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Bleacher Report 2017 NFL1000 rankings (Falcons Edition)


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QB

11. Matt Ryan, Atlanta Falcons

Accuracy: 19/25
Arm: 20/25
Under Pressure: 17/20
Decision-Making: 16/20
Position Value: 10/10
Overall Grade: 82/100

It's difficult to duplicate one of the NFL's best seasons as a passer, and Matt Ryan fell short of matching his eye-popping numbers posted in 2016. Under new offensive coordinator Steve Sarkisian, the Atlanta Falcons struggled at times to get their offense going. Ryan still showed impressive traits at the position, most notably his anticipation on routes at all levels of the field, and he was adept at avoiding pressure in the pocket and extending plays with his legs. Some multiple-interception games (three against Detroit and two against Buffalo), caused his numbers to drop a bit.

 

 

 

 

RB

14. Tevin Coleman, Atlanta Falcons

Inside Running: 17/25
Outside Running: 22/25
Receiving: 15/20
Blocking: 14/20
Position Value: 7/10
Overall Grade: 75/100

Using Tevin Coleman as the secondary punch after Devonta Freeman is a huge advantage for the Falcons offense. He's a better outside runner than inside, as he can turn the edge with a burst of speed and run away from defenders. Coleman is a home run hitter who defenses need to be ready for as he can break any given run for a huge gain.

6. Devonta Freeman, Atlanta Falcons

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Inside Running: 21/25
Outside Running: 20/25
Receiving: 15/20
Blocking: 17/20
Position Value: 7/10
Overall Grade: 80/100

The Falcons offense had some turnover, with the key change being offensive coordinator Kyle Shanahan leaving to coach the 49ers. With Steve Sarkisian hasn't come close to reproducing the explosive of Falcons last season, he's relied on Devonta Freeman and the running game. Freeman runs the ball effectively inside and out in the Falcons' zone scheme, which requires him to make decisive reads to optimize his paths before bursting upfield with a sharp cut that he executes so smoothly. He's also a strong route-runner and an excellent pass protector.
—NFL1000 running backs scout Mark Bullock

The ability to run inside zone with the vision and power required and to run outside zone with the breaking speed to hit the edge and elude outside defenders? That's a rarer combination of skills than you might think. Freeman is a violent inside runner, a quick outside runner with an explosive extra burst upfield, and when given the opportunity, he's a versatile receiver out of the backfield and when motioned into the slot or outside. The switch in offensive coordinators from Shanahan to Sarkisian made the Falcons offense more generic in how running backs were utilized, but Freeman did as well as he possibly could.
—NFL1000 lead scout Doug Farrar

 

 

WR

66. Justin Hardy, Atlanta Falcons

Route Running: 14/30
Hands: 12/25
YAC: 9/20
Blocking: 11/15
Position Value: 8/10
Overall Grade: 54/100

In his third season in the NFL, Hardy failed to become anything more than a complementary receiver. He's more than adequate as a blocker and has experience playing both on the outside and in the slot. But he hasn't been able to contribute much as a wideout. Hardy's best performances come from the slot, but Mohamed Sanu dominated that role. Hardy might need to find a new home if he wants to carve out a bigger place in an offense.

62. Taylor Gabriel, Atlanta Falcons

Route Running: 12/30
Hands: 12/25
YAC: 14/20
Blocking: 9/15
Position Value: 8/10
Overall Grade: 55/100

In Kyle Shanahan's offense, Gabriel presented mismatches and scored seven touchdowns in 2016. But in 2017, he wasn't nearly as effective. The 5'8", 165-pounder is an undersized receiver who has improved as a route-runner, but his game is still based off creating big plays after the catch. The 26-year-old isn't an every-down starter, but he can create one or two splash plays a game.

4. Julio Jones, Atlanta Falcons

Route Running: 27/30
Hands: 19/25
YAC: 18/20
Blocking: 8/15
Position Value: 8/10
Overall Grade: 80/100

The loss of Kyle Shanahan has proved to be a massive detriment to the Atlanta Falcons as most anticipated. But one of the biggest changes in the offense is usage of Julio Jones. He's targeted at the same ratio he was in previous years, but there are fewer opportunities for eplosive plays in Steve Sarkisian's passing game. However, Jones is still one of the best receivers in the NFL and maybe the most terrifying one-on-one matchup the league has seen in some time. Make no mistake about it, Jones is still in the conversation for the best wideout in the league.

