here in full form if we lose this meaningless game. 

Yeah I used to do that but after 5-10 years of it I realized you don’t really get anything from watching past the 1st half... and that’s the 2nd-3rd preseason game.

For the HOF game you’d be lucky if 3 of the guys playing the 2nd half are even if the NFL in 2 weeks.

⚡Slumerican⚡ likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now