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Why are some of y'all so mad at Kap?

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4 hours ago, JayOzOne said:

 

I read up on this because I thought WTF? 200 books were removed for being divisive, all but 14 books have been returned after a hearing on the matter was held. The last 14 books are under review and a determination on there being put back on the shelves will soon be made. 

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1 hour ago, WhenFalconsWin said:

I read up on this because I thought WTF? 200 books were removed for being divisive, all but 14 books have been returned after a hearing on the matter was held. The last 14 books are under review and a determination on there being put back on the shelves will soon be made. 

The point is that once again, Big Brother made a subjective decision according to his worldview. It's my presumption that the corrections lieutenant who first raised an issue is neither a literary scholar nor an expert on social science. But I could be wrong. That presumptive worldview is the problem, though. On both sides.

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Fix the culture. There are a lot of cops with PTSD and other mental health issues. These undoubtedly manifest themselves in contentious public interactions. Instead of offering the cop the help he or she needs to overome these obstacles, they cover for themselves to the detriment of the populace and often times, themselves. It's not uncivil to admit it.

 

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'The ultimate sacrifice': Officer killed in line of duty leaving behind 2 daughters, fiancé

https://abcnews.go.com/US/alabama-police-officer-killed-line-duty/story?id=65659059

"In our community, our heroes wear the police uniform of the Tuscaloosa Police Department," Maddox said at a press conference. "And tonight, one of our heroes has died in the line of duty, protecting our city,"

“He was a great officer," the interim police chief told reporters. "Everybody loved him.”

 

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It’s a sad fact that in today’s society, people only see the police when they’re in the middle of a crisis or when they themselves are pulled over for a traffic infraction or drinking and driving. It can create a negative view of law enforcement in general, and the media doesn’t always help with the perception of police either.

News reports on TV, radio, and in newspapers will often cover bad news before they cover good news, and police are part of this coverage because they’re required to be present when these negative situations unfold. Part of their daily job is to put their lives on the line at standoffs, ask people to submit to breathalyzer tests, and contacting families after drunk driving crashes.

But if you do a little digging and look beyond the media coverage, you’ll see that the police also enjoy doing a lot of heartwarming things as often as they can. Simple random acts of kindness that don’t get media coverage are part of a normal day for a police officer – from picking up teddy bears on the highway and finding the owner, taking care of injured animals, and buying food or providing clothing for cold and hungry people.

 

http://www.guardianinterlock.com/blog/tis-season-recognize-good-deeds-done-police/

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2 hours ago, The Great American said:

It’s a sad fact that in today’s society, people only see the police when they’re in the middle of a crisis or when they themselves are pulled over for a traffic infraction or drinking and driving. It can create a negative view of law enforcement in general, and the media doesn’t always help with the perception of police either.

News reports on TV, radio, and in newspapers will often cover bad news before they cover good news, and police are part of this coverage because they’re required to be present when these negative situations unfold. Part of their daily job is to put their lives on the line at standoffs, ask people to submit to breathalyzer tests, and contacting families after drunk driving crashes.

But if you do a little digging and look beyond the media coverage, you’ll see that the police also enjoy doing a lot of heartwarming things as often as they can. Simple random acts of kindness that don’t get media coverage are part of a normal day for a police officer – from picking up teddy bears on the highway and finding the owner, taking care of injured animals, and buying food or providing clothing for cold and hungry people.

 

http://www.guardianinterlock.com/blog/tis-season-recognize-good-deeds-done-police/

Absolutely incorrect. People have a right to expect the cops to do the right thing. A working definition for "news" is media coverage of unusual events. With that being said, the accounts of inappropriate behavior by cops does not reflect how hundreds of thousands of them do their jobs every day. The only thing that people like me ask is that there be an accounting for when things go wrong. Several posters have checked some of the articles I've posted and when it's shown that the cops were in the right, they've let me know and I've acknowledged it. Mistakes happen, in the performance of the job or in how it has been reported and I am fully aware of that.

I've known cops and other LEOs and don't see them to be monsters. I've been very close to many. I'm more worried that the incident of PTSD is a cause as to why cops have a higher suicide rate than other occupations. They also have a higher rate of substance and spousal abuse. Common sense would seem to indicate that if they have a higher number of manifested mental health problems, it's because of the job. It's shocking that nobody ties these symptoms into dangerous public interactions while on the job. Covering up for them doesn't help anyone.

