vitaman

NFL Requirement

31 posts in this topic

After listening to Sean McVay take full blame for losing the game, I realized I have heard this before.

DQ says basically the same thing after every loss. It gets boring. It feels disingenuous. 

Is it just that if they tell the truth of players staying out too late or missing assignments, no free agents will want to play for them? Or is it something the NFL as a league requests of them?

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Are you saying Goff having nobody to throw to all game wasn't at all the fault of the guy calling the plays? McVay's their OC and they scored 3 points.

PokerSteve likes this

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51 minutes ago, Smiler11 said:

Good leaders own failure, bad leaders deflect it and look for excuses/scapegoats.

Exactly.  

The head coach is responsible for the coaching staff and team as well as the product on the field. Publicly throwing people under the bus, in most cases, shows weakness in my opinion.  If someone needs to be corrected, fails, etc have a conversation with them.  Don't go to the media and tell everyone. 

That, in many cases, just breaks down trust.  

 

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I'll echo what others have already said.  That is the sign of a good leader.  I have been in management/leadership roles most of my professional life and you just have to take responsibility for any failures that happen beneath you and give the successes to them as well.  More often than not, the failures wont actually be your fault, but you are responsible for your employees so you own it and move on. 

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If you listened to Sean Paytons press conference after the NFCCG you should know that it's not required.

You have a young QB who just had his worst game in the biggest game of his career. McVay taking the blame pulls pressure off his QB who doesn't need anymore pressure right now. 

Flying Falcon likes this

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I can assure you if there were any issues needed to be addressed with the team they would not be done in front of the cameras immediately after the Super Bowl. Not only is it important to wait a significant amount of time before you deep dive into those problems, but involving anybody external is a great way to have your star players ask for trades like LeVeon and AB. 

Francis York Morgan likes this

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Rules...Rule one. Take responsibility for actions of the personnel under you. Rule 2. Praise in front of EVERYBODY....Chastise in private. This in private thing can be in the training field during practice where only the team is there available to accept that they did wrong or a learning environment. If you do something wrong....take responsibility for it. Oh and if you are an OC...dont throw Lockette under the bus. 

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9 minutes ago, Stryka said:

Standard Coach Speak.

He went with the accepted "it was all on me" speech and I respect that...

However, he could have broken out of the standard mold and gone for immortality, like John McKay when asked about his team's execution. The whole world knows Mckay's reply ~ "I'm in favor of it."

He could've brought down the presser if he'd started out, "I know now that in the early days of Super Bowl week our team was being watched closely by an intelligence far greater than mine. Across an immense cerebral gulf a mind that is to my mind as mine is to the beasts in the jungle; intellectually vast, cool and unsympathetic regarding our team and our Lombardi hopes, slowly and surely drew his plans against us..." :lol:

 

 

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The worst leaders in the world blame everyone else. That's the part that sucks about leadership. You have to give all the credit to those under you when you are successful, and take all the blame when things go wrong. 

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1 hour ago, PokerSteve said:

He went with the accepted "it was all on me" speech and I respect that...

However, he could have broken out of the standard mold and gone for immortality, like John McKay when asked about his team's execution. The whole world knows Mckay's reply ~ "I'm in favor of it."

He could've brought down the presser if he'd started out, "I know now that in the early days of Super Bowl week our team was being watched closely by an intelligence far greater than mine. Across an immense cerebral gulf a mind that is to my mind as mine is to the beasts in the jungle; intellectually vast, cool and unsympathetic regarding our team and our Lombardi hopes, slowly and surely drew his plans against us..." :lol:

 

 

Lmao.....Yea I would like to see them be more transparent.  Not saying you need to call out players or coaches but be frank. 

PokerSteve and vitaman like this

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While it would be nice to hear truth, the truth would crush so many.

 

Example:  Tell our defense they gased out, and you wouldn't see some of them back.  When it's actually your fault for not building up their stamina.  

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4 hours ago, Godzilla1985 said:

Anytime someone screws up that are under my supervision I take full responsibility.  Goes with the territory. 

Yup, give all the credit, take all the blame.  I am 100% from the school of Sun Tzu.  Failure of a team or group of sub-ordinates lies squarely on the leadership, period.  If your talent is bad, you should have gotten better talent.  You have what you have, give them the tools to be successful and support them in all efforts.  If they succeed it's because they work hard, if they fail it's because you screwed up.

Godzilla1985 likes this

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And in case you never read Sun Tzu, I suggest you do and don't take it overly literal.  Easter philosophy is based on a lot of imagery.  The story of the concubines is the perfect example of good coaching (just don't take it literal).  If you haven't ever read it, here is a summary of the story of the concubines:

Sun Tzu was a Chinese general in the period of the Warring States around 400 BC. At that time across China, local warlords constantly waged war against one another to fight for their shares of the remnants of the collapsed Chou Empire. Sun Tzu was being challenged by a warlord to apply his famous war doctrine to train 180 women from the warlord’s palace into an orderly company. Among the women, two were the warlord’s favourite concubines. Sun Tzu divided the women into two groups and put a concubine in command of each.

Sun Tzu then set the women a simple drill and made sure they understood what to do. However, when he started ordering them to perform the drill, the women burst out in laughter. He tried again with the same result. Sun Tzu claimed that this failure of the troops to obey was the fault of the commanders. So, despite the warlord’s pleas, he ordered the two concubines beheaded as an example for the rest of the company. Thereafter, the women did not utter a single sound and performed the drill exactly as commanded.

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