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Hawks October game thread

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2 hours ago, JerseyNo12 said:

Lol at everyone who thought this kid was a Steph Curry wannabe and had bust written all over him because of his size. Trae is a playmaker. You can't teach the things he does--what he sees.

He's a better passer than Curry IMO. His vision is off the charts 

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Things I liked (besides the obvious):

 Trae's 1 Turnover

Huerter's 10 rebounds and 4 assists (I had no clue he was such a good rebounder and passer). His defense wasn't bad either.

What a homecoming for Spellman

Len finally with double digit rebounds.

Bembry making 3 of 4 from 3.

I loved that ALL 3 of our rookies played really well in our 1st Win. What a memory for them.

GO HAWKS!!!

 

 

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love how loyd got that high screen for young all night, kevin should play a ton he is a hustler fellas the picks are looking good

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10 hours ago, jayu70 said:

Things I liked (besides the obvious):

 Trae's 1 Turnover

Huerter's 10 rebounds and 4 assists (I had no clue he was such a good rebounder and passer). His defense wasn't bad either.

What a homecoming for Spellman

Len finally with double digit rebounds.

Bembry making 3 of 4 from 3.

I loved that ALL 3 of our rookies played really well in our 1st Win. What a memory for them.

GO HAWKS!!!

 

 

huerters hustle game is amazing loved the offensive boards especially on that one position he also looks taller than 6-6 6-7

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14 hours ago, JerseyNo12 said:

Well you're gonna be mad if you're expecting a lot of wins from this squad.

not mad but dissapointed grown men should compete and they did last night 

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12 hours ago, tl;dr said:

He's a better passer than Curry IMO. His vision is off the charts 

That dime to Spellman in the lane still floors me. It's like one of those Ryan to Julio connections in which Ryan threw the ball before Julio even made his break but he knew Julio would be there and the defender can't do anything about it.

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12 hours ago, jayu70 said:

Things I liked (besides the obvious):

 Trae's 1 Turnover

Huerter's 10 rebounds and 4 assists (I had no clue he was such a good rebounder and passer). His defense wasn't bad either.

What a homecoming for Spellman

Len finally with double digit rebounds.

Bembry making 3 of 4 from 3.

I loved that ALL 3 of our rookies played really well in our 1st Win. What a memory for them.

GO HAWKS!!!

 

 

Len at the very least is solid depth. He can be a little undisciplined at times but he's physical and can stretch the floor. Also showed a nice post move to spin past Thompson for the jam.

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22 minutes ago, JerseyNo12 said:

That dime to Spellman in the lane still floors me. It's like one of those Ryan to Julio connections in which Ryan threw the ball before Julio even made his break but he knew Julio would be there and the defender can't do anything about it.

But, Trae's pass had a lot more zip on it.  If only Ryan had an arm like that!

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Good article on the owner

 

Schultz: Tony Ressler has learned from mistakes, says he was ‘schmuck in the room’ for two years

USATSI_8887804-1024x706.jpg
By Jeff Schultz 2h agocomment-icon@2x.png save-icon@2x.png

It’s not uncommon for someone to accrue millions or billions of dollars in the business world, decide to purchase a pro sports franchise as a sort of fun diversion, then fail spectacularly, like a Lego champion who expected to seamlessly blend into an aerospace laboratory.

Owning a sports team doesn’t require any unique brilliance, but having expertise in real estate, retail or operating private equity firms means bupkis in the world of bats, balls and, “What? You signed Dwight Howard?”

Which brings me to Hawks owner Tony Ressler. If there is one reason to feel good about the franchise’s future, it’s him. That’s bound to get lost at some point because the Hawks finished 24-58 last season and are not expected to be any good this season (notwithstanding their win Sunday in Cleveland). Ressler has significantly moved the franchise forward in several ways the past year, and equally important, he acknowledges his early missteps put the franchise in a dreadful hole.

“Let’s cut the ******** — I didn’t know what I was doing,” Ressler said. “I can blame someone else, I can blame you, I can blame my wife. But there was only one schmuck in the room, and that was me.”

Ressler purchased the Hawks in April of 2015, as a 60-win Atlanta team was beginning the playoffs. Former general manager Danny Ferry was in purgatory at the time, and the basketball operations were being run by Mike Budenholzer, the NBA’s coach of the year, and assistant general manager Wes Wilcox. Ressler did the easy and seemingly most logical thing after the playoffs: He cut ties with the polarizing Ferry, promoted Budenholzer to team president and elevated Wilcox.

