Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Falcons Fan MVP

How good do you think Quadree Ollison will be?

125 posts in this topic

22 minutes ago, athell said:

I dunno if you heard 2012, but we have monsters up and down the line now that all block out the sun when they move so therefore our oline is going to be tops in the league and get infinite push and not collapse the pocket at Matt's feet.  So it hath been sayeth, so shall it be...ith.

Also our 2016 line was doodoo...

LOL...I wonder why ppl dont appreciate that line.  It wasn’t physically dominant but it was a great ZBS line 

athell likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Falconsin2012 said:

LOL...I wonder why ppl dont appreciate that line.  It wasn’t physically dominant but it was a great ZBS line 

They were weak and covered up by playcalling apparently...who knew?

FalconsIn2012 likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/26/2019 at 6:31 PM, Yo_Lover said:

I hate player comparisons so much man. This guy runs hard, he's Steven Jackson. This guy is as tall as Julio and runs fast so he's another Julio. But but this guy is a 5'10 FS, he's Earl Thomas. ******* annoying. When have two players ever been the ******* same? Ever? Every player is different, every player has different skills. We will never, ever see another Kam, Julio, Calvin, Brady, Lynch, Wagner, Deion, etc. 

I see what you are saying and agree to an extent.  Most player comparisons tend to be overly optimistic but I think it is helpful for fans who have no background in scouting to have a frame of reference for the type of player they could become.  Just as with any opinion take it with a grain of salt.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, autigerfan said:

I see what you are saying and agree to an extent.  Most player comparisons tend to be overly optimistic but I think it is helpful for fans who have no background in scouting to have a frame of reference for the type of player they could become.  Just as with any opinion take it with a grain of salt.

I can understand that but to call Ollison a Steven Jackson or Tevin Coleman is just awful. Plus it gives fans unrealistic expectations. If he doesn't ball out like Steven but is a solid contributor they'll cry and scream bust.

Knight of God and papachaz like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Yo_Lover said:

Can you not read? I said "if you'd actually watch him". Let me help you out "IF YOU ACTUALLY WATCH HIM".

Let's see if you catch it this time.

Let's start from square one since you read what you wanna read. Poster post a description of said player, no video, just words.. I respond to HIM, with a response in a question form stating it seems as if he's another Teco. Im not concerned about what the video could of showed me. Or else I'd of watched some, instead of stating clearly that I've  not watched any video.. So catch these nuts and go look dumb responding to someone else FOH my guy. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, Dirtybird3 said:

 

I mean, enlighten me. I haven't seen a second of footage, but goin off the description given of : fast, runs north and south, no moves, isn't running people over, sounds like shoe string tackle Teco to me lol

Lol are you trying to say you were asking a question here? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, Dirtybird3 said:

Let's start from square one since you read what you wanna read. Poster post a description of said player, no video, just words.. I respond to HIM, with a response in a question form stating it seems as if he's another Teco. Im not concerned about what the video could of showed me. Or else I'd of watched some, instead of stating clearly that I've  not watched any video.. So catch these nuts and go look dumb responding to someone else FOH my guy. 

You didn't ask a question. You said he sounds like Teco. So quit being a mindless sheep, watch the guy play, and form your own opinion instead of listening to daddy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, egoprime II said:

You know, I read somewhere that Ollison is over 220 lbs.....then I -think- I saw a draft review....can't recall which one....that stated Ollison is a 230 lb back.  Which one is correct, I dunno...

I do know Stocker is supposed to excel as a blocking FB.

