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Breaking: Julio not attending minicamp

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The effort to demonize people who think Julio is going about this wrong is actually hilarious. I kind of love this thread.

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2 minutes ago, Peyton said:

The effort to demonize people who think Julio is going about this wrong is actually hilarious. I kind of love this thread.

I don’t think anybody is demonizing anybody that at least has a legitimate argument. Julio maybe could’ve handled it better and I don’t see many ppl disagreeing with the way it’s being handled but the problem is ppl NOW all of a sudden thinking we can be great without him. That’s what ppl are arguing. Also they are arguing it’s not that big of a deal because it will get  handled. I’m other words simply calm the f*ck down is what everybody is saying. B*tching about it isn’t gonna make it resolve and quicker. And it will be resolved. Any good business practicing FO will handle all business issues. 

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2 hours ago, falconidae said:

It is bashing and it's not facts. Ryan has thrown for more passing yards than anyone else in their first ten years, only Marino and Peyton threw for more TDs first 10 years. Only Brady and Manning had more wins at 10 years. Ryan is top ten all time in  both completion % and INT %. Those numbers are impossible for the player you're describing.

It's not "impossible" when the NFL that Matt Ryan walked into is clearly a.....passing league. Also he's played with the best WR and Hall of Fame TE how many of those first 10 years? So he's not throwing to Nate Burleson or any other random WR.

The fact, again, is that bringing up Matt Ryan having inconsistent passes in the redzone, where Julio is supposed to get TD attempts, is nothing new. We all know this. 

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Just now, Peyton said:

The effort to demonize people who think Julio is going about this wrong is actually hilarious. I kind of love this thread.

I dont think people are demonizing the people that dont agree with how Julio is handling his business....its people's right to have a difference in opinion...

But the way that their doing it...is sickening...Ive seen people completely destroy this man and attack his character in a way that makes him sound like a criminal ....for what???

OVER HIS MONEY??

Hes been a team player and true professional since he's been here...and the moment he does something for him ..folks want to burn him at the stake...I think its sad..

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3 minutes ago, TheFatboi said:

I don’t think anybody is demonizing anybody that at least has a legitimate argument. Julio maybe could’ve handled it better and I don’t see many ppl disagreeing with the way it’s being handled but the problem is ppl NOW all of a sudden thinking we can be great without him. That’s what ppl are arguing. Also they are arguing it’s not that big of a deal because it will get  handled. I’m other words simply calm the f*ck down is what everybody is saying. B*tching about it isn’t gonna make it resolve and quicker. And it will be resolved. Any good business practicing FO will handle all business issues. 

If nobody cared that Julio was skipping the mandatory camp, how would that help Julio get more money?

I mean, in order for if to be effective, doesn't somebody have to care?

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1 minute ago, RING OF HONOR said:

I dont think people are demonizing the people that dont agree with how Julio is handling his business....its people's right to have a difference in opinion...

But the way that their doing it...is sickening...Ive seen people completely destroy this man and attack his character in a way that makes him sound like a criminal ....for what???

OVER HIS MONEY??

Hes been a team player and true professional since he's been here...and the moment he does something for him ..folks want to burn him at the stake...I think its sad..

Ok, I missed that.  It's 37 pages and I missed most of them between 2 and 30, so maybe there is some of that stuff in there.

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1 minute ago, Peyton said:

If nobody cared that Julio was skipping the mandatory camp, how would that help Julio get more money?

I mean, in order for if to be effective, doesn't somebody have to care?

Doesn’t matter what fans care about. The FO cares I can guarantee you THAT Peyton. That’s all that matters. What we argue about in a message board has no bearing to what is going on in the FO. Arthur Blank cares about his bottom line. And that is putting @sses in seats. Julio is a part of that bottom line because ppl PAY to see him play and merch with his number on it brings in a ton of money and he’s also one of the faces of the league. 