Boom goes the dynamite.

“It was a recipe for disaster,” he said. “Total dysfunction.”

Budenholzer and Wilcox constantly disagreed on direction and personnel decisions. They signed Dwight Howard. They let Al Horford walk. Budenholzer was determined to try to win today but was totally lost as a big picture guy. Wilcox had player personnel skills but lacked the temperament to lead people. The Hawks went from reaching the Eastern Conference Finals to exiting the playoffs in the second round a year later, then the first round a year after that.

Ressler correctly decided to remove Budenholzer as team president in 2017 and hired general manager Travis Schlenk. Budenholzer convinced Ressler, and maybe himself, that he would be satisfied to be just a coach again. He lied to both Ressler and himself. Budenholzer asked out after the season, then said no to a job in Phoenix that he was offered.

Ressler and Schlenk fumed as the saga played out publicly while the Hawks were trying to acquire trade compensation for their lame duck coach. Budenholzer eventually went to Milwaukee for nothing. The Hawks signed former Philadelphia assistant Lloyd Pierce as their new coach. But last year was a wasted year in the rebuild from a developmental standpoint, and that’s on Budenholzer.

Ressler said he wasn’t surprised by Budeholzer’s decision at the end, nor will he speculate as to his state of mind during the season.

“Bud was not the right coach for us,” he said. “He was desperate to coach a superstar. I don’t know where Bud’s head was; you’ll have to ask him. But I do think when some people have a very short life as the decision-maker, and they no longer have it, sometimes they miss it. I know this: Getting a Lloyd Pierce, a coach with his attributes who works hard and wants to help young guys get better, is exactly what I wanted and exactly what Travis wanted.”

Ressler hasn’t done many interviews. He never had to in private business. But he has come to understand the sports world is different, and he believes at some level one can’t move forward without acknowledging lessons learned from the past.

“For two years, I was a deer in the headlights,” he said. “It’s like the story of a poker game when you’re looking around, and you wonder who the fish is. If you don’t know the answer, it’s probably you. I don’t want to blame somebody else because I was the schmuck ,and I didn’t have to do it. I realized the mistake the minute after I did it.”

I will go easier on Ressler than he will on himself. He was in charge, but he trusted the people he put in place. True bad sports ownership isn’t when someone is trying to compete and do the right thing. Bad sports ownership is when winning isn’t the priority but stock price is, when someone would rather satisfy their own ego than accept input from those with actual knowledge in the sport.

We’ve seen bad ownership in Atlanta. It’s not Tony Ressler.

He pushed for a long-overdue practice facility and got it built. He purchased a developmental G-League franchise. Most recently, he spearheaded a $200 million makeover of the arena formerly known as Philips (now State Farm). The Hawks now have arguably the NBA’s nicest venue, complete with expanded and open concourses that one can actually walk around now, multiple viewing areas, a massive new scoreboard and video boards, three private clubs, attractive redesigned suites, two corner suites with golf simulators (why not?) and a barber shop (OK, a bit much).

These are not small achievements. The arena makeover includes $142.5 million in public money, and we can debate whether tax dollars ever should fund a sport’s team stadium or arena without taxpayer approval. But the Hawks actually stayed in their own building, unlike the Braves or Falcons, and received far less help than either of the other two franchises.

His next quest is to get the public and city officials to invest in a $1.75 billion development of, “The Gulch,” the downtown eyesore that sits adjacent to the arena.

He calls the sunken area, “a useless hole in the ground, unless you’re a train.”

But Ressler has fixed what he can for now. There is peace in basketball ops, and he’s staying out of the way. He also scoffs at rumors that he was the reason the Hawks traded the third overall draft pick, Luka Doncic, to Dallas, for fifth pick Trae Young and the Mavericks’ first-rounder next year. The rumor goes that Ressler believed Young would be easier to market to fans.

But Ressler said the trade only happened because “basketball operations feels like they have a kid who’s going to be really good with a really high ceiling, and we got a great first-round pick next year. If the rumor is that I picked Trae over Doncic because of marketing, it’s the dumbest ******* thing I can imagine. It’s fundamentally untrue.”

The Hawks (1-2) won Sunday night in Cleveland. Young led them with 35 points and 11 assists. So, yeah.

