Geneaut

Ex-Atlanta Falcons player from the 1990s sentenced to 151 months in prison

87 posts in this topic

I hate to see this. I remember Tippins.

https://www.11alive.com/article/sports/nfl/atlanta-falcons/ex-atlanta-falcons-player-from-the-1990s-sentenced-to-151-months-in-prison/85-fe7cb7a3-6e5a-4e37-a9a5-3ddeedda260a

Kenneth Tippins Sr. was sentenced to 12 years, 7 months in prison last week, after pleading guilty to one count of possession of cocaine with intent to distribute.
 
Author: Jay Clemons
Published: 3:04 PM EDT April 16, 2019
Updated: 5:31 PM EDT April 16, 2019

Former Atlanta Falcons linebacker Kenneth Tippins Sr. was sentenced to 151 months in prison last week, reportedly after pleading guilty to one count of possession of cocaine with intent to distribute, according to the U.S. attorney's office for the Middle District of Georgia.

Tippins, whose seven-year NFL career included six seasons with the Falcons (1990-95), will also have three years of supervisory release, after his prison sentence concludes.

According to WALB-TV in Albany, the judge presiding over the case characterized Tippins (three previous drug convictions) as a "career offender."

Assuming Tippins serves his full term, he wouldn't be released from prison until after his 64th birthday; with the three subsequent years of supervision, that would put the Adel, Ga. native under police observation until age 67.

Tippins (two career interceptions with the Falcons) had been arrested on felony drug charges (intent to distribute cocaine) in March 2008 and sentenced to 10 years in prison sometime in 2009. 

However, Tippins reportedly served just one-plus year of time.

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You can kill someone and do less time.  Clear abuse of judicial discretion

While I don’t condone his behavior, 3 years is plenty if nobody was hurt.  This is why the “home of the free” has twice as many people incarcerated as any other country.  Prison is now big business

United States constitutes 4.4% of the worlds population but houses 22% of the worlds prisoners

The most alarming stat: approximately $80 billion is still spent each year on corrections facilities alone, according to a Prison Policy Initiative report, dwarfing the $68 billion discretionary budget of the Department of Education.

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3 minutes ago, quotemokc said:

12 years seems a bit much. 

Unless he had loads of coke or had priors

He had priors. It mentioned he was sentenced to 10 years in 2009, but only served one.

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7 minutes ago, Falconsin2012 said:

You can kill someone and do less time.  Clear abuse of judicial discretion

While I don’t condone his behavior, 3 years is plenty if nobody was hurt.  This is why the “home of the free” has twice as many people incarcerated as any other country.  Prison is now big business

United States constitutes 4.4% of the worlds population but houses 22% of the worlds prisoners

I'm slowly coming around to that line of thinking myself. The War on Drugs isn't going well from that standpoint.

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Just now, Falconsin2012 said:

We spent 80 billion on corrections facilities but just 60 billion on education.  Think about that 

It's a crying shame. I fully get the need to be 'tough' on crime, but at a certain point, it becomes counter-productive. 

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4 minutes ago, Geneaut said:

It's a crying shame. I fully get the need to be 'tough' on crime, but at a certain point, it becomes counter-productive. 

Better education leads to less crime.  It’s a fact.   And once you arrest someone they struggle to find decent jobs to contribute in society.  Sets them up for failure

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Met Kenny once. He come into the retail store I manage and bought some furniture. He was elated, almost embarrassed that I recognized him. He sat down and talked Falcons' and NFL football with me for hours. Nice guy. I knew he had some legal problems. This saddens me.

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19 minutes ago, Falconsin2012 said:

You can kill someone and do less time.  Clear abuse of judicial discretion

While I don’t condone his behavior, 3 years is plenty if nobody was hurt.  This is why the “home of the free” has twice as many people incarcerated as any other country.  Prison is now big business

United States constitutes 4.4% of the worlds population but houses 22% of the worlds prisoners

The most alarming stat: approximately $80 billion is still spent each year on corrections facilities alone, according to a Prison Policy Initiative report, dwarfing the $68 billion discretionary budget of the Department of Education.

It’s disgusting. Systemic racism in action (but white people get screwed by our “Justice” system too...).

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15 minutes ago, Drunken Minotaur Zebra said:

It’s disgusting. Systemic racism in action (but white people get screwed by our “Justice” system too...).

