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Zaphod

Why are some of y'all so mad at Kap?

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4 hours ago, The Great American said:

Image result for police appreciation meme

Here's a thought I can really get behind!!!  

 

I have no problem with walking in the shoes of anyone that has a particular perspective.  I also believe in accountability and not mincing words / facts.  Most people that have an interaction with police don't want a negative experience.  They are not looking to kill, attack or injure.  They are not looking to go to jail or end up with a ticket.  It amazes me how the system says an officer can "fear for his life" and it not have to be justified in anyway.  Especially when he is initiating contact.  A citizen for some reason doesn't have the same consideration for some reason.  The regulations around how officers police need to change.  

Edited by isproab
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4 hours ago, The Great American said:

Image result for police appreciation meme

Here's a thought I can really get behind!!!  

 

You honestly sympathize with Aaron Dean don't you? You really wish people would shut up about the bad LEOs because most aren't accused of criminal behavior. What if it was your wife who was shot in your home instead of Atatiana Jefferson or your son who was murdered instead of Botham Jean? Would you still be shining those badges so intently?

 

 

 

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47 minutes ago, WhenFalconsWin said:

A great man who happened to be a great football player.

I've purchased one Falcon's jersey in the past 15 years and guess whose it was?  Yepper!!  Mr. Dunn!  

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36 minutes ago, The Great American said:

I've purchased one Falcon's jersey in the past 15 years and guess whose it was?  Yepper!!  Mr. Dunn!  

Yup 

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The end result of ignoring bad policing:

 

 Everybody is not cut out for the stress and I have no doubt PTSD is manifested via overly aggressive behavior. When it appears, it needs to be investigated for the public's safety and the officer's well being. If you really support the police, you should support constant training, mental health services for them and the removal of those who are not fit.

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4 hours ago, The Great American said:

Too many: 144 cops killed on duty in 2018Image result for cops killed in 2018

 

 

 

You're aware that half of those died by car crashes, right? More than half of the cops killed in car crashes were not wearing seatbelts. To be sure, it is a tragedy when a cop is killed on duty, regardless of the circumstance. If I can attest to that, you should be able to admit that it is a tragedy when an unprofessional cop kills without cause while in uniform.

But I don't expect you to.

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Cody Gregg was cruising through an industrial neighborhood southwest of downtown Oklahoma City on Aug. 12 when police spotted him. It was around 10:30 p.m., according to a probable cause affidavit obtained by the Oklahoman, and the officers noticed that the shirtless, backpack-clad homeless man didn’t have any rear lights on his bicycle. They tried to stop him, but he only pedaled harder, ditching the bike after about three blocks and running away on foot.

When they finally caught up to Gregg and demanded to search his backpack, they found a large clear plastic bag of white powder stuffed in a coffee can.

Police concluded that the substance was cocaine and charged Gregg with a felony. Last week, after spending nearly two months in jail, the 29-year-old pleaded guilty to cocaine possession with the intent to distribute, and was sentenced to 15 years in prison. But on Thursday, just two days after learning his fate, Gregg was back in court, this time to withdraw his guilty plea. The lab tests had come back, and they showed that the suspicious-looking white substance was powdered milk, the Oklahoman reported.

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According to the paper, Gregg told the judge that he got the milk from a food pantry. He said that he entered a guilty plea only so that he could stop languishing in Oklahoma County Jail, which has been plagued with issues including overcrowding, chronic mold and an unusually high suicide rate for decades.

On Friday, the case was dismissed and Gregg was released.

The Oklahoma City Police Department told The Washington Post on Wednesday that police tested the white powder with color-changing drug tests that contain the chemicals cobalt thiocyanate and Marquis reagents. In the probable cause affidavit obtained by the Oklahoman, an officer wrote that the baggie contained “a large amount of white powder substance that I believed to be cocaine based on my training and experience,” and that the powder “later tested positive for cocaine and was a total package weight of 45.91 grams of cocaine.”