—NFL1000 WR scout Marcus Mosher

     

Jones was limited in several ways by Steve Sarkisian's offense. Sark's inability to scheme receivers open as Kyle Shanahan did meant that defenses didn't need to game-plan as much for Atlanta's other receivers and could correspondingly focus more on Jones. In addition, Jones had just three receiving touchdowns, as Matt Ryan saw his red-zone vision regress with a new set of schemes. When he's given half a chance with his playbook, Jones is still as talented as he's ever been, but the 2017 season has been an extreme example of how a bad offensive coordinator can erase talent just as surely as the best defender.

—NFL1000 lead scout Doug Farrar

 

Slot WR

10. Mohamed Sanu, Atlanta Falcons

Route Running: 22/30
Hands: 18/25
YAC: 12/20
Blocking: 10/15
Position Value: 7/10
Overall Grade: 69/100

With Julio Jones demanding all the attention from opposing defenses in 2017, Mohamed Sanu had one of the best seasons of his career. Sanu is a bigger slot receiver who also the ability to play on the outside in the Falcons' two-receiver sets. Sanu's game can be streaky at times, as his production often depends on the cornerback he is facing. If he is facing a smaller cornerback in the slot, he can overpower him with his size and strong hands. But if he draws a bigger cornerback, he can struggle because he doesn't always create enough separation. Sanu has found himself in a nice role as the Falcons' No. 2 receiver.

—NFL1000 WR scout Marcus Mosher

     

Like most of the best slot receivers, Sanu is very creative in short spaces—he understands how to use his hands against a defender to get separation, and then he's astute when it comes to running routes in ways that present himself as an easy open read to the quarterback. Sanu also has the smooth acceleration to be an asset on deep seam routes. He doesn't have top-end speed, but he comes to play with most other necessary assets.

—NFL1000 lead scout Doug Farrar

 

 

TE

38. Levine Toilolo, Atlanta Falcons

Route Running: 10/20
Hands: 13/25
YAC: 8/20
Blocking: 22/25
Position Value: 7/10
Overall Grade: 60/100

Levine Toilolo took a back seat to second-year tight end Austin Hooper. The move backward actually served him well, as he could focus on being more of a blocker than a receiver. Like Hooper, Toilolo is a Stanford product, and the latter thrived as a blocker with his enormous size (6'8", 265 lbs). As a receiver, Toilolo didn't show much quickness or the separation skills to scare defenders. But because of his size, he will always be an intriguing player in the red zone. Toilolo didn't have a flashy or big statistical season, but he was an important part of the Falcons offense—especially the running game.

21. Austin Hooper, Atlanta Falcons

Route Running: 14/20
Hands: 11/25
YAC: 11/20
Blocking: 20/25
Position Value: 7/10
Overall Grade: 63/100

In his second season in the NFL, Austin Hooper nearly doubled his yards tally from 2016. He wasn't, however, as dominant in the passing game as you would expect from someone as talented as he is. After a massive Week 1 performance against the Bears, in which he totaled 128 yards and a touchdown, Hooper was quiet as a receiver for the rest of the season. He displayed his above-average athleticism, but he had too many drops and wasn't as dynamic in the passing attack as he should have been. Hooper did drastically improve as a blocker, specifically in the running game, but he has the talent and the potential to be a much better receiver as well. Hooper was better this season than he was as a rookie, but he is nowhere near his ceiling.

 

 

 

LT

8. Jake Matthews, Atlanta Falcons

Pass Protection: 18/25
Run Blocking: 16/20
Power: 16/20
Agility: 17/25
Position Value: 9/10
Overall Grade: 76/100

Jake Matthews made a significant jump in development in 2016, proving to be a key piece for Atlanta as it reached Super Bowl 51. The sixth overall pick in the 2014 draft continued to build his skill set in 2017, leaning on technique and fundamentals as he bookended the Falcons' left edge.

Matthews surrendered only three quarterback sacks per our charting while helping pave the way for 1,847 yards and a 4.3 yards-per-carry average in the running game. He showed the footwork, hand placement and body control when asked to reach and seal edge defenders, springing many big runs throughout the course of the regular season.