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1 minute ago, TheFatboi said:

Doesn’t matter what fans care about. The FO cares I can guarantee you THAT Peyton. That’s all that matters. What we argue about in a message board has no bearing to what is going on in the FO. Arthur Blank cares about his bottom line. And that is putting @sses in seats. Julio is a part of that bottom line because ppl PAY to see him play and merch with his number on it brings in a ton of money and he’s also one of the faces of the league. 

Ok you kind of slid into an argument for paying Julio, which was not where I was going with that, but you did acknowledge what I was getting at.  The Falcons front office does care that he's not at work. This is a situation. 

I'm not as certain as you are that the Falcons are just going to pay him more money.  We'll see.  But like it or not, this is going to be the main topic of conversation until training camp.

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2 minutes ago, Peyton said:

Ok you kind of slid into an argument for paying Julio, which was not where I was going with that, but you did acknowledge what I was getting at.  The Falcons front office does care that he's not at work. This is a situation. 

I'm not as certain as you are that the Falcons are just going to pay him more money.  We'll see.  But like it or not, this is going to be the main topic of conversation until training camp.

I didn’t slide into anything. I was simply replying to what I thought you were saying. That’s exactly what a holdout is supposed to do. They care that he’s not in camp of course. They also care about resolving the situation. Of course it’s gonna be the main topic of discussion because our best player isn’t in camp. And I didn’t say they will just PAY him more money. I said they will resolve the situation. Will money be involved? Absolutely. But it’s not about the money per se. It’s about RESOLVING the issue and getting back to the business of football. 

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Just now, TheFatboi said:

I didn’t slide into anything. I was simply replying to what I thought you were saying. That’s exactly what a holdout is supposed to do. They care that he’s not in camp of course. They also care about resolving the situation. Of course it’s gonna be the main topic of discussion because our best player isn’t in camp. And I didn’t say they will just PAY him more money. I said they will resolve the situation. Will money be involved? Absolutely. But it’s not about the money per se. It’s about RESOLVING the issue and getting back to the business of football. 

They might just tell him "we love you but we can't do anything with your contract this offseason.  Let us know when you decide what you are going to do".  That wouldn't leave Julio with any good options except returning to work.

The truth is....none of us know.  A player refusing to come to work when there is three years left on their contract is a completely new experience for the Falcons.  It's unprecedented.  We really have no idea what they are going to do.

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4 minutes ago, TheFatboi said:

I didn’t slide into anything. I was simply replying to what I thought you were saying. That’s exactly what a holdout is supposed to do. They care that he’s not in camp of course. They also care about resolving the situation. Of course it’s gonna be the main topic of discussion because our best player isn’t in camp. And I didn’t say they will just PAY him more money. I said they will resolve the situation. Will money be involved? Absolutely. But it’s not about the money per se. It’s about RESOLVING the issue and getting back to the business of football. 

lol...we been saying this for how many pages and now it's some revelation?

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4 minutes ago, athell said:

lol...we been saying this for how many pages and now it's some revelation?

Sometimes the horse ain’t dead but in a coma brother. You just gotta keep beating him til he wakes up lol. 

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6 minutes ago, Peyton said:

They might just tell him "we love you but we can't do anything with your contract this offseason.  Let us know when you decide what you are going to do".  That wouldn't leave Julio with any good options except returning to work.

The truth is....none of us know.  A player refusing to come to work when there is three years left on their contract is a completely new experience for the Falcons.  It's unprecedented.  We really have no idea what they are going to do.

I have an idea they’ll resolve the issue for the best player on the team and and one of the best in the nfl. 

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1 minute ago, TheFatboi said:

I have an idea they’ll resolve the issue for the best player on the team and and one of the best in the nfl. 

It's sticky. The Falcons have several young great players.  They have to be careful about the precedence they set.

Paul Allen gave Marshawn Lynch just the tiniest amount of money when he pulled this, and the next year they were dealing with the same thing from Kam Chancellor.  I guess they recognized their error and just shut the door on Kam. They knew they had to.

Will be interesting to see what they do.  I think it if this was an easy fix he'd been at work this week.