This won’t be a beautiful season. Many project the team to finish with the NBA’s worst record. It is the ultimate long shot. So I posed a question to Ressler: If I had $10 to burn, should I buy lottery tickets or put it on the Hawks to win the title in Las Vegas.

Ressler hesitated before answering: “Hmm. I think I would buy two beers here on opening night, because we have $5 beers now, and I would say you’re spending your money more effectively. But if you have a few years in that bet, I would take the Hawks.”

(Photo of Tony Ressler: Jason Getz-USA TODAY Sports

Edited by oztin

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4 hours ago, oztin said:

Good article on the owner

 

Schultz: Tony Ressler has learned from mistakes, says he was ‘schmuck in the room’ for two years

USATSI_8887804-1024x706.jpg
By Jeff Schultz 2h agocomment-icon@2x.png save-icon@2x.png

It’s not uncommon for someone to accrue millions or billions of dollars in the business world, decide to purchase a pro sports franchise as a sort of fun diversion, then fail spectacularly, like a Lego champion who expected to seamlessly blend into an aerospace laboratory.

Owning a sports team doesn’t require any unique brilliance, but having expertise in real estate, retail or operating private equity firms means bupkis in the world of bats, balls and, “What? You signed Dwight Howard?”

Which brings me to Hawks owner Tony Ressler. If there is one reason to feel good about the franchise’s future, it’s him. That’s bound to get lost at some point because the Hawks finished 24-58 last season and are not expected to be any good this season (notwithstanding their win Sunday in Cleveland). Ressler has significantly moved the franchise forward in several ways the past year, and equally important, he acknowledges his early missteps put the franchise in a dreadful hole.

“Let’s cut the ******** — I didn’t know what I was doing,” Ressler said. “I can blame someone else, I can blame you, I can blame my wife. But there was only one schmuck in the room, and that was me.”

Ressler purchased the Hawks in April of 2015, as a 60-win Atlanta team was beginning the playoffs. Former general manager Danny Ferry was in purgatory at the time, and the basketball operations were being run by Mike Budenholzer, the NBA’s coach of the year, and assistant general manager Wes Wilcox. Ressler did the easy and seemingly most logical thing after the playoffs: He cut ties with the polarizing Ferry, promoted Budenholzer to team president and elevated Wilcox.

Boom goes the dynamite.

“It was a recipe for disaster,” he said. “Total dysfunction.”

Budenholzer and Wilcox constantly disagreed on direction and personnel decisions. They signed Dwight Howard. They let Al Horford walk. Budenholzer was determined to try to win today but was totally lost as a big picture guy. Wilcox had player personnel skills but lacked the temperament to lead people. The Hawks went from reaching the Eastern Conference Finals to exiting the playoffs in the second round a year later, then the first round a year after that.

Ressler correctly decided to remove Budenholzer as team president in 2017 and hired general manager Travis Schlenk. Budenholzer convinced Ressler, and maybe himself, that he would be satisfied to be just a coach again. He lied to both Ressler and himself. Budenholzer asked out after the season, then said no to a job in Phoenix that he was offered.

Ressler and Schlenk fumed as the saga played out publicly while the Hawks were trying to acquire trade compensation for their lame duck coach. Budenholzer eventually went to Milwaukee for nothing. The Hawks signed former Philadelphia assistant Lloyd Pierce as their new coach. But last year was a wasted year in the rebuild from a developmental standpoint, and that’s on Budenholzer.

Ressler said he wasn’t surprised by Budeholzer’s decision at the end, nor will he speculate as to his state of mind during the season.

“Bud was not the right coach for us,” he said. “He was desperate to coach a superstar. I don’t know where Bud’s head was; you’ll have to ask him. But I do think when some people have a very short life as the decision-maker, and they no longer have it, sometimes they miss it. I know this: Getting a Lloyd Pierce, a coach with his attributes who works hard and wants to help young guys get better, is exactly what I wanted and exactly what Travis wanted.”

Ressler hasn’t done many interviews. He never had to in private business. But he has come to understand the sports world is different, and he believes at some level one can’t move forward without acknowledging lessons learned from the past.

“For two years, I was a deer in the headlights,” he said. “It’s like the story of a poker game when you’re looking around, and you wonder who the fish is. If you don’t know the answer, it’s probably you. I don’t want to blame somebody else because I was the schmuck ,and I didn’t have to do it. I realized the mistake the minute after I did it.”