230 is over 220 so...

egoprime II likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Falconsin2012 said:

Everyone already claiming our OL is better than our 2016 & 2017 OL is humorous.  Let’s see how they work as a unit

Our O-line wasn’t as good as the numbers suggest. Kyle’s game planning/play calling and MR2’s quick release made them look better than they were. This was painfully obvious anytime we played a physical front 4 (I.e. Philly)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, shockerfalcon said:

Our O-line wasn’t as good as the numbers suggest. Kyle’s game planning/play calling and MR2’s quick release made them look better than they were. This was painfully obvious anytime we played a physical front 4 (I.e. Philly)

Yeah, my standard response when someone asks who Ryan has made better is "The Oline"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm optimistic, he is fast, he is big and he has good vision. I think over all he will be better than Freeman cause Freeman will sit ont he bench injured till we end up cutting Freeman and I think Ollison will end up our feature back long term.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, egoprime II said:

One thing I have  never ever liked about the way TD drafts, is his emphasis on special teams in the late rounds.  To me a team should draft every possible starter they can, no matter the round.  Late picks like Ephraam Salaam  Travis Hall and RB Jamaal Anderson helped power the Falcons to a Super Bowl.  If TD had been in charge, they may not have even been drafted by us.

The last two drafts the Falcons have been looking at DT in the first.  Using a fifth on Mack in a deep DT draft would have been a good value.  As it is, Mack was drafted by the Ravens, who routinely develop excellent DTs.

Maybe Ollison would have been there in the sixth.  Ozighbo was, he went undrafted.  At any rate, I think we needed to go with Mack in the fifth then hoped for Ollison in the sixth.

And to add to that even NFL.com thinks he was a UDFA talent 

egoprime II likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, shockerfalcon said:

Our O-line wasn’t as good as the numbers suggest. Kyle’s game planning/play calling and MR2’s quick release made them look better than they were. This was painfully obvious anytime we played a physical front 4 (I.e. Philly)

KS system actually puts more stress on the OL.  The wide receiver routes take longer to unfold, requiring better line play.

Vandy likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, shockerfalcon said:

Our O-line wasn’t as good as the numbers suggest. Kyle’s game planning/play calling and MR2’s quick release made them look better than they were. This was painfully obvious anytime we played a physical front 4 (I.e. Philly)

Our OL was excellent in 2016. It was a big underrated reason why we had one of best offenses in history. 

Ergo Proxy and FalconsIn2012 like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
59 minutes ago, MAD597 said:

I'm optimistic, he is fast, he is big and he has good vision. I think over all he will be better than Freeman cause Freeman will sit ont he bench injured till we end up cutting Freeman and I think Ollison will end up our feature back long term.

How about we let him try to beat out Ito for the #2 spot before claiming he is better than Freeman...lol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, Falconsin2012 said:

How about we let him try to beat out Ito for the #2 spot before claiming he is better than Freeman...lol

Shoot i have him 4th on the depth chart right now

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

He will be a bigger, faster,more effective version on Jason Snelling.  Good blocker, run with authority, and a asset in the pass game too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/26/2019 at 6:32 PM, ATLSlobberKnockers said:

I see a very solid 3rd down back with no glaring weaknesses.

Same here, bro. I feel like he could be a devastating weapon for us in the fourth quarter to lock up games where we have a lead. Think the OL will be able to hold its own now, including those last critical 8-10 minutes in the fourth quarter.

falconidae likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, GrimeyKidd said:

And to add to that even NFL.com thinks he was a UDFA talent 

Don't get me wrong, I'm glad we have Ollison.   I think we could have gotten Mack and Ollison both.

If Mack had worked out, the Falcons may have been spared from using a high pick on DT next year.

Maybe DQ feels so good about the current DT situation that he saw no need for more help there?  If so, I hope he's right....

GrimeyKidd likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Vandy said:

Our OL was excellent in 2016. It was a big underrated reason why we had one of best offenses in history. 

Our O-line was rated high and they were consistent and healthy all 16 games but they were not excellent by any stretch of the imagination. The best I can say is that they didn’t make many mistakes but they never dominated any opponent the way some lines that year did like Dallas for example

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Falconsin2012 said:

KS system actually puts more stress on the OL.  The wide receiver routes take longer to unfold, requiring better line play.

Negative Kyle runs a west coast type offense which is naturally predicated on short quick passes. The only long developing plays in his playbook are play action passes which are easier on the O-line

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, shockerfalcon said:

Negative Kyle runs a west coast type offense which is naturally predicated on short quick passes. The only long developing plays in his playbook are play action passes which are easier on the O-line

His is a vertical WCO...not sticks & posts.  Completely different from a Walsh WCO.  That’s why it’s so play action dependent., 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
28 minutes ago, shockerfalcon said:

Negative Kyle runs a west coast type offense which is naturally predicated on short quick passes. The only long developing plays in his playbook are play action passes which are easier on the O-line

Grant Cohn: Defining Kyle Shanahan's offense

Kyle Shanahan does not run the freaking West Coast Offense.

