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Falconsin2012

Elite Dependability Vs Elite Talent

53 posts in this topic

I’m always fascinated with Belichick’s ability to build a roster that emphasizes scheme fit over elite talent.  His ability to identify & exploit every players weakness.  Peyton Manning recently said that Belichick  “dismantles player weaknesses like tinker toys.” Manning has tried to quiz him about various great players he has faced.

“What I came away with is that he’s not that impressed with anybody,” Manning says. “I remember telling my dad once, ‘I hope nobody ever asks Bill about me because I don’t want to hear what he says.’ “

 

Anyways, I just read this article and instead of blowing our load on “elite” talent, would rather we focus on dependable scheme fits.  Below is the article I’m referencing:

 

Bill Belichick explains the No. 1 secret to the Patriots' success in fascinating interview

Bill Belichick is the undisputed master. The best coach in the history of the NFL. The evil genius of the league. No where else in sports is there a man so meticulously well-prepared, so flawless in his execution, and so adept in his innovation.

There are so many interesting things to come out of CNBC’s latest interview, but the most fascinating was his repeated prioritization of “dependability” over “talent”.

A selection from the interview:

“There have been times when I’ve put too much responsibility on people. … They might have been the most talented, or the people you hoped would do the right or best thing, and they didn’t come through,” Belichick says.

Big mistake.

When it comes to getting things done, especially critical things, forget the high flyers: “You have to go with the person who you have the most confidence in, the most consistent,” Belichick says. “And if it doesn’t work, it doesn’t work, but I’m going down with that person.”

It’s interesting, because it marks such a departure than the norm in professional sports nowadays, which places such a premium on talent. Indeed, it seems to defy some of Belichik’s own past actions. This is the coach, after all, who signed Randy Moss, and who gave temperamental talents like Chad Johnson and Albert Haynesworth tryouts.

But again, Belichick isn’t saying that talent is bad, or that he doesn’t want ultra-talented players — only a fool would say that. Of course you want to stack your team with as much talent as possible. What he’s saying is that when push comes to shove, if had to choose which quality is more important, he’d choose elite dependability over elite skill.

usp_nfl__pittsburgh_steelers_at_new_engl

Mark L. Baer-USA TODAY Sports

Suddenly, his gravitation towards unspectacular talents throughout his career makes sense. Guys like LeGarrette Blount, Danny Amendola and Julian Edelman — good-but-not-great talents that are extremely consistent — appeal because they can offer Belichick that baseline level of output he can take to the bank every week.

It’s the same reason why he can squeeze out 10 wins out of a guy like Matt Cassel: He’s looking for cogs in the machine that won’t fail, the same way you would a car, because if he keeps the system running, that’s infinitely harder to beat than any one talent.”

Edited by Falconsin2012

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But again, how many H.C are outhere like B.B or scouting personnels matter of fact?

Who can keep a system running at such high level.....thats a major issue with ball clubs like Atlanta Falcons.

NO CONSISTENCY at coaching level in past 10 years.

NO CONSISTENCY at scouting level in past 10 years...picked elite talent but unable to bring a championship unit to perform at high level.

STATUS QUO = accepted mediocre special teams and trenches sub par play year after year and heavily invested in individuals.

The painful thing is this ball club has right people but, there's something lacking which prevents our ball club to reach the ultimate heights of Lombardi.

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People want us to have a Patriot-like view when it comes to the roster, but nobody wants us to make the BB decisions when it comes to cutting ties w/ players. People want to continue paying out the *** for skill position guys and wonder why we cant solidify our trenches.

Edited by RubberDucky

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1 hour ago, RubberDucky said:

People want us to have a Patriot-like view when it comes to the roster, but nobody wants us to make the BB decisions when it comes to cutting ties w/ players. People want to continue paying out the *** for skill position guys and wonder why we cant solidify our trenches.

Therein lies the rub.  A Belichick move is to draft Oliver and let Grady  hit FA.