I will go easier on Ressler than he will on himself. He was in charge, but he trusted the people he put in place. True bad sports ownership isn’t when someone is trying to compete and do the right thing. Bad sports ownership is when winning isn’t the priority but stock price is, when someone would rather satisfy their own ego than accept input from those with actual knowledge in the sport.

We’ve seen bad ownership in Atlanta. It’s not Tony Ressler.

He pushed for a long-overdue practice facility and got it built. He purchased a developmental G-League franchise. Most recently, he spearheaded a $200 million makeover of the arena formerly known as Philips (now State Farm). The Hawks now have arguably the NBA’s nicest venue, complete with expanded and open concourses that one can actually walk around now, multiple viewing areas, a massive new scoreboard and video boards, three private clubs, attractive redesigned suites, two corner suites with golf simulators (why not?) and a barber shop (OK, a bit much).

These are not small achievements. The arena makeover includes $142.5 million in public money, and we can debate whether tax dollars ever should fund a sport’s team stadium or arena without taxpayer approval. But the Hawks actually stayed in their own building, unlike the Braves or Falcons, and received far less help than either of the other two franchises.

His next quest is to get the public and city officials to invest in a $1.75 billion development of, “The Gulch,” the downtown eyesore that sits adjacent to the arena.

He calls the sunken area, “a useless hole in the ground, unless you’re a train.”

But Ressler has fixed what he can for now. There is peace in basketball ops, and he’s staying out of the way. He also scoffs at rumors that he was the reason the Hawks traded the third overall draft pick, Luka Doncic, to Dallas, for fifth pick Trae Young and the Mavericks’ first-rounder next year. The rumor goes that Ressler believed Young would be easier to market to fans.

But Ressler said the trade only happened because “basketball operations feels like they have a kid who’s going to be really good with a really high ceiling, and we got a great first-round pick next year. If the rumor is that I picked Trae over Doncic because of marketing, it’s the dumbest ******* thing I can imagine. It’s fundamentally untrue.”

The Hawks (1-2) won Sunday night in Cleveland. Young led them with 35 points and 11 assists. So, yeah.

This won’t be a beautiful season. Many project the team to finish with the NBA’s worst record. It is the ultimate long shot. So I posed a question to Ressler: If I had $10 to burn, should I buy lottery tickets or put it on the Hawks to win the title in Las Vegas.

Ressler hesitated before answering: “Hmm. I think I would buy two beers here on opening night, because we have $5 beers now, and I would say you’re spending your money more effectively. But if you have a few years in that bet, I would take the Hawks.”

(Photo of Tony Ressler: Jason Getz-USA TODAY Sports

nice

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Injury Update On Anderson, Collins, Dedmon & Hamilton

 
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Atlanta Hawks 
Posted: Oct 23, 2018

Guard/forward Justin Anderson continues to progress in his rehabilitation from surgery on June 29th to address recurring tibial stress syndrome in his left leg. He has been cleared to return to modified live practice and his status will be updated as appropriate. 

Following re-examination, forward/center John Collins continues to progress in his rehabilitation from mild inflammation and soreness in his left ankle. Spot shooting has been introduced as part of his rehabilitation plan. He is listed as out, will be reviewed on Nov. 4 and an update will be provided at that time.

Center Dewayne Dedmon participated in his first full live practice with the team today following rehabilitation for an avulsion fracture in his left ankle. He will be re-assessed tomorrow and is currently listed as probable for tomorrow’s game vs. Dallas.

Guard/forward Daniel Hamilton returned to modified practice today following rehabilitation for a tear in his right rotator cuff. He is currently listed as out, and his status will be updated as appropriate.

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Really think this is an exciting time to be a Hawks fan.

Got a nice core of 3 young exciting players (Young, Prince, Collins) and other young players who have potential (Bembry, Dorsey, Huerter, and Spellman)

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25 minutes ago, tl;dr said:

Really think this is an exciting time to be a Hawks fan.

Got a nice core of 3 young exciting players (Young, Prince, Collins) and other young players who have potential (Bembry, Dorsey, Huerter, and Spellman)

without a doubt

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Hawks offering plenty of other options in new-look arena

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ATLANTA -- The Atlanta Hawks may not win a lot of games this season.

Not to worry.

There will be plenty of options other than basketball for fans after a nearly $200 million arena renovation.

Want to work on your swing?

Check out the golf suites.

Need a trim?

Yep, there's a barber shop.