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1 minute ago, Peyton said:

It's sticky. The Falcons have several young great players.  They have to be careful about the precedence they set.

Paul Allen gave Marshawn Lynch just the tiniest amount of money when he pulled this, and the next year they were dealing with the same thing from Kam Chancellor.  I guess they recognized their error and just shut the door on Kam. They knew they had to.

Will be interesting to see what they do.  I think it if this was an easy fix he'd been at work this week.

Of course it’s sticky but the difference is lynch made them successful on offense because the offense went thru him like it does Julio for us. We see the difference if what their offense looks like lost Lynch.  Kam could be somewhat replaced as he’s not the center piece of their defense. Earl was. That’s like Neal trying a stunt like that because Julio did it. He couldn’t win that argument. SS’s as a whole don’t carry that kind of weight. Pass rushers do tho. CB’s do too. Top WR’s, RB’s, LT’s and QB’s do on offense. Lynch was a top 2/3 RB in the league at the time. Julio is the top 1/2 wr at this time. SS’s are always hitting and putting themselves in danger. The nature of that position just nullifies a lot of bargaining power. 

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Falcons record in games Julio had 100+ yards = 24-18 (.571)

Falcons record in games Julio had 1+ TDs = 27-11 (.711)

He only had TDs in two games last year. If we redo his contract maybe it should only be to add a TD incentive.

 

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7 minutes ago, FalconFanSince1970 said:

Falcons record in games Julio had 100+ yards = 22-16 (.561)

Falcons record in games Julio had 1+ TDs = 27-11 (.711)

He only had TDs in two games last year. If we redo his contract maybe it should only be to add a TD incentive.

 

If we did that FFS1970 Julio couldn't be the highest paid WR in football, he!! he wouldn't even be in the bottom third of salaries for WR's with his TD production...

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3 hours ago, RING OF HONOR said:

I dont think people are demonizing the people that dont agree with how Julio is handling his business....its people's right to have a difference in opinion...

But the way that their doing it...is sickening...Ive seen people completely destroy this man and attack his character in a way that makes him sound like a criminal ....for what???

OVER HIS MONEY??

Hes been a team player and true professional since he's been here...and the moment he does something for him ..folks want to burn him at the stake...I think its sad..

It is perfectly reasonable to question his character, over a low ball move like this. He has been a model professional to date, but that’s what makes this even more disappointing.

We have a home SB, a really good chance to win it, offensive issues from 2017 to iron out and a 1st round WR who could learn a lot (of good things) from Julio. Instead of contributing his part to try to earn that success, he chooses this moment to selfishly hold the team to ransom rather than honour a contract with 3 years left to run, under which he has already been paid a lot of guaranteed money in good faith by the team.

I’ve not seen anybody “destroy the man”, but in the circumstances - including his  sub-par TD numbers and our cap and roster situation - it is certainly not unreasonable to be questioning whether Julio is worth extra money, and what the future implications of giving in to those demand might be. The bottom line, is that every extra $ he gets, is a dollar less that we will have to re-sign guys like Matthews, Beasley, Tyco etc. It is likely that we wouldn’t have enough to pay everyone what they want, so difficult decisions will have to made. It makes sense to question how best to use our limited resources.

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5 hours ago, TheFatboi said:

I’m pro falcons and that’s where all this stuff gets confusing. To me I do see a lot of pro Julio anti Julio divide. It’s not that way for me. I want the team to win at the end of the day and Julio is a big part of us winning whether folks admit it or not. So as a TEAM they will work that out because I don’t care how much the anti or pissed at Julio crowd yells and screams the FO knows Julio’s value not only to the team but also to Matt Ryan. They’ll work This out and go on about the business of football. If I’m in the FO I’m trying to figure out how we can resolve this where both sides are happy and it doesn’t tie our hands. And that’s why this stuff doesn’t get resolved over night. I’m in a contract situation right now and this is going on 3 weeks. I’m not upset because I know it’ll get done but then again I’ve been signing contracts and paperwork for over 17 years. I understand business. 