Don’t take it from me — take it from Shanahan himself. He educated a local reporter about a year ago. The reporter had requested a one-on-one interview with Shanahan, who rarely grants one on ones with locals. Before turning down this poor reporter, Shanahan asked what the topic of the interview would be.

The reporter said it was simple. He wanted to write a story praising Shanahan for connecting the 49ers to their roots by bringing back the West Coast Offense. They hadn’t used it in decades despite popularizing it during the 1980s under head coach Bill Walsh, the inventor of the scheme. This reporter saw Shanahan as a disciple of Walsh.

“I don’t run the freaking West Coast Offense,” Shanahan explained, except he didn’t use the word, “freaking.” He used a different word we can’t print.

At its heart, the West Coast Offense is a conservative, ball-control offense. Walsh called a series of short and intermediate passes which he considered “extended handoffs.” He used these to maintain possession, take time off the clock and set up running plays for the second half. Of course, Walsh called the occasional deep pass, but, for the most part, it was a conservative offense.

The Shanahan Offense is completely opposite. It’s an aggressive, big-play offense which features running plays that set up deep play-action passes.

In basketball terms, the Shanahans are similar to Don Nelson, who wanted his players to shoot lots of low-percentage 3-pointers. Walsh was more like Phil Jackson, who wanted his players to shoot high-percentage layups and mid-range jumpers.

I’m not saying one style is better than the other. I merely am describing the difference.

The West Coast Offense uses a “gap” blocking scheme, in which offensive linemen block in different directions. Some block at an angle and hit defensive linemen from the side. Other offensive linemen pull, meaning they run in the backfield from one side of the formation all the way to the other during the play. Gap blocking looks like a bunch of crisscrosses.

The Shanahan Offense primarily uses “zone” blocking, which looks like a conga line — five offensive linemen and one tight end running horizontally along the line of scrimmage in unison. No crisscrossing.

The West Coast Offense features a diverse running game with dozens of different types of draws — a run which first looks like a pass. The opposite of play-action, which is a pass that first looks like a run. The draw is integral to this scheme.

The Shanahan Offense features a simple running game with two main plays — inside zone and outside zone. The draw is not integral to this scheme.

The West Coast Offense rolls the quarterback out of the pocket so he can make short, quick throws. Think the legendary Sprint Right Option. The quarterback takes the snap, immediately sprints a few steps to his right and fires a pass to a wide receiver running a shallow route toward the sideline. This fast-developing play is a staple of the West Coast Offense.

The Shanahan Offense rolls the quarterback out of the pocket so he can make long throws downfield. The offensive line typically blocks for an outside zone run, the quarterback fakes the handoff, runs a naked bootleg away from the offensive line, takes 13 or 14 steps and throws deep. This slow-developing play is a staple of the Shanahan Offense.

The goal of the West Coast Offense is to consistently pick up at least four yards per play and reach “third and manageable” — between third and four and third and six. When Walsh installed his third-down offense every year during training camp, he always started with third and four to third and six.

The goal of the Shanahan Offense is to create big plays and avoid third down entirely. Meaning the quarterback throws beyond the first-down marker as much as possible. When it’s second and eight, the Shanahan Offense aims to reach first and 10, not third and four.

Walsh developed the West Coast Offense in Cincinnati when he was the Bengals’ offensive coordinator. In that sense, you could call it the Midwest Offense.

Mike Shanahan developed his scheme in Denver under head coach Dan Reeves, who believed in running up the gut to set up deep play-action passes — classic smash-mouth football. Shanahan tweaked Reeves’ philosophy by replacing the smash-mouth aspect with finesse outside-zone runs. In that sense, you could call Shanahan’s scheme the Rocky Mountain Offense.

Just don’t call it the freaking West Coast Offense, please.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0