"This arena is for every single fan in the city of Atlanta," said Brett Stefansson, the general manager who oversaw the project. "We wanted to touch every aspect of it and make it special and unique."

The Hawks will debut their newly renamed State Farm Arena on Wednesday night, hosting the Mavericks in a home opener that features two of the NBA's most touted rookies, Atlanta's Trae Young and Dallas' Luka Doncic.

But both teams are in the midst of massive rebuilding projects that will likely take years to pay off -- they posted matching 24-58 records a year ago and could be even worse this season -- so fans might be checking out some of the arena's new amenities.

There are all sorts of fancy food items, from chicken and beignets to lemon pepper wings to a signature Italian pizza. Grammy-winning country star Zac Brown has his own place, which includes Southern-style gourmet dishes crafted by his personal chef and music memorabilia.

There are also three ritzy courtside clubs -- including one which has a bar area shaped like the Hawks logo behind a basket, where fans can sip cocktails while they watch the game.

More budget-minded patrons can take advantage of a dozen discounted items such as $1 chips, $2 jumbo pretzels or a $4 bottomless bucket of popcorn, seizing on a popular trend that started next door at Mercedes-Benz Stadium, home of the NFL Falcons and Atlanta United soccer team.

But it's some of the other features that figure to draw much of the attention in the new-look arena.

Most notably, there is Killer Mike's Swag Shop, a partnership with the Atlanta-based rapper that includes a full-service barber shop with four chairs facing the court on the second level, allowing customers to keep up with the home team while getting a fresh cut.

Or, if the game gets out of hand, the Topgolf Swing Suites might be a welcome alternative. While fans won't be able strike actual golf balls onto the court, they can try their luck on the simulators.

Hawks guard Kent Bazemore, an avid golfer, plans to slip up there himself before a game.

"I'll be up there smacking it around soon," he said, breaking into a sly grin.

Stefansson said the designers were focused on "creating a lot of different and distinct destinations, things than fans want to go seek out and experience." Bazemore called it a sign of the times, given that fans have myriad entertainment options and ever-shrinking attention spans.

"It's all about the experience," he said.

The aesthetics didn't go overlooked, either.

Massive clear glass windows were installed, providing views of the surrounding downtown area. Numerous walls were knocked down, allowing those on the concourses from keep up with the game even when they venture from their seats.

"People actually communicating, meeting new people, standing on the concourse talking about the game, it just opens it up for that community feel that we're trying to push here in Atlanta," Bazemore said.

The project also drew its share of criticism over $142.5 million in public funding , which cleared the way for the second-biggest project of its type in NBA history. It was surpassed only by Madison Square Garden in New York, where a $1 billion upgrade was carried out over three offseason from 2011-13.

This renovation -- or "transformation," the preferred nomenclature of its supporters -- was largely carried out over the past two summer breaks, a frenzied job that allowed little room for dallying or delay. The most striking part of the project was the removal of the stacked suites on one side of the building formerly known as Philips Arena , which required the Hawks to play all of last season with a giant covering over that construction zone and reduced capacity to just over 16,000.

Even now, with much of the work complete, the arena will seat only about 16,500 for basketball, a drop of almost 3,000 seats from the original configuration when the arena opened in 1999.

But the Hawks have traditionally been one of the NBA's worst-drawing seats, so there wasn't much hesitation about cutting back capacity to allow for a major upgrade.

The first thing we knew needed to do was knock down that wall of suites. Take that premium area and redistribute it around the building a little more evenly," Stefansson said. "It creates a lot more balance in the building."

Many of the Atlanta players got their first look at their revamped home on Tuesday. After playing their first three games on the road, the Hawks practiced for nearly two hours on the newly installed court, beneath a massive new scoreboard and video screen.

They were impressed with the new surroundings, which includes a much larger locker room and training area.

So was first-year coach Lloyd Pierce.

"It's unbelievable what this looks like," he said, glancing around. "I can't even imagine once we get some people in here what it's going to feel like."

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1 minute ago, JerseyNo12 said:

Ugh, enough of these 40-point quarters.

I’ve already seen enough 40-point quarters and 70-point halves for one season, lol.

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It's not good Luka Doncic or whatever the Marevicks are doing, it's historically bad Hawks defense, and even against a bad Cavaliers team we were trailing by double digits for awhile because of our bad defense but Trae Young's historical performance kept us in the game and we eventually pulled away. 

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