It isn’t racial....this is about dollars now.  It’s big business and quite honestly a blight on the country

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4 minutes ago, falken said:

Met Kenny once. He come into the retail store I manage and bought some furniture. He was elated, almost embarrassed that I recognized him. He sat down and talked Falcons' and NFL football with me for hours. Nice guy. I knew he had some legal problems. This saddens me.

Hope he works through this to the best of his abilities. I hate to see this kind of thing happening to childhood 'heroes'. I was 18 when he joined the Falcons.

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This article makes you want to puke:

Human rights organizations, as well as political and social ones, are condemning what they are calling a new form of inhumane exploitation in the United States, where they say a prison population of up to 2 million – mostly Black and Hispanic – are working for various industries for a pittance. For the tycoons who have invested in the prison industry, it has been like finding a pot of gold. They don’t have to worry about strikes or paying unemployment insurance, vacations or comp time. All of their workers are full-time, and never arrive late or are absent because of family problems; moreover, if they don’t like the pay of 25 cents an hour and refuse to work, they are locked up in isolation cells.

There are approximately 2 million inmates in state, federal and private prisons throughout the country. According to California Prison Focus, “no other society in human history has imprisoned so many of its own citizens.”

The figures show that the United States has locked up more people than any other country: a half million more than China, which has a population five times greater than the U.S. Statistics reveal that the United States holds 25% of the world’s prison population, but only 5% of the world’s people. From less than 300,000 inmates in 1972, the jail population grew to 2 million by the year 2000. In 1990 it was one million. Ten years ago there were only five private prisons in the country, with a population of 2,000 inmates; now, there are 100, with 62,000 inmates. It is expected that by the coming decade, the number will hit 360,000, according to reports.

What has happened over the last 10 years? Why are there so many prisoners?

“The private contracting of prisoners for work fosters incentives to lock people up. Prisons depend on this income. Corporate stockholders who make money off prisoners’ work lobby for longer sentences, in order to expand their workforce. The system feeds itself,” says a study by the Progressive Labor Party, which accuses the prison industry of being “an imitation of Nazi Germany with respect to forced slave labor and concentration camps.”

The prison industry complex is one of the fastest-growing industries in the United States and its investors are on Wall Street. “This multimillion-dollar industry has its own trade exhibitions, conventions, websites, and mail-order/Internet catalogs. It also has direct advertising campaigns, architecture companies, construction companies, investment houses on Wall Street, plumbing supply companies, food supply companies, armed security, and padded cells in a large variety of colors.”

CRIME GOES DOWN, JAIL POPULATION GOES UP

According to reports by human rights organizations, these are the factors that increase the profit potential for those who invest in the prison industry complex:

  • Jailing persons convicted of non-violent crimes, and long prison sentences for possession of microscopic quantities of illegal drugs. Federal law stipulates five years’ imprisonment without possibility of parole for possession of 5 grams of crack or 3.5 ounces of heroin, and 10 years for possession of less than 2 ounces of rock-cocaine or crack. A sentence of 5 years for cocaine powder requires possession of 500 grams – 100 times more than the quantity of rock cocaine for the same sentence. Most of those who use cocaine powder are white, middle-class or rich people, while mostly Blacks and Latinos use rock cocaine. In Texas, a person may be sentenced for up to two years’ imprisonment for possessing 4 ounces of marijuana. Here in New York, the 1973 Nelson Rockefeller anti-drug law provides for a mandatory prison sentence of 15 years to life for possession of 4 ounces of any illegal drug.
  • The passage in 13 states of the “three strikes” laws (life in prison after being convicted of three felonies), made it necessary to build 20 new federal prisons. One of the most disturbing cases resulting from this measure was that of a prisoner who for stealing a car and two bicycles received three 25-year sentences.
  • Longer sentences.
  • The passage of laws that require minimum sentencing, without regard for circumstances.
  • A large expansion of work by prisoners creating profits that motivate the incarceration of more people for longer periods of time.
  • More punishment of prisoners, so as to lengthen their sentences.
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26 minutes ago, Geneaut said:

It's a crying shame. I fully get the need to be 'tough' on crime, but at a certain point, it becomes counter-productive. 

Be tough, but at the same time don’t ruin a persons life unless violent crime is involved.  

  • The passage in 13 states of the “three strikes” laws (life in prison after being convicted of three felonies), made it necessary to build 20 new federal prisons. One of the most disturbing cases resulting from this measure was that of a prisoner who for stealing a car and two bicycles received three 25-year sentences.
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I've preached to some former NFL players in the prison Ministry..  All they do is work out,,,  one guy who was at The prison in Atmore Ala. looked like The incredible Hulk...  because that's all they do mostly...  Sad but some men had no parents to guide them in he right direction.