—NFL1000 OT Scout Duke Manyweather

                         

Both as a pass-blocker and run-blocker, Matthews has learned to generate power and consistent strength with a low, wide base and a nasty demeanor when drive-blocking. His footwork can be choppy at times when he's dropping back or on the move—he's not what you'd call a top-10 lower-body athlete at the position—but he has more than enough lower-body power and acceleration to the second level to help Atlanta's multifaceted running game go.

—NFL1000 Lead Scout Doug Farrar

 

Guard

68. Ben Garland, Atlanta Falcons

Pass Protection: 11/25
Run Block: 16/25
Power: 15/20
Agility: 14/20
Position Value: 7/10
Overall Grade: 63/100

The fact that Ben Garland made it so far up this list is impressive in itself, given he has played both ways in the past and has some physical limitations from a frame standpoint. He got beat a lot in pass protection, but considering the context of his situation, the job he did replacing Andy Levitre is nothing to scoff at.

54. Wes Schweitzer, Atlanta Falcons

Pass Protection: 14/25
Run Block: 15/25
Power: 14/20
Agility: 16/20
Position Value: 7/10
Overall Grade: 66/100

Wes Schweitzer is fluid from the hip down and can match quicker defenders, but it's hard to imagine him rising to the top of this list with his mental processing and physical strength limitations. While you can get away with being quick and efficient in the Falcons blocking scheme, if he doesn't figure out how to process opposing fronts, he will likely need to be replaced going forward.

16. Andy Levitre, Atlanta Falcons

Pass Protection: 17/25
Run Block: 16/25
Power: 17/20
Agility: 14/20
Position Value: 7/10
Overall Grade: 71/100

Andy Levitre has been quite the wily vet since arriving in Atlanta. He has really turned around his career after not living up to his big contract in Tennessee and getting shipped to Flowery Branch. The Falcons' read-heavy blocking assignments and propensity for deuce blocks, both areas in which he thrives, are big reasons for his turnaround. Levitre has a knack for anticipating the run flows of opposing fronts and attacking the vacancies those flows create. He can also process things quickly post-snap and adjust his approach in real time.

23. Brandon Fusco, San Francisco 49ers

Pass Protection: 15/25
Run Block: 16/25
Power: 17/20
Agility: 15/20
Position Value: 7/10
Overall Grade: 70/100

Brandon Fusco had a pretty nice season after bouncing onto the 49ers roster and winning a starting job following Joshua Garnett's injury. He's never been a detailed pass protector or had top-end physical traits just waiting to be tapped, but a year with Kyle Shanahan and line coach John Benton seemed to do wonders for Fusco's ability to move his feet and keep a half-man relationship snap in and snap out.

Center

3. Alex Mack, Atlanta Falcons

Pass Protection: 16/25
Run Block: 20/25
Power: 17/20
Agility: 18/20
Position Value: 6/10
Overall Grade: 77/100

Alex Mack is the ultimate second-level player. Thanks to how he explodes out of his stance, his timing and feel for when to peel off combo blocks, as well as his fluidity in the open field, there are not many players who are better at getting on top of smaller bodies and clearing them out of running lanes. His ability to reset his base is among the best in the league and is what gives him an edge in both the run and pass game.

—NFL1000 OL Scout Ethan Young

             

After Mack signed a five-year, $45 million contract with the Falcons in 2016, he struggled with second-level blocking for the first few weeks. But intelligence and technique took over, and Mack became a great blocker in space. He was a key cog in Atlanta's 2016 offense, and though that unit took several steps back schematically in 2017, Mack's effect didn't diminish. He's a tremendous power blocker who has proved an exceptional ability to adapt to whatever scheme is presented to him.

—NFL1000 Lead Scout Doug Farrar

 

RT

8. Ryan Schraeder, Atlanta Falcons

Pass Protection: 18/25
Run Block: 17/20
Power: 18/25
Agility: 16/20
Position Value: 8/10
Overall Grade: 77/100

Ryan Schraeder's journey from Division II Valdosta State to Atlanta Falcons starter is one of the better success stories in the NFL.

Schraeder plays with a perfect balance of controlled aggression and calculated patience. He uses his length and agility to be a solid pass protector, although he does run into trouble when defenders get under his pads and he is unable to releverage his hands to gain control. Schraeder is powerful in the running game and is able to torque and forcefully turn defenders off of the edge while also tracking and executing blocks in space.

