falcndave

Duke Is a Complete Liability in Coverage

60 posts in this topic

12 hours ago, FalconJim said:


Looks like Alford and Trufant are the best of this bunch.  I can't help but wonder, though, how this compares with the league average of all other DBs....is it good, is it middlin', or is it bad?!?!  
Anyway, thanks for researching and sharing these stats with us!  


 


 

 

42 minutes ago, HaRdH3ad said:

When duke guards aj green, ab, micheal Thomas etc then this will make since 

Our scheme is the driver here. We invite short passes with the hope of limiting YAC and making tackles short of the chains. These numbers are far above the league average, however, aDOT (avg depth of target) is very low on these passes for the most part. The average gain on these completions is 9 yards, but the aDoT is under 5 yards. Atlanta, by scheme, allows a high completion percentage and attempts to limit big plays.  This is why all the anti-Poole posts last year were so much garbage. By scheme, our slot corner is instructed not to gamble and keep the play in front of him, close and tackle. Look at anyone who has played slot corner in Quinn's defense, they give up high completion % and low aDOT. 

Atlanta's completion % allowed on throws over 20 yards in the air is among the best in the league. 

This is why tackling is so important and why Duke is currently a liability. Allowing short completions is encouraged by scheme. Missing tackles is the death of us. 

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On ‎10‎/‎10‎/‎2018 at 8:37 PM, falcndave said:

I've actually read in about 12 threads over the last two weeks that he is improving...   That I why I went digging around. Bartu was literally better. That is saying something. 

can't take these people serious

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What I'd like to know is who's the position coach teaching the LBs, safeties and corners their coverage technique.  Whoever he is needs to be replaced. 

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duke is awful!  worrilou is 10x the player duke riley will ever be!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

i saw him make one tackle in the steeler game!  one!  one more than i had from my couch here in ringgold.

beasley had ZERO tackles--that's the same amount i had from my couch here in ringgold.

we've historically had some bad defenses--but from what i've seen the last 4 games--this years's d is the worst i've ever seen and i've been watching this team since 1972.

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4 hours ago, Vandy said:

Thanks but I'm looking for Doug Mallory.  He's the DB coach and is the one who should be teach all defenders coverage techniques--not just the DBs.  I don't know whose preference it was to teach our guys to watch the man vs. the ball but whoever it is needs to go.  First issue with this technique is how will our guys be able to make a play on the ball unless they're looking back for it.  Plus at the NFL level, polished receivers aren't going to give you any clues that the ball is coming.  This defense could improve its pass defense and interceptions if they were taught how to properly play the ball in man and zone coverage.  

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15 hours ago, Da_Truth said:

  I don't know whose preference it was to teach our guys to watch the man vs. the ball but whoever it is needs to go.  First issue with this technique is how will our guys be able to make a play on the ball unless they're looking back for it. 

That man would be Dan Quinn. It is the central element of his defense. The whole concept for those in man coverage is to not get beat deep, to allow catches in front of you, and to make the tackle. Stats show that aDOT is fairly low against the Falcons. The "3 deep" are the ones that should be ball focused. They are forcing the same shorter throws they forced last year.  They are striking out on the tackle part. 

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22 minutes ago, falcndave said:

That man would be Dan Quinn. It is the central element of his defense. The whole concept for those in man coverage is to not get beat deep, to allow catches in front of you, and to make the tackle. Stats show that aDOT is fairly low against the Falcons. The "3 deep" are the ones that should be ball focused. They are forcing the same shorter throws they forced last year.  They are striking out of the tackle part. 

In zone they're already facing the QB, but they play so soft they allow the opponent to catch the ball, make a move and tackle half the time.  

In man they should be high or in trail technique, but should always look back to make a play on the ball.  This way they can use their body to drive the receiver to the sidelines, give them a chance to intercept the ball (which they can't do watching the man), and won't get a flag for interference as long as they're making a play on the ball.  They don't take advantage of the NFL rules.  

Look at the way Seattle plays the exact zone and man defenses. Seattle is breaking on the ball before the throw or while the ball is in the air.  This doesn't allow the opponent to make a move and they tackle them at the point of contact.

Falcons players on the other hand watch balls completed, stand there and wait for the opponent to come to them; they don't attack the opponent.  It's almost like they're playing scared so they don't get beat, but end up getting beat most of the time anyway.

A lot of this goes back to coaching to make sure our guys aren't playing soft zone or man, look back for the ball, and attack the opponent while the ball is in the air.

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9 minutes ago, Da_Truth said:

In zone they're already facing the QB, but they play so soft they allow the opponent to catch the ball, make a move and tackle half the time.  

In man they should be high or in trail technique, but should always look back to make a play on the ball.  This way they can use their body to drive the receiver to the sidelines, give them a chance to intercept the ball (which they can't do watching the man), and won't get a flag for interference as long as they're making a play on the ball.  They don't take advantage of the NFL rules.  

Look at the way Seattle plays the exact zone and man defenses. Seattle is breaking on the ball before the throw or while the ball is in the air.  This doesn't allow the opponent to make a move and they tackle them at the point of contact.

Falcons players on the other hand watch balls completed, stand there and waits for the opponent to come to them; they don't attack the opponent.  It's almost like they're playing scared so they don't get beat, but end up getting beat most of the time anyway.

A lot of this goes back to coaching to make sure our guys aren't playing soft zone or man, look back for the ball, and attack the opponent while the ball is in the air.

If they are in trail, Dan will be telling them they lost watching film the next week. I thought  you were referring to man coverage. The way Atlanta plays man in the short and intermediate areas isn't far from a match-up zone as far as technique goes. 

Thanks for the time to write that up. Quality stuff!

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11 minutes ago, Da_Truth said:

 

Falcons players on the other hand watch balls completed, stand there and waits for the opponent to come to them; they don't attack the opponent.  It's almost like they're playing scared so they don't get beat, but end up getting beat most of the time anyway.

 

I made the same observation last week. If you look at the way Jones and Neal break on short throws, and compare that to Riley and whoever is at safety, it is like watching two different teams. Experience in the role and talent are obviously the primary factors. 

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