That’s it in a nutshell.

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Good article on Julio’s contract with options from over the cap

https://overthecap.com/julio-jones-updated-contracts-contract-decisions

Julio Jones, “Updated” Contracts, and Contract Decisions

Posted on May 20, 2018 by Jason Fitzgerald

It was just three years ago that Julio Jones agreed to a five year contract extension worth $14.25 million a season with the Falcons and now he is looking for an “update” to his contract, despite having three years remaining on the contract. I think it’s a good situation to examine and a good illustration as to why some players should consider thinking outside the box when it comes to contracts.

Generally when players look for a new contract they generally have to fit in one of three categories. One is that they have grossly outperformed their contract and deserve a raise. This usually happens when a player either signs a very early extension (think Rob Gronkowski and Antonio Brown) or was a late bloomer of sorts (think Doug Baldwin). Occasionally it just happens when someone signs a bad contract from day 1 (Adam Thielen or historically someone like Andre Johnson). The final category occurs when the market explodes and the player’s contract is no longer really in line with the market (think someone like Aaron Rodgers whose contract pays $8M a year less than Matt Ryan) and teams should consider an upgrade just to be fair.

Do any of these three situations apply to Jones?  The answer is no. Jones’ $14.25M per year figure represented a peak dollar figure at a time when he was playing at a peak level. He was in the final year of his rookie deal and playing at an elite level. He signed his contract coming off a near 1,600 yard season and finished last year with close to 1,500 yards. He isn’t better or worse than he was. If anything he is as advertised. It certainly was not a bad contract. The market hasn’t changed that much. His contract still ranks 8th in APY, 4th in 1st year cash, 7th in 3 year cash, and 3rdin both injury and full guarantees, so he hasn’t fallen out of the top 10 in any key metric. Quite frankly there is no realistic reason to stage a holdout especially when you have three years left on a contract.
Perhaps this is where the word “update” comes into play. Update isn’t necessarily the same as receiving a big new five year contract with three new years of guarantees to make a player happy. The lone contract indicator than Jones can look at as needing a fix (and even this may be a stretch) is 2018 cash. His $10.5M salary in 2018 ranks 12thamong wide receivers in the NFL. By no means is that awful (and he was 12th last year as well) but at least it’s something tangible.

There are two recent examples of a team seeing an important player with multiple contract years remaining and finding a way to make him happy. The Steelers twice moved money forward in Brown’s contract to prevent a player from being unhappy. In 2015 the Steelers moved $2 million from 2016 up to 2015 and in 2016 they moved $4 million from 2017 into 2016. Overall the team fronted him $4 million and then extended him in 2017. The other example was Gronkowski who convinced the Patriots to add $5.5 million in realistically attainable incentives to his existing contract in 2017.

From the Falcons standpoint really this should be the only consideration. The Brown route is more feasible for the Falcons who are tight on cap room and would likely need to count any incentive on the cap immediately. Otherwise a legit reworking of a contract sets a bad precedent for the organization and could put them in a negative position down the line with a player who will soon turn 30. While there are some short extensions that could avoid that precedent it is doubtful that an experienced agent would agree to that kind of structure.

I don’t blame Jones for trying this strategy. The Falcons are a win now team and win now teams generally want to avoid distractions. I’d think they would find it reasonable to do a deal that sees him increase his salary by $2 or $3 million this season to make sure he is happy when camp rolls around. I also wouldn’t blame the Falcons for playing hardball here too, though I think they will compromise on a raise.

This again brings up the point that players sometimes should think big picture instead of the initial buzz of a big contract. Jones’ contract was effectively a six year contract when he signed it (his one existing rookie contract year and five new extension years) which is an eternity in the NFL. In general when teams do long term contracts for elite level players it is the team that stands to benefit the most from the contract.