—NFL1000 OT Scout, Duke Manyweather

     

Atlanta's offense was far less explosive under new offensive coordinator Steve Sarkisian than it had been under Kyle Shanahan, but Schraeder's game was one example of improvement in 2017. He showed better footwork, allowing him to be more agile and adaptable to the defender, and he's able to match that agility with strength in the run game. Schraeder will never be one of the league's most powerful blockers, but he's developed into one of the most reliable at his position.

—NFL1000 Lead Scout Doug Farrar

 

ILB

8. Deion Jones, Atlanta Falcons

Pass Defense: 20/25
Run Defense: 19/25
Pass Rush: 10/15
Tackling: 19/25
Position Value: 7/10
Overall Grade: 75/100

Deion Jones continues to flash the speed and tenacity that made him a standout rookie defender. Any perceived lack of size is offset by Jones' relentless hustle and effort. Strong interior offensive lines can bully Jones in short-yardage situations, but the Falcons' young defensive centerpiece wins with force upon contact and athleticism to range sideline to sideline. Jones looks like the prototypical defender to compete in a good NFC South division.

—NFL1000 ILB Scout Jerod Brown

While Jones has impressive physicality for his size, he's more in the modern linebacker/safety hybrid paradigm. He's agile, and his excellent intermediate and deep coverage techniques allow him to take receivers up the middle and up the seam on deep posts and vertical routes. He's become the epicenter of Atlanta's defense in just two seasons.

—NFL1000 Lead Scout Doug Farrar

 

OLB

32. Duke Riley, Atlanta Falcons

Coverage: 14/25
Run Defense: 16/25
Pass Rush: 9/15
Tackling: 17/25
Position Value: 7/10
Overall Grade: 63/100

Duke Riley did not turn out to be the first-year impact player Atlanta had hoped for. He opened the season in the starting lineup, but suffered a minor knee injury and was never reinserted. In his limited time, he proved to be a superb athlete in space with potential to burst through the line of scrimmage, but his inability to handle blocks and consistently trusts his reads hurt him. Riley was, in many ways, the player many worried Deion Jones would be. Riley can still develop moving forward.

 

15. De'Vondre Campbell, Atlanta Falcons

Coverage: 16/25
Run Defense: 18/25
Pass Rush: 11/15
Tackling: 18/25
Position Value: 7/10
Overall Grade: 70/100

De'Vondre Campbell was one of the most net-neutral players in the league. In run defense, he hardly accelerated through the line of scrimmage to make impact plays, but he was often in position to control his gap and maintain the integrity of the defensive structure. He was a more intriguing passing-down player, with vast highs and lows in coverage. He dropped into zones well but could not always carry with premier athletes. He was best used on third down as a blitzer, where he was consistently able to get to the quarterback.

 

DE

57. Derrick Shelby, Atlanta Falcons

Pass Rush: 20/30
Run Defense: 15/20
Snap Quickness: 12/20
Tackling: 12/20
Position Value: 8/10
Overall Grade: 67/100

Derrick Shelby isn't an ideal starting 4-3 defensive end, but he's not asked to do that in Atlanta. He's a larger-body end (6'2", 280) who wins with his hands more than his feet. Even when given time late in a down, Shelby can find it hard to disengage from bookends. He's a functional rotational edge defender.

 

42. Adrian Clayborn, Atlanta Falcons

Pass Rush: 22/30
Run Defense: 14/20
Snap Quickness: 13/20
Tackling: 12/20
Position Value: 8/10
Overall Grade: 69/100

Obviously, the highlight of Adrian Clayborn's 2017 season was his six-sack game against the Dallas Cowboys. That legendary performance even featured a sack he recorded after dropping into coverage. From a stylistic standpoint, he's a power-rusher compared to teammates Vic Beasley and Brooks Reed. He doesn't have the legs to be much of a chase player, but he's tough at the line of scrimmage.

 

31. Brooks Reed, Atlanta Falcons

Pass Rush: 21/30
Run Defense: 14/20
Snap Quickness: 14/20
Tackling: 14/20
Position Value: 8/10
Overall Grade: 71/100

The first thing you need to note about Brooks Reed is that he's a flexible athlete. In terms of how well he can bend the edge or hit a spin move, he's just as fluid as Vic Beasley. The issue with Reed is that his burst off the line of scrimmage comes and goes. When he's on, he's one of the more underrated defensive ends in the sport.