Edited by Falconsin2012
Vandy, 28-3, JDaveG and 1 other like this

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51 minutes ago, Falconsin2012 said:

I’m always fascinated with Belichick’s ability to build a roster that emphasizes scheme fit over elite talent.  His ability to identify & exploit every players weakness.  Peyton Manning recently said that Belichick  “dismantles player weaknesses like tinker toys.” Manning has tried to quiz him about various great players he has faced.

“What I came away with is that he’s not that impressed with anybody,” Manning says. “I remember telling my dad once, ‘I hope nobody ever asks Bill about me because I don’t want to hear what he says.’ “

 

Anyways, I just read this article and instead of blowing our load on “elite” talent, would rather we focus on dependable scheme fits.  Below is the article I’m referencing:

 

Bill Belichick explains the No. 1 secret to the Patriots' success in fascinating interview

Bill Belichick is the undisputed master. The best coach in the history of the NFL. The evil genius of the league. No where else in sports is there a man so meticulously well-prepared, so flawless in his execution, and so adept in his innovation.

There are so many interesting things to come out of CNBC’s latest interview, but the most fascinating was his repeated prioritization of “dependability” over “talent”.

A selection from the interview:

“There have been times when I’ve put too much responsibility on people. … They might have been the most talented, or the people you hoped would do the right or best thing, and they didn’t come through,” Belichick says.

Big mistake.

When it comes to getting things done, especially critical things, forget the high flyers: “You have to go with the person who you have the most confidence in, the most consistent,” Belichick says. “And if it doesn’t work, it doesn’t work, but I’m going down with that person.”

It’s interesting, because it marks such a departure than the norm in professional sports nowadays, which places such a premium on talent. Indeed, it seems to defy some of Belichik’s own past actions. This is the coach, after all, who signed Randy Moss, and who gave temperamental talents like Chad Johnson and Albert Haynesworth tryouts.

But again, Belichick isn’t saying that talent is bad, or that he doesn’t want ultra-talented players — only a fool would say that. Of course you want to stack your team with as much talent as possible. What he’s saying is that when push comes to shove, if had to choose which quality is more important, he’d choose elite dependability over elite skill.

usp_nfl__pittsburgh_steelers_at_new_engl

Mark L. Baer-USA TODAY Sports

Suddenly, his gravitation towards unspectacular talents throughout his career makes sense. Guys like LeGarrette Blount, Danny Amendola and Julian Edelman — good-but-not-great talents that are extremely consistent — appeal because they can offer Belichick that baseline level of output he can take to the bank every week.

It’s the same reason why he can squeeze out 10 wins out of a guy like Matt Cassel: He’s looking for cogs in the machine that won’t fail, the same way you would a car, because if he keeps the system running, that’s infinitely harder to beat than any one talent.”

He is a perfect coach like saban, did you see UGA's pro day he ran the drills last year , he has his hands on everything 

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13 minutes ago, mattyicefalcon said:

But again, how many H.C are outhere like B.B or scouting personnels matter of fact?

Who can keep a system running at such high level.....thats a major issue with ball clubs like Atlanta Falcons.

NO CONSISTENCY at coaching level in past 10 years.

NO CONSISTENCY at scouting level in past 10 years...picked elite talent but unable to bring a championship unit to perform at high level.

STATUS QUO = accepted mediocre special teams and trenches sub par play year after year and heavily invested in individuals.

The painful thing is this ball club has right people but, there's something lacking which prevents our ball club to reach the ultimate heights of Lombardi.

Belichick’s dad on Gameplan

“Get as much usable information as can be utilized to either (1) help formulate game plans, or (2) better prepare various individual players to either combat the strength, or take advantage of the weaknesses of an individual or opposing team. It appears that if any information obtained does not fall into one of those two categories, then it is useless.”

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1 minute ago, Brewcrew said:

I wonder how tarnished N.E. legacy is if the Seahawks run for the TD and Atlanta runs and kicks the FG.   Can’t change the past, but just wonder.

Or go back even further......the "tuck rule" that got the pays into the Superbowl the first time .....aka the fumble that was not called

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1 minute ago, Sicairos said:

If BB ever left New England and was open to joining another team, how much would he get paid :ninja:

As much as he wants.........just don't give him a napkin

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37 minutes ago, Falconsin2012 said:

It helps some...but doesn’t help them win the SB.  