While the risk of injury is transferred from the player to the team when an extension is signed, more often than not the backend of a contract sees a player play at a relatively low cost level. For a player like Jones, the realistic contract potential is two franchise tags and then free agency. Jones would have earned about $42.3 million from 2015 to 2017 had he followed that path. He would have likely hit free agency this year where he would have probably earned $30 million this year and $56M by 2020, most of which would be guaranteed. Somewhere in the interim he also would have put the Falcons under some intense salary cap pressure which may have helped him if he decided to do an earlier extension rather than play out the tag process.

The tradeoff for the two sides here is that Jones locked in about $47M rather than $42M through 2017 but in return agrees to max his compensation out through 2020 at $81.43M rather than open the door to about $99M by 2020 and a giant windfall in 2018. Here is the estimated breakdown of the two scenarios.
 
Scenario 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
Current $22,000,000  $35,500,000 $47,000,000 $57,500,000 $70,000,000 $81,426,000
Tag $10,176,000 $24,775,000 $42,294,000 $72,294,000 $87,794,000 $99,294,000
 
As you look at the cash breakdowns you can see why I say that the team reaps the backend benefits. As long as the team sees fit for the player to play in the third new contract year the benefit dramatically shifts to the team.
When the cash disparity up front is very large its probably worth taking the deal but $5M by the 2nd year for a relatively young wide receiver who is a clear ultra elite player?  I can see the logic in playing it out and putting yourself in a situation to avoid being unhappy two years into a new deal.

The reality of the NFL is that guaranteed contracts will never happen at least in the current way teams do contracts. The goal of every player and agent should be to put yourself in the position to either hit free agency as many times as possible or put the team in a salary cap bind as many times as possible to effectively guarantee a contract. Doing a big deal just for the sake of doing a big deal isn’t in anyones best interests and contracts should never extend more than two years beyond expiring guarantees in any scenario unless compensation is tied to performance.

Teams hold almost all the cards with long term contracts and they really shouldn’t. When a few players force the issue overall I firmly believe that most will earn more money. Jones could have been one of those players.

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1 hour ago, Butudontseeme™ said:

Good article on Julio’s contract with options from over the cap

https://overthecap.com/julio-jones-updated-contracts-contract-decisions

Julio Jones, “Updated” Contracts, and Contract Decisions

Posted on May 20, 2018 by Jason Fitzgerald

It was just three years ago that Julio Jones agreed to a five year contract extension worth $14.25 million a season with the Falcons and now he is looking for an “update” to his contract, despite having three years remaining on the contract. I think it’s a good situation to examine and a good illustration as to why some players should consider thinking outside the box when it comes to contracts.

Generally when players look for a new contract they generally have to fit in one of three categories. One is that they have grossly outperformed their contract and deserve a raise. This usually happens when a player either signs a very early extension (think Rob Gronkowski and Antonio Brown) or was a late bloomer of sorts (think Doug Baldwin). Occasionally it just happens when someone signs a bad contract from day 1 (Adam Thielen or historically someone like Andre Johnson). The final category occurs when the market explodes and the player’s contract is no longer really in line with the market (think someone like Aaron Rodgers whose contract pays $8M a year less than Matt Ryan) and teams should consider an upgrade just to be fair.

Do any of these three situations apply to Jones?  The answer is no. Jones’ $14.25M per year figure represented a peak dollar figure at a time when he was playing at a peak level. He was in the final year of his rookie deal and playing at an elite level. He signed his contract coming off a near 1,600 yard season and finished last year with close to 1,500 yards. He isn’t better or worse than he was. If anything he is as advertised. It certainly was not a bad contract. The market hasn’t changed that much. His contract still ranks 8th in APY, 4th in 1st year cash, 7th in 3 year cash, and 3rdin both injury and full guarantees, so he hasn’t fallen out of the top 10 in any key metric. Quite frankly there is no realistic reason to stage a holdout especially when you have three years left on a contract.
Perhaps this is where the word “update” comes into play. Update isn’t necessarily the same as receiving a big new five year contract with three new years of guarantees to make a player happy. The lone contract indicator than Jones can look at as needing a fix (and even this may be a stretch) is 2018 cash. His $10.5M salary in 2018 ranks 12thamong wide receivers in the NFL. By no means is that awful (and he was 12th last year as well) but at least it’s something tangible.