 

28. Vic Beasley, Atlanta Falcons

Pass Rush: 22/30
Run Defense: 13/20
Snap Quickness: 14/20
Tackling: 14/20
Position Value: 8/10
Overall Grade: 71/100

2017 was a bit of a down year for Vic Beasley. The hybrid defensive end and outside linebacker didn't lose a step in his burst off the line of scrimmage, but he didn't bend around the corner quite the same as he did last year. Part of that could have been a hamstring injury that kept him out of three games and out of the starting lineup in five more. Look for Beasley to bounce back in 2018.

 

24. Takkarist McKinley, Atlanta Falcons

Pass Rush: 23/30
Run Defense: 15/20
Snap Quickness: 14/20
Tackling: 12/20
Position Value: 8/10
Overall Grade: 72/100

Takkarist McKinley's rookie season should be viewed as a plus for Atlanta Falcons fans. Though he had his share of mistakes, it's important to remember he's only a few years removed from junior college football. He has high-end twitch, which translates well moving forward if he can finish a bit better. Many people got on Vic Beasley for the same thing in 2015 before he led the NFL in sacks in 2016.

 

 

 

DT

92. Ahtyba Rubin, Atlanta Falcons

Snap Quickness: 13/25
Pass Rush: 12/25
Run Defense: 15/25
Tackling: 9/15
Position Value: 7/10
Overall Grade: 56/100

Rubin is predominantly a nose tackle, playing head up over the center or shaded on either shoulder. He has good natural leverage and play strength to create stalemates at the point of attack, with solid lateral quickness and processing to read his keys and maintain outside leverage versus attempted reach blocks. The 31-year-old works hard to get his helmet across blockers to show colors in his gap as a shade, and he works hard in pursuit down the line of scrimmage. He does a solid job of working under blockers' pads with leverage and using his hands to split double-teams. The 6'2", 310-pounder has little juice or power as a rusher but stays active and plays with a good motor to keep offensive linemen working.

 

80. Courtney Upshaw, Atlanta Falcons

Snap Quickness: 14/25
Pass Rush: 13/25
Run Defense: 14/25
Tackling: 9/15
Position Value: 7/10
Overall Grade: 57/100

Upshaw has a maxed-out frame and a thick build, particularly through his limbs. The Falcons used him as a utility player up and down the line of scrimmage, primarily off the edge as a 5-, 6- or 7-technique. He's quick off snaps and strong, with good hand usage to set the edge in the run game and play on the shoulder of offensive linemen, keeping his outside arm free. Upshaw fares well on the backside of runs keeping contain, staying home for the cutback and flowing down the line of scrimmage in pursuit. He will get pinned and engulfed against double-teams and combos when further inside as a 1- or 3-technique, as he lacks the size, length and strength to root his feet. The 28-year-old has enough quickness and hand technique to get penetration on tackle-end or end-tackle stunts.

 

61. Dontari Poe, Atlanta Falcons

Snap Quickness: 13/25
Pass Rush: 14/25
Run Defense: 16/25
Tackling: 9/15
Position Value: 7/10
Overall Grade: 59/100

Poe's huge frame, strength and build help him hold his ground against the vertical run game. He can stack and hold the point against drive/base blocks and double-teams. Despite his athleticism, he's slow to diagnose scoop and reach blocks, which results in blockers easily gaining outside leverage. Poe struggles to protect himself against cut blocks, as he fails to use his hands to wash down, leaving his legs susceptible to contact. He primarily wins using a club move as a pass-rusher, but lacks a pass-rush plan when it doesn't work. He defaults to a bull rush and fails to show an effective counter move.

 

4. Grady Jarrett, Atlanta Falcons

Snap Quickness: 22/25
Pass Rush: 18/25
Run Defense: 19/25
Tackling: 13/15
Position Value: 7/10
Overall Grade: 79/100

Grady Jarrett is one of the most active, explosive interior defensive linemen in the NFL. He displays outstanding natural leverage, elite snap quickness, explosive hands and a relentless motor. The three-year veteran also recognizes traps, pulls and screens quickly, and he shows elite pursuit skills to chase down plays from the back side.

