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atlbaby

10 yard split and pass rushers

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The more and more I think about it I believe we will take either one of these guys Derek Rivers or Jordan Willis with our first pick.

Quinn evaluation on pass rusher:

Quote

The first thing when you're talking about pass rush, you're talking about get-off. That's one of the things when you're evaluating the guys, 'OK, let's look at the get-off and does he have the quickness to get off the spot?' As a rusher, can you get the tackle off the spot to get them to move. So I really think you look for that speed and quickness first. I try to look at as many of the guys on the roster as I could to see what unique stuff they have. Then our job is to pull that out of them and see what they can do. It's a big topic, and one that's right at the forefront of our discussions."

NFL scout on 10 yard split:

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One of the most important and consistently overlooked measurements at the combine is the first 10 yards of the 40, known as the 10-yard split. This is simply a measurement to see how fast a prospect can cover the first 10 yards of their 40. It’s great to see how fast someone can run 40 yards, but how often in an NFL game are players required to cover that distance on one play? A more reasonable measurement, and a better indicator of “football speed,” is 10 yards.

A 10-yard split not only measures the short-area burst of an NFL prospect and but also allows evaluators to determine if the prospect is a two-stepper (a player who can get up to full speed in two steps) or a strider (a player who needs to hit full stride to reach his top speed). Since football players as a whole are consistently forced to quickly explode in and out of their breaks throughout the game and change directions, short-area explosion (typically within 10 yards) is a pivotal reflection of a player’s overall “football speed.”

The 10-yard split is a vital time gauge for every position in the NFL, but it’s arguably more important for edge pass rushers than at any other spot. Pure pass rushing specialists who rely on their first step to gain an advantage on offensive tackles need to display explosive first-step quickness out of the stance. So the timing of a pass rusher’s 10-yard split is an excellent indicator of how quickly he can explode off the ball and cover the ground needed to get after the quarterback.

 

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What was said about the 2011 draft prospects before they was drafted.

Funny how two of Quinn's LEO's made the top DE/OLB 10 yard split list.

Derek Rivers 1.61 (10-YD split)

Jordan Willis 1.54 (10-YD split)

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Martez Wilson, Illinois: 1.59
His initial first step is one of the biggest reasons why I think he has the potential to rush off the edge as a 34 OLB. He’s long armed, has some pass rush ability and with that initial first step, he can at least threaten the corner until he develops more of a pass rush arsenal

Von Miller, Texas A&M: 1.62
Simply by watching Miller on tape, it’s no surprise that he possesses one of the fastest ten-yard splits of any pass-rushing prospect in the draft. He’s a guy who opposing tackles will need to consistently account for turning the corner at the next level. However, it’s his fluidity and change of directions skills off his speed rush that ultimately will make him an even tougher block in the NFL.

Brooks Reed, Arizona: 1.63
Again, when you watch the tape you know Reed depends mostly on his first step. He’s a guy who gets off the ball quickly and has developed a nifty spin to counter. However, he’s tight hipped and looks linear as a pass rusher. Strikes me more as a one trick pony at this stage, which will limit him.

Justin Houston, Georgia: 1.66
Houston is similar to Reed, whereas he possesses a good initial burst off the snap and can consistently threaten. Now, he’s a bit more fluid than Reed on tape. However, he isn’t the most flexible of guys around the edge and has yet to really develop much of a counter off his speed rush.

Adrian Clayborn, Iowa: 1.67
For a 6-3, 285-pound lineman, 1.67 is an impressive time. Clayborn possesses a good first step off the ball, as well as impressive short area quickness and burst when asked to close for a guy his size. He definitely plays faster than his frame would indicate because of his natural explosion/quickness in tight quarters

Aldon Smith, Missouri: 1.68
Smith is a tall, long armed defensive lineman who takes a bit more to coil up into his stance. However, for a long prospect he possesses a good first step, natural bend and has the ability to at least threaten the edge and than work off his counter. His speed rush isn’t elite by NFL standards, but it’s certainly enough to keep tackles off balance, flatten out with along the edge and counter off.

Jabaal Sheard, Pittsburgh: 1.68
Sheard is one guy who continues to intrigue me. He displayed a better initial get off than I gave him credit for, has a great motor and an intriguing pass rush arsenal. He’ll get looks at both 34 OLB and down as a DE, and is one of the most underrated pass rushers in the draft in my view.

Robert Quinn, North Carolina: 1.69
I never quite understood where the potential 4.55 40 came from in regards of a possible time for Quinn. He’s a long, flexible athlete off the snap who has the get off burst to reach the edge. But when watching him on tape I didn’t think he was an elite speed rusher. I saw a coordinated kid who used his arms/hands well to shed and demonstrated some natural change of direction skills to his game, which would allow him to consistently reach the passer. But in my mind he simply possesses a good, but not elite first step.

Cameron Jordan, California: 1.71
Jordan is more of a sudden/quicker pass rusher who knows how to set up his rush and use his length to keep himself clean. However, simply trying to turn the corner vs. NFL caliber offensive tackles will never be among his strong suits.

J.J. Watt, Wisconsin: 1.71
About what I expected on tape from Watt as the former Wisconsin standout isn’t a speed rusher. He’s a powerful kid who can play with leverage for his size, get under blockers and shed

Akeem Ayers, UCLA: 1.72
Plays faster on tape and I’m going to be interested to see exactly what he runs at his pro day. Putting in the necessary work could be the issue and not physical talent when it comes to his Combine/pro day numbers.

Ryan Kerrigan, Purdue: 1.72
Again, not exactly a speed rusher who is going to consistently threaten the corner at the next level. He’s a high motor guy on tape who plays heavy handed and can fend off blocks. But, if you’re looking for an out and out speed rusher, Kerrigan isn’t your guy.

 

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Some other notable prospects split times:

* we worked out

Tarell Basham 1.61

Daeshon Hall 1.67

Charles Harris 1.65

Trey Hendrickson 1.59

*Tanoh Kpassagnon 1.69

Carl Lawson 1.60

Malik McDowell 1.69

Takkarist McKinley 1.61

*Avery Moss 1.67

Ifeadi Odenigbo 1.66

Carroll Philips 1.64

Ejuan Price 1.66

*Haason Reddick 1.59

Tim Williams 1.64

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Man that 2011 class was ridiculous.

10 yard split is very important...the problem comes in trying to tell how much has to do with people learning proper track techniques and starting positions vs actual explosion.  I wish everyone ran the 40 out of a standard (football) stance.

Good info though, and yeah, the last 30 yards don't mean too much.  It's 3 cone and 10 splits and things that show quick explosion.

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That or we trade up for Reddick. I could honestly see it going either way at this point, but the latter will ultimately depend on a combination of how much Quinn crushes on Reddick, how far he falls, and how much the cost would be.

Ultimately, I'm more inclined to think that we stay put unless we can trade up for fairly cheap, as I think that Quinn really values picks, and hates the idea of losing another chance to develop another prospect.

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9 hours ago, atlbaby said:

Some other notable prospects split times:

* we worked out

Tarell Basham 1.61

Daeshon Hall 1.67

Charles Harris 1.65

Trey Hendrickson 1.59

*Tanoh Kpassagnon 1.69

Carl Lawson 1.60

Malik McDowell 1.69

Takkarist McKinley 1.61

*Avery Moss 1.67

Ifeadi Odenigbo 1.66

Carroll Philips 1.64

Ejuan Price 1.66

*Haason Reddick 1.59

Tim Williams 1.64

My 2 favourites Lawson and Reddick 59,60 right there in the get off stakes.

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