They wouldn't be near what they are if SEA and ATL didn't **** themselves. 

4 (5?) SB loses in a row.

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7 minutes ago, Brewcrew said:

I wonder how tarnished N.E. legacy is if the Seahawks run for the TD and Atlanta runs and kicks the FG.   Can’t change the past, but just wonder.

Ultimately, those 2 examples only further solidify his legacy. Before SB 49 he was already considered by most to be the best.  Now it’s not even a debate.  

Watch the preparation put forth the final walk through before SB 49.  Look closely at the play they defend against on the goal line.  BB didn’t call TO t the end bc he knew his preparation was better

Start watching at the 3 minute mark:

 

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7 minutes ago, Malachore said:

They wouldn't be near what they are if SEA and ATL didn't **** themselves. 

4 (5?) SB loses in a row.

SB 49 was about preparation.  Belichick prepared his players to win the rep on the Butler INT.  Seriously, watch the video I posted above.  

Edited by Falconsin2012

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1 minute ago, Falconsin2012 said:

SB 49 was about preparation.  Belichick prepared his players to win the rep on the Butler INT.  Seriously, watch the video I posted above.  

That prep wouldn't have matter if SEA would have just done what they should have done.

NE has been every bit as lucky if not more lucky than good. Like I said, should have been 5 in a row and have still lost 3 of last 5.

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3 minutes ago, Malachore said:

That prep wouldn't have matter if SEA would have just done what they should have done.

NE has been every bit as lucky if not more lucky than good. Like I said, should have been 5 in a row and have still lost 3 of last 5.

NE forced Seattle to play that rep on their terms.  For those who argue that Seahawks should have run the ball, where would you have liked them to run it? There are eight defenders in the box against six blockers, and they have leverage based on alignment against a possible inside zone from shotgun.

Here’s what Wilson saw at the time. There’s nowhere to run.

(Defenders circled in yellow are in man coverage.)

Screen_Shot_2018_06_04_at_3.17.02_PM.png

Passing the ball was the best option in this situation. Against man coverage, a pick play was a sound choice.

There is a fair argument to be made that Seattle could have called a different pass play, to one of its more experienced options. However, given this pre-snap look, Wilson had to expect possible zero coverage, where everyone who’s not guarding an offensive player in a route is rushing the passer. That doesn’t leave much time for much of a route concept. This play, in theory, is a great press man coverage beater.

Defense just won the rep 

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3 hours ago, Falconsin2012 said:

Ultimately, those 2 examples only further solidify his legacy. Before SB 49 he was already considered by most to be the best.  Now it’s not even a debate.  

Watch the preparation put forth the final walk through before SB 49.  Look closely at the play they defend against on the goal line.  BB didn’t call TO t the end bc he knew his preparation was better

Start watching at the 3 minute mark:

 

BB sold his soul for Dem ring.....I see it no other way.

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3 hours ago, Falconsin2012 said:

NE forced Seattle to play that rep on their terms.  For those who argue that Seahawks should have run the ball, where would you have liked them to run it? There are eight defenders in the box against six blockers, and they have leverage based on alignment against a possible inside zone from shotgun.

Here’s what Wilson saw at the time. There’s nowhere to run.

(Defenders circled in yellow are in man coverage.)

Screen_Shot_2018_06_04_at_3.17.02_PM.png

Passing the ball was the best option in this situation. Against man coverage, a pick play was a sound choice.

There is a fair argument to be made that Seattle could have called a different pass play, to one of its more experienced options. However, given this pre-snap look, Wilson had to expect possible zero coverage, where everyone who’s not guarding an offensive player in a route is rushing the passer. That doesn’t leave much time for much of a route concept. This play, in theory, is a great press man coverage beater.

Defense just won the rep 

I'm going to trust that the best power back in the league can get me 1 yard.

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9 hours ago, RubberDucky said:

People want us to have a Patriot-like view when it comes to the roster, but nobody wants us to make the BB decisions when it comes to cutting ties w/ players. People want to continue paying out the *** for skill position guys and wonder why we cant solidify our trenches.

This. Rosters must churn yearly

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