There are two recent examples of a team seeing an important player with multiple contract years remaining and finding a way to make him happy. The Steelers twice moved money forward in Brown’s contract to prevent a player from being unhappy. In 2015 the Steelers moved $2 million from 2016 up to 2015 and in 2016 they moved $4 million from 2017 into 2016. Overall the team fronted him $4 million and then extended him in 2017. The other example was Gronkowski who convinced the Patriots to add $5.5 million in realistically attainable incentives to his existing contract in 2017.

From the Falcons standpoint really this should be the only consideration. The Brown route is more feasible for the Falcons who are tight on cap room and would likely need to count any incentive on the cap immediately. Otherwise a legit reworking of a contract sets a bad precedent for the organization and could put them in a negative position down the line with a player who will soon turn 30. While there are some short extensions that could avoid that precedent it is doubtful that an experienced agent would agree to that kind of structure.

I don’t blame Jones for trying this strategy. The Falcons are a win now team and win now teams generally want to avoid distractions. I’d think they would find it reasonable to do a deal that sees him increase his salary by $2 or $3 million this season to make sure he is happy when camp rolls around. I also wouldn’t blame the Falcons for playing hardball here too, though I think they will compromise on a raise.

This again brings up the point that players sometimes should think big picture instead of the initial buzz of a big contract. Jones’ contract was effectively a six year contract when he signed it (his one existing rookie contract year and five new extension years) which is an eternity in the NFL. In general when teams do long term contracts for elite level players it is the team that stands to benefit the most from the contract.

While the risk of injury is transferred from the player to the team when an extension is signed, more often than not the backend of a contract sees a player play at a relatively low cost level. For a player like Jones, the realistic contract potential is two franchise tags and then free agency. Jones would have earned about $42.3 million from 2015 to 2017 had he followed that path. He would have likely hit free agency this year where he would have probably earned $30 million this year and $56M by 2020, most of which would be guaranteed. Somewhere in the interim he also would have put the Falcons under some intense salary cap pressure which may have helped him if he decided to do an earlier extension rather than play out the tag process.

The tradeoff for the two sides here is that Jones locked in about $47M rather than $42M through 2017 but in return agrees to max his compensation out through 2020 at $81.43M rather than open the door to about $99M by 2020 and a giant windfall in 2018. Here is the estimated breakdown of the two scenarios.
 
Scenario 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
Current $22,000,000  $35,500,000 $47,000,000 $57,500,000 $70,000,000 $81,426,000
Tag $10,176,000 $24,775,000 $42,294,000 $72,294,000 $87,794,000 $99,294,000
 
As you look at the cash breakdowns you can see why I say that the team reaps the backend benefits. As long as the team sees fit for the player to play in the third new contract year the benefit dramatically shifts to the team.
When the cash disparity up front is very large its probably worth taking the deal but $5M by the 2nd year for a relatively young wide receiver who is a clear ultra elite player?  I can see the logic in playing it out and putting yourself in a situation to avoid being unhappy two years into a new deal.

The reality of the NFL is that guaranteed contracts will never happen at least in the current way teams do contracts. The goal of every player and agent should be to put yourself in the position to either hit free agency as many times as possible or put the team in a salary cap bind as many times as possible to effectively guarantee a contract. Doing a big deal just for the sake of doing a big deal isn’t in anyones best interests and contracts should never extend more than two years beyond expiring guarantees in any scenario unless compensation is tied to performance.

Teams hold almost all the cards with long term contracts and they really shouldn’t. When a few players force the issue overall I firmly believe that most will earn more money. Jones could have been one of those players.

