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Post your ideas on how to decrease CTE in NFL players.


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Isn't specifically TATF, but obviously includes players from all teams including ours. 

I have some brain damage from concussions that I have suffered in my life. I think I had a light concussion in H.S. and had one walking on in college that I had no business doing. Other than that I have had 3 more severe concussions in ATV accidents. I developed epilepsy and have problems with anxiety and to a lesser degree depression. I'm sure a few posters just said "Oh ok now I get it." Anyway the CTE epidemic is something that I relate too and just can't imagine the **** these men live in. I keep posting stuff on CTE in threads so I would rather just start a post and hopefully get a real dialogue going.

I have my own ideas that I will share if this thread goes anywhere. I would love to hear any and all ideas you guys have, and I plan to write to the NFLPA, and other organizations regarding possible changes that could be made. I have a professor of neurobiology that has promised to help me with it and sign his name along side mine to give it credibility.

So post any ideas you guys have. No idea is stupid because it is a brainstorm exercise. I definitely won't flame anyone for anything they say as I just appreciate the participation, and awareness that such participation creates. Thank you falcon or any other fans that are from other teams that come hear for the entertainment. It is definitely one of the better message boards in the league.

Thank you guys, and gals. Go Falcons!

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For football players there needs to be better technique around contact.

Tackling is a start getting your head out of the way of forearms knees hips is a good start.

I been a huge proponent for rugby style tackling on here for years.Anything that keeps the head away from an unnecessary contact is a good start.

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I don't know the facts about the mechanism of trauma.  For example, what are the most common collisions that produce concussion in football players?  Before this season, I always believed concussions most commonly occurred when both players were moving at high speeds.  

Neither Schraeder nor Freeman were moving at particularly high speeds. I think both were concussed when their heads hit the ground forcibly.  

So how do we reduce or eliminate concussions that occur in a variety of ways?  I'll take a stab at some possible interventions.

1.  Make helmets bulkier with layers of padding of different mediums (Air/Liquid).  The goal is to slow the change of velocity of the brain during a collision.

2.  Severely penalize players (large yardage and frequent ejections) for collisions that are head-first.  We have to stop players from using their helmets as battering rams.  Technologies can be added to helmets to sense when the crown of the head is the leading collision point. 

3.  Permit more hands-on techniques by OL's and DB's.  In both cases, players will be slowed down slightly and hopefully reduce the speed of impacts.

These are just stabs in the dark, but I agree that substantial changes need to be enacted to preserve the game.   

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Football along with many other pro sports is high risk, high reward. If you do not want to risk injury then do not play and get a normal job that is far less glamorous and profitable.

Plenty of people get paid less to do far more dangerous work.

 

Although I think the NFL needs to develop more disposable helmets that absorb impacts and crumple the same way new cars do to lessen the trauma inside the head.

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There is no way to eliminate it, but rules changes can reduce it for some positions. The problem with concussions is only partly attributable to the head being externally impacted. Inertia is what causes many concussions and when someone who is going forward with great energy is suddenly being stopped by a good hit, it will result in the brain moving forward, even as the body no longer is. This can result in the brain striking the skull. No helmet design is going to prevent that. For that reason, blockers will always be at risk due to the nature of the contact in their role.

Years ago, someone suggested that removing helmets would result in fewer injuries because players would be less reckless if they were just as likely to knock themselves out of the game. They'd be forced into rugby tackling for self preservation. Perhaps that is the solution, radical as it would be.

Helmets are like back belts for people who do heavy lifting for jobs, offering a deceptive level of safety. Back belts can result in the worker being injured when he's not wearing them because the back of not strengthened from its use and that's not always realized until series injury occurs. And helmets can result in injury by the sense of security they provide. It's human nature to test limits and some tacklers will go as hard and fast as they can until they learn the limits of safety.

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2 hours ago, ATLSlobberKnockers said:

Isn't specifically TATF, but obviously includes players from all teams including ours. 

I have some brain damage from concussions that I have suffered in my life. I think I had a light concussion in H.S. and had one walking on in college that I had no business doing. Other than that I have had 3 more severe concussions in ATV accidents. I developed epilepsy and have problems with anxiety and to a lesser degree depression. I'm sure a few posters just said "Oh ok now I get it." Anyway the CTE epidemic is something that I relate too and just can't imagine the **** these men live in. I keep posting stuff on CTE in threads so I would rather just start a post and hopefully get a real dialogue going.