Jarrett is difficult to reach due to his upfield quickness and accurate hands at the point of attack, which allow him to win outside leverage. He's capable of stacking the point man on doubles or dropping to a knee and splitting. The Clemson product has a variety of techniques to win as a pass-rusher, including a club swim move, hump and spin. He quickly recognizes slide protection to his side, demonstrating good lateral quickness to penetrate across opponents' faces and move the QB off his spot.

—NFL1000 DT Scout, Brandon Thorn

One of the greatest mysteries of recent drafts is how Jarrett, one of the fundamental pieces of the great Clemson defenses when he was there, lasted until the fifth round in 2015. Size was a concern for multiple teams, but as Jarrett has shown, his 6'0", 305-pound frame doesn't matter. Jarrett is primarily an active 3-tech who bombs through blockers to get through the pocket, but he can also line up as a 1-tech between the center and guard, using active hands to defeat his opponent. 

—NFL1000 Lead Scout, Doug Farrar

 

 

CB

25. Robert Alford, Atlanta Falcons

Coverage: 17/25
Reaction: 18/25
Recovery: 18/25
Tackling: 11/15
Position Value: 10/10
Overall Grade: 74/100

Robert Alford has been one of the most underrated corners in the NFL over the past two seasons. He finished the year with the second-most passes defensed (23), and was a versatile cog in Atlanta's much-improved defense. He's capable of playing in press and off-man alignments, as well as sliding inside to the slot. He'll get grabby if he loses early in routes, and he sometimes struggles to identify in-breaking routes, causing him to grade as an above-average, but not great, player.

14. Desmond Trufant, Atlanta Falcons

Coverage: 20/25
Reaction: 19/25
Recovery: 18/25
Tackling: 10/15
Position Value: 10/10
Overall Grade: 77/100

After losing half of his 2016 campaign to a torn pectoral muscle, the Falcons' Desmond Trufant had a solid bounce-back season, though he wasn't quite as dominant as pre-injury. He was arguably the league's best pure cover man in 2015, showing elite route recognition and anticipation skill. He still had stretches in 2017 where offenses couldn't complete anything to his assignment, but he struggled at times to stay in the hip of his man as well as he did the previous two seasons.

 

 

Slot CB

13. Brian Poole, Atlanta Falcons

Coverage: 13/20
Reaction: 18/30
Recovery: 15/25
Tackling: 12/15
Position Value: 8/10
Overall Grade: 66/100

Brian Poole doesn't have the type of ball production to garners much attention or praise, but his reliability to play in zone coverage and defend the run has him graded higher than more accomplished resumes. Poole's a standout finisher and capable defender in the flat and on underneath crossing and curl routes. He doesn't have the speed or length to move outside, but his fit in Atlanta's physical unit is unquestionable.

 

 

FS

23. Ricardo Allen, Atlanta Falcons

Coverage: 20/30
Recovery: 21/30
Slot Performance: 5/10
Tackling: 11/20
Position Value: 8/10
Overall Grade: 65/100

Ironically, Allen is better near the line of scrimmage, even if he is 186 pounds. The farther away he gets, the slower he reacts. Near the line he can win with his quickness to make tackles. Speaking of tackling: Poor angles and lack of aggressiveness hurt his grade. The 26-year-old wasn't bad, he just didn't do anything to stick out.

 

 

SS

7. Keanu Neal, Atlanta Falcons

Coverage: 19/25
Recovery: 15/20
Slot Performance: 17/20
Tackling: 20/25
Position Value: 8/10
Overall Grade: 79/100

Keanu Neal continues to improve. The Falcons used him all over the place, and he didn't disappoint. He's an enforcer against the run. You won't find three better run defenders. Where Neal really progressed was in man coverage against tight ends, though. He could always make the big hit, but he's now reliable in coverage as well. Neal is on a fast track to be a top safety.

—NFL1000 DB Scout, Kyle Posey

                            

In his second NFL season, Neal continued to improve as a run defender, both at linebacker depth and at the line of scrimmage. He also got better as a pass defender all the way to the deep third. In addition, the 22-year-old is a fine slot defender against short and intermediate routes. Neal struggles at times when receivers run more angular routes—his recovery speed isn't always optimal—but he's an ideal strong safety in a defense that has clearly defined roles.