Julio had a legit Agent whose job it is and was to inform him of the ramifications of any contract before he signs which I'm sure Sexton did, Julio was not forced by anyone in the organization to accept the contract which he signed knowingly and happily. The Falcons have paid Julio over a 100 million dollars in his career and have treated him like family, as for this dispute Julio had no problem when he was paid 47 million of the 71 million agreed too at the front end of his contract its only now when its the teams time to reap the benefits of Julio's long term extension. I'm sorry maybe I'm old school but I do think Julio should man up honor his name and his contract get his azz to camp work hard and produce at a high level for the next 2 years and I can guarantee the team will do right by him when he only has one year left to honor not THREE years on his current contract. Blank can not set a precedent with this situation with all the up and coming stars that we will need to sign in the next few years, no one and I do mean no one is worth losing the teams chemistry over...

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1 hour ago, Falcons&Dawgs#1Fan said:

Julio had a legit Agent whose job it is and was to inform him of the ramifications of any contract before he signs which I'm sure Sexton did, Julio was not forced by anyone in the organization to accept the contract which he signed knowingly and happily. The Falcons have paid Julio over a 100 million dollars in his career and have treated him like family, as for this dispute Julio had no problem when he was paid 47 million of the 71 million agreed too at the front end of his contract its only now when its the teams time to reap the benefits of Julio's long term extension. I'm sorry maybe I'm old school but I do think Julio should man up honor his name and his contract get his azz to camp work hard and produce at a high level for the next 2 years and I can guarantee the team will do right by him when he only has one year left to honor not THREE years on his current contract. Blank can not set a precedent with this situation with all the up and coming stars that we will need to sign in the next few years, no one and I do mean no one is worth losing the teams chemistry over...

K? You don’t think Julio’s agent knows what’s going on with this? If they didn’t think there was a real possibility of retooling the contract, he wouldn’t be sitting out. I don’t like it either, but Julio has put his hand on the table, knowing the cards the team/FO holds while also knowing the only real leverage he has is outside pressure to do what he wants. @Peyton said earlier in this thread or another thread exactly what this article is outlining as far as paying him upfront front  for $$ in ‘19. 

As far as honoring contracts, these contracts aren’t worth the paper they’re written on... players and teams alike disregard them at their earliest convenience. Remember how Toilolo was released earlier this offseason, you know, one year after signing a new deal? 

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6 minutes ago, Butudontseeme™ said:

K? You don’t think Julio’s agent knows what’s going on with this? If they didn’t think there was a real possibility of retooling the contract, he wouldn’t be sitting out. I don’t like it either, but Julio has put his hand on the table, knowing the cards the team/FO holds while also knowing the only real leverage he has is outside pressure to do what he wants. @Peyton said earlier in this thread or another thread exactly what this article is outlining as far as paying him upfront front  for $$ in ‘19. 

As far as honoring contracts, these contracts aren’t worth the paper they’re written on... players and teams alike disregard them at their earliest convenience. Remember how Toilolo was released earlier this offseason, you know, one year after signing a new deal? 

These front loaded contracts benefit the player early in the contract which is risky for the organization when the player can get hurt and the team would lose all the guaranteed money however it does give the player some sense of long term security. The opposite is true on the back-end its the teams turn to benefit from a long term deal. That's why everyone on both sides have to understand the ramifications of the entire contract.

All of this is a result of the QB's receiving ridiculous over-paid contracts and guys at all the other positions thinking they can play the same game when in actuality 99% of the time they are miscalculating their leverage. QB is a way more important position to play and should be the highest paid player on the team if their performance warrants it, way more important than any other position on the team and there's the rub these guys see average to great QB's (Sam Bradford) who usually are not worthy receiving these crazy 100 million dollar deals and these guys get pi$$ed off when the team wont get them the same money. The team wouldn't be able to pay them the same amount even if they wanted to you would eventually have about 6 stars and 47 scrubs on each team which would lead to loss of viewership and eventually to collapse and loss of the game itself.

Having said all of that you have to have some type of payment arrangement short-term, long term, one year franchise tags something has to be agreed upon by both parties in order to have a binding agreement. Until the league can figure out something with these ludicrous QB deals this problem is only going to get worse and worse.

I enjoyed your post Butyoudontseeme, great read... 

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