I have my own ideas that I will share if this thread goes anywhere. I would love to hear any and all ideas you guys have, and I plan to write to the NFLPA, and other organizations regarding possible changes that could be made. I have a professor of neurobiology that has promised to help me with it and sign his name along side mine to give it credibility.

So post any ideas you guys have. No idea is stupid because it is a brainstorm exercise. I definitely won't flame anyone for anything they say as I just appreciate the participation, and awareness that such participation creates. Thank you falcon or any other fans that are from other teams that come hear for the entertainment. It is definitely one of the better message boards in the league.

Thank you guys, and gals. Go Falcons!

sorry for my sarcastic response

Ive also suffered multiple concussions throughout high school and college while playing sports of all kinds. I have issues remembering things alot even right after i do them sometimes. I have some issues with anxiety and depression as well. I think that anyone that get a concussion or has repeated knocks to the head will deal with some form of CTE and if we had our heads examined when we die youd find it in many people who have played sports or extreme sports. Travis Pastrana has to have a melted brain, that guys had more concussions than anyone ive ever heard of.

as far as what we can do to help prevent injuries? Nothing substantial without making the game flag football.. it is what it is. we are creating larger and faster humans year after year and the amount of force they generate becomes greater and greater.. just look at the hit Allen had last week and you can only imagine the amount of force behind the hit and the g force he experienced while spinning around in the air after the hit.

football is no different than boxing or ufc, its a brutal sport and those who participate willingly know the ultimate price they are paying to play a game.

I think things need to be done at the youth level to help prevent some of these injuries. kids playing tackle football at the age of 6 and 7 is just far to young, the mind isnt even developed yet.

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I coach a jr high football team, and I can tell having played HS football in the 90's the sport is changing.  Our local HS does no full contact in practice, we at the younger levels do maybe 15 min of full contact per practice to be sure they have the proper technique down.

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I don't think their is way to reduce CTE's, even in older times when players were lighter and slower they had mental issues and died earlier than normal people, we just did not know it is CTE.

Some suggested having players play with less padding and leather helmets again so players don't hit each other so hard and that may actually help but it's not going to eliminate CTE's from the game.

I expect the game to dwindle down due to this. I love football but I'd never let my son play after all the studies released that even kids playing football end up with CTE's.

Over time kids will choose or be directed to play in other sports and this will impact the quality of players that reach the NFL and then combined with further stigma towards CTE's the game will certainly diminish in popularity.

 

Edited by MAD597
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Make youth leagues up until high school age flag football.

Fines penalties ejections for helmet to helmet hits. Enforce them strictly.

Add 2 extra bye weeks during the season so that fatigue isn't as much of a factor. Tired players have bad technique.

Better helmets., better turf? Extra layer of padding under turf?

Teach rugby tackling.

 

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There is a new helmet available that absorbs much more of the force from impacts.  I believe Alex Smith uses one.  Several colleges have adopted it.  You can tell the difference from regular helmets because it has a larger profile and vents at strategic locations.  It has been proven to be effective.

Alex Smith is one of the first NFL players wearing a revolutionary new helmet designed to reduce concussions

Cork Gaines, provided by
article_header.gif

Published 9:05 pm, Thursday, September 7, 2017
Kansas City Chiefs quarterback Alex Smith is one of the first players using a new helmet that is like nothing seen in the NFL before.

The Chiefs took on the New England Patriots in the season opener and many people noted the new oversized helmet being worn by Smith. That is the new Vicis Zero1, a helmet that is new to the NFL this season but is already considered the safest helmet in the NFL.

Alex SmithSteven Senne/AP

Here are the helmets Smith wore in 2016.

Alex SmithAndy Lyons; Grant Halverson/Getty Images

The helmet is made by Vicis, a Seattle-based startup. According to Inc., 25 NFL teams and "at least" 20 college football teams have ordered the helmets for the 2017 season.

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3 minutes ago, BAMF said:

There is a new helmet available that absorbs much more of the force from impacts.  I believe Alex Smith uses one.  Several colleges have adopted it.  You can tell the difference from regular helmets because it has a larger profile and vents at strategic locations.  It has been proven to be effective.