The problem that I have is that every occupation has a failure rate. Cops are human beings and like all of us, they make mistakes; often with tragic consequences. Law enforcement seems to be the only job that does not evaluate failure to institute best practices and give the public confidence that corrections have been made. Instead of trying to make sure it doesn't happen again, LEOs rally around cops who have the most agregious incidents, even to the point that they will run a cop off the force if he testifies against his brother-in-blue.

This is not rocket science. It's all about making sure that if a cop steps over the line, he's not protected at the expense of either the public trust in policing or the public dole in the form of settlements. If I need help, I will call the cops and expect them to treat me professionally. I'm not sure what you expect but I certainly hope you get their best.

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18 hours ago, JayOzOne said:

Absolutely incorrect. People have a right to expect the cops to do the right thing. A working definition for "news" is media coverage of unusual events. With that being said, the accounts of inappropriate behavior by cops does not reflect how hundreds of thousands of them do their jobs every day. The only thing that people like me ask is that there be an accounting for when things go wrong. Several posters have checked some of the articles I've posted and when it's shown that the cops were in the right, they've let me know and I've acknowledged it. Mistakes happen, in the performance of the job or in how it has been reported and I am fully aware of that.

I've known cops and other LEOs and don't see them to be monsters. I've been very close to many. I'm more worried that the incident of PTSD is a cause as to why cops have a higher suicide rate than other occupations. They also have a higher rate of substance and spousal abuse. Common sense would seem to indicate that if they have a higher number of manifested mental health problems, it's because of the job. It's shocking that nobody ties these symptoms into dangerous public interactions while on the job. Covering up for them doesn't help anyone.

The problem that I have is that every occupation has a failure rate. Cops are human beings and like all of us, they make mistakes; often with tragic consequences. Law enforcement seems to be the only job that does not evaluate failure to institute best practices and give the public confidence that corrections have been made. Instead of trying to make sure it doesn't happen again, LEOs rally around cops who have the most agregious incidents, even to the point that they will run a cop off the force if he testifies against his brother-in-blue.

This is not rocket science. It's all about making sure that if a cop steps over the line, he's not protected at the expense of either the public trust in policing or the public dole in the form of settlements. If I need help, I will call the cops and expect them to treat me professionally. I'm not sure what you expect but I certainly hope you get their best.

I have to back you up on this.  I think police have a job to do, a tough job.  Just because your job is tough doesn't mean that you get "carte blanche."  I saw the story earlier this week where 3 masked teens attempted to rob someone in the metro area around 4am.  The homeowner had a gun and shot all 3.  The teens were all injured and died.  The local media interviewed another group of teens and they mentioned how they were related to the 3 teens that were committing the robbery.  The teens that were interviewed said on camera something to the affect of "he didn't have to shoot them like that, 5 shots was too many, maybe shoot 1 time."

Almost every person that commented on this story said without a doubt, the teens interview after this shooting were wrong.  You can't defend people that are in the middle of committing a crime.  Sorry that they died and you lost family/friends, but they were committing a crime and had a weapon of their own.  In a lot of cases, I hear the "Fraternal Order of Police" or the local "Police Union" come out in support of officers that behave badly.  To me, these organization are no different that the group of teens interviewed in Rockdale county after this incident.  You can not excuse or support bad behavior.  You may not pile on, but you don't have to say anything or can "reserve judgement/statements" until details come out.

Funny in our society how its said that millennials are entitled or politicians think they are above the law/constitution.  We talk about young people that have a false sense of who they are because parents will always defend them when it comes to dealing with teacher and consequences of their actions.  I can't for the life of me understand why some in society want to give bad behaving police officers a pass.  Even when they go against policy/procedure and someone dies.  In my book, no accountability = corruption.  These same supports of bad police officers will talk negatively about anyone that mentions "gun control" or stronger backgroud checks.  They say its an infringement on our rights.  For some reason, police that will beat or kill someone over a situation that should have ended in a ticket isn't an infringement on our rights.  Detaining and cuffing someone for coming down stairs to answer the door after their burglar alarm went off isn't an infringement.  An intelligent person can ask questions without placing someone in cuffs and escalating a situation.