—NFL1000 Lead Scout Doug Farrar

 

 

 

 

 

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Edit: Missed link at the very top...

JJ #4 Outside WR

Route Running: 27/30
Hands: 19/25
YAC: 18/20
Blocking: 8/15
Position Value: 8/10
Overall Grade: 80/100

The loss of Kyle Shanahan has proved to be a massive detriment to the Atlanta Falcons as most anticipated. But one of the biggest changes in the offense is usage of Julio Jones. He's targeted at the same ratio he was in previous years, but there are fewer opportunities for eplosive plays in Steve Sarkisian's passing game. However, Jones is still one of the best receivers in the NFL and maybe the most terrifying one-on-one matchup the league has seen in some time. Make no mistake about it, Jones is still in the conversation for the best wideout in the league.

—NFL1000 WR scout Marcus Mosher

     

Jones was limited in several ways by Steve Sarkisian's offense. Sark's inability to scheme receivers open as Kyle Shanahan did meant that defenses didn't need to game-plan as much for Atlanta's other receivers and could correspondingly focus more on Jones. In addition, Jones had just three receiving touchdowns, as Matt Ryan saw his red-zone vision regress with a new set of schemes. When he's given half a chance with his playbook, Jones is still as talented as he's ever been, but the 2017 season has been an extreme example of how a bad offensive coordinator can erase talent just as surely as the best defender.

—NFL1000 lead scout Doug Farrar

Edited by Leggggggo
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36 minutes ago, Leggggggo said:

Edit: Missed link at the very top...

JJ #4 Outside WR

Route Running: 27/30
Hands: 19/25
YAC: 18/20
Blocking: 8/15
Position Value: 8/10
Overall Grade: 80/100

The loss of Kyle Shanahan has proved to be a massive detriment to the Atlanta Falcons as most anticipated. But one of the biggest changes in the offense is usage of Julio Jones. He's targeted at the same ratio he was in previous years, but there are fewer opportunities for eplosive plays in Steve Sarkisian's passing game. However, Jones is still one of the best receivers in the NFL and maybe the most terrifying one-on-one matchup the league has seen in some time. Make no mistake about it, Jones is still in the conversation for the best wideout in the league.

—NFL1000 WR scout Marcus Mosher

     

Jones was limited in several ways by Steve Sarkisian's offense. Sark's inability to scheme receivers open as Kyle Shanahan did meant that defenses didn't need to game-plan as much for Atlanta's other receivers and could correspondingly focus more on Jones. In addition, Jones had just three receiving touchdowns, as Matt Ryan saw his red-zone vision regress with a new set of schemes. When he's given half a chance with his playbook, Jones is still as talented as he's ever been, but the 2017 season has been an extreme example of how a bad offensive coordinator can erase talent just as surely as the best defender.

—NFL1000 lead scout Doug Farrar

Thanks ... just included the WRs

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On 2/13/2018 at 4:53 AM, Falcanuck said:

I don’t really understand the Poe review. It’s like they only grade DTs well in run D if THEY make the tackle. Poe’s job was to make Deion’s job easier. He did a really good job of that in 2017, actually. 

I think he did a good job too.... I think some of yall are higher on Poe then i am but i think he came in and played some good ball

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On 2/13/2018 at 4:53 AM, Falcanuck said:

I don’t really understand the Poe review. It’s like they only grade DTs well in run D if THEY make the tackle. Poe’s job was to make Deion’s job easier. He did a really good job of that in 2017, actually. 

Agreed, eat up blockers and keep the lbs clean to make the tackle.

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Ranked 23rd out of the 83 Guards ranked.... Again this is a nice little signing for the price

 

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23. Brandon Fusco, San Francisco 49ers

Pass Protection: 15/25
Run Block: 16/25
Power: 17/20
Agility: 15/20
Position Value: 7/10
Overall Grade: 70/100

Brandon Fusco had a pretty nice season after bouncing onto the 49ers roster and winning a starting job following Joshua Garnett's injury. He's never been a detailed pass protector or had top-end physical traits just waiting to be tapped, but a year with Kyle Shanahan and line coach John Benton seemed to do wonders for Fusco's ability to move his feet and keep a half-man relationship snap in and snap out.

 

 

 

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