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54 minutes ago, Geneaut said:

It's a crying shame. I fully get the need to be 'tough' on crime, but at a certain point, it becomes counter-productive. 

It’s only a crime if some idiots in Washington decide they want to make it a crime. Think about that. 

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Just now, The Smart One said:

It’s only a crime if some idiots in Washington decide they want to make it a crime. Think about that. 

I agree.

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To put it in perspective - Black College Student Sentenced to 12 Years in Prison for Kissing a White Girl

http://www.blacknews.com/news/albert-wilson-black-student-sentenced-12-years-prison-kissing-white-girl/

Upshur County jury sentences Houston man to 80 years for drug charge

http://www.kltv.com/2018/11/14/upshur-county-jury-sentences-houston-man-years-drug-charge/

Unfortunately, these are not exceptional cases.

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2 hours ago, Drunken Minotaur Zebra said:

It’s disgusting. Systemic racism in action (but white people get screwed by our “Justice” system too...).

 

31 minutes ago, FinalScore2.0 said:

To put it in perspective - Black College Student Sentenced to 12 Years in Prison for Kissing a White Girl

http://www.blacknews.com/news/albert-wilson-black-student-sentenced-12-years-prison-kissing-white-girl/

Upshur County jury sentences Houston man to 80 years for drug charge

http://www.kltv.com/2018/11/14/upshur-county-jury-sentences-houston-man-years-drug-charge/

Unfortunately, these are not exceptional cases.

Not to get off topic but sometimes I think society would have been much better off if we were all born the same skin color.

With that said they probably just said 12 years to scare him. He'll probably be out in 1-2 years.

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Posted (edited)

13 minutes ago, Falcons Fan MVP said:

 

Not to get off topic but sometimes I think society would have been much better off if we were all born the same skin color.

With that said they probably just said 12 years to scare him. He'll probably be out in 1-2 years.

Not really. The society is built around predatory capitalism. A small group have most of the wealth and everyone else fight for scraps. Race is the preferred manner of keeping the underclass divided. See the laws created after Bacon's revolt to give privileges to whites over non whites. Before that British Common Law applied to all people.

Also consider the U.S. has

the most expensive health care system

most expensive education system

most expensive war agency (defense)

most expensive political elections (pay to play)

It's all about creating a feudal system and it's working very well

 

Edited by FinalScore2.0

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4 hours ago, Falconsin2012 said:

You can kill someone and do less time.  Clear abuse of judicial discretion

While I don’t condone his behavior, 3 years is plenty if nobody was hurt.  This is why the “home of the free” has twice as many people incarcerated as any other country.  Prison is now big business

United States constitutes 4.4% of the worlds population but houses 22% of the worlds prisoners

The most alarming stat: approximately $80 billion is still spent each year on corrections facilities alone, according to a Prison Policy Initiative report, dwarfing the $68 billion discretionary budget of the Department of Education.

Yep. Welcome to crony capitalism, where every government function is up for sale to the highest bidder.

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Yep this is BS, people get less for flat our 1st degree murder.

Conservatives THIS is why a lot of people don't like you cause you support this type fo crap and blow off systemic racism like this as no big deal when we know you do this by design.

Bunchy Carter likes this

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16 minutes ago, MAD597 said:

Yep this is BS, people get less for flat our 1st degree murder.

Conservatives THIS is why a lot of people don't like you cause you support this type fo crap and blow off systemic racism like this as no big deal when we know you do this by design.

I mean, here is the statute for Voluntary Manslaughter.  This dude is getting 11 years for a non-violent crime...smh

Voluntary Manslaughter Maximum of 10 years, up to 5 with no parole
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5 hours ago, Falconsin2012 said:

You can kill someone and do less time.  Clear abuse of judicial discretion

While I don’t condone his behavior, 3 years is plenty if nobody was hurt.  This is why the “home of the free” has twice as many people incarcerated as any other country.  Prison is now big business

United States constitutes 4.4% of the worlds population but houses 22% of the worlds prisoners

The most alarming stat: approximately $80 billion is still spent each year on corrections facilities alone, according to a Prison Policy Initiative report, dwarfing the $68 billion discretionary budget of the Department of Education.

Tell you what per capita NZ and Maori are right up there right in those incarceration stats.At last count Maori with in NZ prisons make up 51% of that population it’s shocking down this part of the world.

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