Again, I know police have a hard job, its a dangerous job.  They just want to go home at the end of a shift.  The majority of people that come in contact with police on a daily basis just want to go home and be left alone.  A lot of them have committed no crime and present no threat.  

Edited by isproab
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9 hours ago, isproab said:

I have to back you up on this.  I think police have a job to do, a tough job.  Just because your job is tough doesn't mean that you get "carte blanche."  I saw the story earlier this week where 3 masked teens attempted to rob someone in the metro area around 4am.  The homeowner had a gun and shot all 3.  The teens were all injured and died.  The local media interviewed another group of teens and they mentioned how they were related to the 3 teens that were committing the robbery.  The teens that were interviewed said on camera something to the affect of "he didn't have to shoot them like that, 5 shots was too many, maybe shoot 1 time."

Almost every person that commented on this story said without a doubt, the teens interview after this shooting were wrong.  You can't defend people that are in the middle of committing a crime.  Sorry that they died and you lost family/friends, but they were committing a crime and had a weapon of their own.  In a lot of cases, I hear the "Fraternal Order of Police" or the local "Police Union" come out in support of officers that behave badly.  To me, these organization are no different that the group of teens interviewed in Rockdale county after this incident.  You can not excuse or support bad behavior.  You may not pile on, but you don't have to say anything or can "reserve judgement/statements" until details come out.

Funny in our society how its said that millennials are entitled or politicians think they are above the law/constitution.  We talk about young people that have a false sense of who they are because parents will always defend them when it comes to dealing with teacher and consequences of their actions.  I can't for the life of me understand why some in society want to give bad behaving police officers a pass.  Even when they go against policy/procedure and someone dies.  In my book, no accountability = corruption.  These same supports of bad police officers will talk negatively about anyone that mentions "gun control" or stronger backgroud checks.  They say its an infringement on our rights.  For some reason, police that will beat or kill someone over a situation that should have ended in a ticket isn't an infringement on our rights.  Detaining and cuffing someone for coming down stairs to answer the door after their burglar alarm went off isn't an infringement.  An intelligent person can ask questions without placing someone in cuffs and escalating a situation.

Again, I know police have a hard job, its a dangerous job.  They just want to go home at the end of a shift.  The majority of people that come in contact with police on a daily basis just want to go home and be left alone.  A lot of them have committed no crime and present no threat.  

Thank you. I agee with everything that you wrote. Everybody is not cut out for every job. It flies in the face of law enforcement when unfit LEOs are given license to perform their jobs poorly with the knowledge that their brothers-in-blue are going to look the other way. I have zero sympathy for someone who is killed in the commission of a crime. With that being said, chasing a suspect for a petty crime and shooting him in the back is wrong. I sometimes tell folks that I no longer believe in "good" cops because a cop who tries to do the right thing when the perpetrator is a fellow cop is actually a former cop, not a good one. There are cops and bad cops. We need to empower those who hold their fellow officers to the same standard to which they hold the public.

With that being said, there are groups of LEOs (like St. Louis' Ethical Society of Police) who actually do try to clean up their departments, so it's unfair to paint them all with the same brush.

 

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I'm all for the police doing their jobs better and doing it equitable between the rich and the poor.  But if we were really concerned with the minorities and poor we would be also be taking a closer look at the medical malpractice that they endure.  WAY more minorities and poor are dying because of doctors who blow them off or give them sub standard medical attention versus the way they are treated by police.  And I'm not talking about health insurance.  I'm talking blatant malpractice.  

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Police officer’s good deed gives man a new set of wheels

https://nypost.com/2017/07/06/police-officers-good-deed-gives-man-a-new-set-of-wheels/

A Florida police officer is being praised for helping a resident after he spotted the man riding a bike with only one functioning tire.

Jacksonville police officer Terrance Hightower was patrolling a neighborhood when he spotted the man riding along the street, the department wrote on Facebook Thursday morning. The man only had one tire in the front, with the rubber completely stripped away in the back.

Hightower went to the store and bought two new mountain bike tires for the man. He later showed up at the man’s home and surprised him with the gift.

 

 

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