Alex Smith is one of the first NFL players wearing a revolutionary new helmet designed to reduce concussions

 

Cork Gaines, provided by
article_header.gif

 

Published 9:05 pm, Thursday, September 7, 2017
Kansas City Chiefs quarterback Alex Smith is one of the first players using a new helmet that is like nothing seen in the NFL before.

The Chiefs took on the New England Patriots in the season opener and many people noted the new oversized helmet being worn by Smith. That is the new Vicis Zero1, a helmet that is new to the NFL this season but is already considered the safest helmet in the NFL.

Alex SmithSteven Senne/AP

Here are the helmets Smith wore in 2016.

Alex SmithAndy Lyons; Grant Halverson/Getty Images

The helmet is made by Vicis, a Seattle-based startup. According to Inc., 25 NFL teams and "at least" 20 college football teams have ordered the helmets for the 2017 season.

I was about to post the same thing!!  Its the equipment.  The helmet is technically the same for the last 40 years and no one was concerned about this, especially the NFL.  I feel that extensive research needs to be put into the equipment the players wear for safety.  What happen to neck restraints in football? You used to see more neck rolls, cowboy collars and straps to keep guys from ducking their head but you do not see them any more.  I think this new helmet is a step in the right direction, but more research needs to be done.  With carbon fiber and other materials out there now, you cannot tell me there isn't a better helmet design for a player to keep them safe.

With that being said, there are some concussions you are not going to stop and that is the danger of playing football.  I suffered three reported concussions in high school and college and none of them were making a tackle.  Got kicked in the back of the head on a punt block (HS), blocking on a kickoff return (C) and a down block form tackle to NG on a sweep (C).  Those are the ones I know of.  I don't know how many I had overall when I read what a concussion is today, but I feel like after most games I showed signs of a concussion.  I can't remember (CTE?) how many times in practice I got knocked 'koo-koo' but that is a low grade concussion that no one talked about when I played.  You were not considered 'tough' if you missed time from practice over getting knocked  crazy.

Anywho, as long as they are paying millions to play the game, you are going to have people to take the risk.  People get paid less doing more dangerous jobs that playing football (crabbing). GET BETTER EQUIPMENT TO PROTECT THE PLAYERS NFLPA!!!  Are you not concerned about working conditions for your members?

side note:  My most famous football alums (i didn't play there when they did) are Malcolm Butler and Tyreek Hill and I am proud of those guys!!!!

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I've always said, remove artificial turf.. there is only about an inch of padding between turf and concrete.. at least grass and dirt will provide a better absorption when hitting the ground. Also, softer helmets.. You want to try and soften the blow of the brain hitting the skull... with harder helmets there is not give, making the brain hit the skull harder.   Lastly and maybe a bit more unconventional.. remove the facemask, and replace with eye shield..especially for lineman, this will make players more reluctant to use their head, and more apt to use hands................. As much as I love football, I'm really concerned about the future of it, if they dont come up with ways to better protect the players.... You are already seeing players getting a couple of years of nice paydays, and then retiring.  I think you will see more of that

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7 hours ago, kiwifalcon said:

For football players there needs to be better technique around contact.

Tackling is a start getting your head out of the way of forearms knees hips is a good start.

I been a huge proponent for rugby style tackling on here for years.Anything that keeps the head away from an unnecessary contact is a good start.

Yep. Must "attempt to wrap."

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Hopefully these new "flexible" helmets will help. 

It's kinda like Nascar was. They kept making cars more and more rigid, but when hitting a cement wall, something had to give. The driver was absorbing that impact/energy. They now use walls that give/absorb like a car bumper and hopefully these new helmets will be similar.

 

 

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2 hours ago, MAD597 said:

I don't think their is way to reduce CTE's, even in older times when players were lighter and slower they had mental issues and died earlier than normal people, we just did not know it is CTE.

Some suggested having players play with less padding and leather helmets again so players don't hit each other so hard and that may actually help but it's not going to eliminate CTE's from the game.

I expect the game to dwindle down due to this. I love football but I'd never let my son play after all the studies released that even kids playing football end up with CTE's.

Over time kids will choose or be directed to play in other sports and this will impact the quality of players that reach the NFL and then combined with further stigma towards CTE's the game will certainly diminish in popularity.

 

I agree.  There will come a day that we will see the NFL go the way of Sears and Kodak.  

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