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It’s not the first time that a harmless household staple has been incorrectly categorized as an illicit drug. In 2016, the New York Times magazine and ProPublica revealed that tens of thousands of people nationwide were being jailed each year based on the results of finicky roadside drug tests that frequently produced false positives. Often, the tests were responding to environmental factors like the weather, and cobalt thiocyanate, in particular, can be affected by the presence of chemicals found in household cleaners. In some instances, police simply didn’t understand how to use them correctly.

As The Washington Post’s Radley Balko wrote last year, the list of innocent items that have been misidentified as dangerous drugs includes chocolate chip cookies, breath mints and the glaze from a Krispy Kreme doughnut. Despite growing awareness that the tests have a high error rate — some studies have found that they result in false positives a fifth or even a third of the time — many police departments continue to rely on them.

At the time of his Aug. 12 arrest, Gregg was on probation. Court records show he had been arrested on drug-related charges at least three times since 2014, and had previously pleaded guilty to possessing marijuana, methamphetamine and drug paraphernalia. In at least one instance, the costs of his incarceration were waived because of mental illness.

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1 minute ago, notthatcool said:

Cody Gregg was cruising through an industrial neighborhood southwest of downtown Oklahoma City on Aug. 12 when police spotted him. It was around 10:30 p.m., according to a probable cause affidavit obtained by the Oklahoman, and the officers noticed that the shirtless, backpack-clad homeless man didn’t have any rear lights on his bicycle. They tried to stop him, but he only pedaled harder, ditching the bike after about three blocks and running away on foot.

When they finally caught up to Gregg and demanded to search his backpack, they found a large clear plastic bag of white powder stuffed in a coffee can.

Police concluded that the substance was cocaine and charged Gregg with a felony. Last week, after spending nearly two months in jail, the 29-year-old pleaded guilty to cocaine possession with the intent to distribute, and was sentenced to 15 years in prison. But on Thursday, just two days after learning his fate, Gregg was back in court, this time to withdraw his guilty plea. The lab tests had come back, and they showed that the suspicious-looking white substance was powdered milk, the Oklahoman reported.

According to the paper, Gregg told the judge that he got the milk from a food pantry. He said that he entered a guilty plea only so that he could stop languishing in Oklahoma County Jail, which has been plagued with issues including overcrowding, chronic mold and an unusually high suicide rate for decades.

On Friday, the case was dismissed and Gregg was released.

15 years. There had to have been 50 huge red flags that this prosecution was BS but it still went full steam ahead. Wonder how many threats of life in prison he heard before he caved? Blue lies matter.

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3 minutes ago, notthatcool said:

It was his 4th drug charge in 5 years.  And he plead guilty to possession with intent to distribute.  

Makes me wonder about the facts of the other cases. He is a geeker and probably mentally ill. You could pin anything on him if you chose to.

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12 minutes ago, JayOzOne said:

Makes me wonder about the facts of the other cases. He is a geeker and probably mentally ill. You could pin anything on him if you chose to.

Not sure if you read the article or just the misleading twitter headline to further their agenda.

He tried to avoid the cops, fled on foot, had multiple drug arrests, a history or mental illness, plead guilty so he didn't have to stay at the crap hole County jail (in a nut shell).  

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1 minute ago, notthatcool said:

Not sure if you read the article or just the misleading twitter headline to further their agenda.

He tried to avoid the cops, fled on foot, had multiple drug arrests, a history or mental illness, plead guilty so he didn't have to stay at the crap hole County jail (in a nut shell).  

I read the whole article. He was convicted after he pled guilty. Which he did after being incorrectly that the powdered milk he was given at the shelter was actually cocaine. He can suffer any consequences for being on probation and avoiding the cops but the punishment was probably NOT 15 years in the cooler. I surmise he took 15 years because 25 was on the table.

BTW: How can you be both homeless and on probation? Something seems wrong with that. How the heck do you keep tabs of a homeless person?

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