Jump to content

Let's Play Running back -- You Make The Read


Recommended Posts

With the season coming to an end, I thought it might be fun to start putting together some of this stuff we've been talking about over the season in a first person point of view kinda deal.

Now as most of you know, the Falcons are a zone running team.  Of course they do a little more than that, but the bread and butter is the zone.  What is so cool about zone running is that it's simple yet tough to defend because if the runner makes the correct read, he can almost always make the defense wrong.  

I thought we'd look at a few plays and you can kind of get a feel for reading it yourself at full speed.

THIS IS YOUR READ RUNNERS!  THE YELLOW CIRCLE! 

The aiming point is the outside hip of the guard.  That's where the play is supposed to go, but when you get the ball, you are reading the playside defensive tackle.  Vs a 3-4 team it may be a defensive end as it is here.

PLAY#1: No fullback.  Inside zone split.  #81 is going to wind back and look for a kickout block to create a possible cutback lane.  But you are the runner.  Your read is the same.  Playside tackle, or end if it's a 3-4.  That's your read.  He crashes inside to #65, you bounce outside to the next open gap.  He crashes outside, you cut it back and look for a lane.  Now sometimes vs. this front, the coach may actually have you read the nose and sometimes the linebacker, but I'm trying to keep this simple.

IMG_1654_zpstticxfkh.jpg

 

Play #2 from the 49er game.  It's an inside zone play off of a pitch.  The pitch can kind of throw you off but, that's to eff with the defense, get them thinking it's a sweep.  The play is a zone.

The aiming point is the outside hip of the guard.  Remember the read.  If yellow circle crashes down towards the guard #65, you bounce the play outside.  If he holds his ground or pushes outside, then you cut it up inside if him.  The beauty of this type of split/lead where the fullback leads opposite the run, is there is a built-in cutback.

IMG_1655_zpse434axeh.jpg

 

PLAY 3: Same play.  Inside zone split, this time with Tevin in the backfield.  Same aiming point.  Outside hip of the guard.  This time the 9ers are in more of a true over front, so the defensive end it actually playing more like a 3-tech defensive tackle.  Same read.  You cut off of him.

IMG_1656_zpsmrapd8hp.jpg

 

OKAY!  EVERYBODY GOT ALL THAT?  Good... here are the actual plays back-to-back-to-back.  You know the reads, you know where your eyes need to be, see if you can make the decisions in real time.  

Remember.  Play #1: inside zone right.  Play #2, inside zone to the left.  Play #3 inside zone to the left with Coleman.  Ready?  Go!  And remember, you do not predetermine your cut.  That's where some runners struggle with this scheme.  You cannot predetermine your cut.  You have to read.

 

Edited by PeytonMannings Forehead
Link to comment
Share on other sites

As a bonus, here is an outside zone.  Now the blocking is a little funny here, it doesn't look like a true outside zone where the linemen turn and almost start running toward the sideline.  The Panthers blew up the line and the way it looks, it looks kind of like a slam play.

But for the sake or argument it runs like an outside zone.  Your read this time is the "end man on the line of scrimmage" or EMOL.  Carolina runs a 4-3, so you're reading the defensive end for outside zones.  Same principle: he crashes down, keep going outside, he gets upfield, look for a cutback, but now your aiming point is the outside hip of the tight end.

giphy.gif

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

27 minutes ago, PeytonMannings Forehead said:

As a bonus, here is an outside zone.  Now the blocking is a little funny here, it doesn't look like a true outside zone where the linemen turn and almost start running toward the sideline.  The Panthers blew up the line and the way it looks, it looks kind of like a slam play.

But for the sake or argument it runs like an outside zone.  Your read this time is the "end man on the line of scrimmage" or EMOL.  Carolina runs a 4-3, so you're reading the defensive end for outside zones.  Same principle: he crashes down, keep going outside, he gets upfield, look for a cutback, but now your aiming point is the outside hip of the tight end.

giphy.gif

 

that was a nice run

Link to comment
Share on other sites

31 minutes ago, PeytonMannings Forehead said:

As a bonus, here is an outside zone.  Now the blocking is a little funny here, it doesn't look like a true outside zone where the linemen turn and almost start running toward the sideline.  The Panthers blew up the line and the way it looks, it looks kind of like a slam play.

But for the sake or argument it runs like an outside zone.  Your read this time is the "end man on the line of scrimmage" or EMOL.  Carolina runs a 4-3, so you're reading the defensive end for outside zones.  Same principle: he crashes down, keep going outside, he gets upfield, look for a cutback, but now your aiming point is the outside hip of the tight end.

giphy.gif

 

Holy cow, look at the room he had if he would have cut up field behind Toilolo instead of heading towards the sideline...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, Clark said:

Holy cow, look at the room he had if he would have cut up field behind Toilolo instead of heading towards the sideline...

I thought the same thing until I noticed the safety at the 50. probably would have got about 7 to 10 more yards unless he took a bad angle, then he would have housed it

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just now, Clark said:

Holy cow, look at the room he had if he would have cut up field behind Toilolo instead of heading towards the sideline...

That's one of those things you have to live with in this scheme. The aiming point was to Toilolos outside hip.

The read took him there to the outside. 

Now the reads are strict but once you're past the line of scrimmage then you can do whatever. That's what separates the good runners from the great runners in this scheme... that vision.

Denver with Shanahan was always able to churn out productive runners, but he never found another Terrell Davis.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, PeytonMannings Forehead said:

That's one of those things you have to live with in this scheme. The aiming point was to Toilolos outside hip.

The read took him there to the outside. 

Now the reads are strict but once you're past the line of scrimmage then you can do whatever. That's what separates the good runners from the great runners in this scheme... that vision.

Denver with Shanahan was always able to churn out productive runners, but he never found another Terrell Davis.

i tell you what, once Coleman improves his vision a little bit, watch out.  If we could combine Freeman's vision and shiftiness with Colemans size and speed, he would be a monster.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 minutes ago, PeytonMannings Forehead said:

Whatd you miss or aren't clear on?

By all means, ask away.

So, just play 2 (write up, 1st play in video).

It seemed to me everyone crashed toward 65, as you mention in the set up. The LB came up to contain(?) and a Falcons WR came over to block. You said in the set up that if they crashed toward 65 to bounce it out, but Free cut it all the way back inside... I either missed something or can't read the play for what you wrote...

Also, might be worth noting play 1 write up is play 2 full speed video and vice versa...

Edited by Leggggggo
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, Leggggggo said:

So, just play 2.

It seemed to me everyone crashed toward 65, as you mention in the set up. The LB came up to contain(?) and a Falcons WR came over to block. You said in the set up that if they crashed toward 65 to bounce it out, but Free cut it all the way back inside... I either missed something or can't read the play for what you wrote...

Also, might be worth noting play 1 write up is play 2 full speed video and vice versa...

I had someone in my ear rushing to do something. I'll re arrange the order when i get home.

As far as play 2, you don't look at everyone else, just that playside end. The end got stood up. It was more a stalemate than anything. The read there is to try to keep it between the guard and tackle.

That is if we're talking about the same play. The one with Dimarco blocking right?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just now, PeytonMannings Forehead said:

I had someone in my ear rushing to do something. I'll re arrange the order when i get home.

As far as play 2, you don't look at everyone else, just that playside end. The end got stood up. It was more a stalemate than anything. The read there is to try to keep it between the guard and tackle.

That is if we're talking about the same play. The one with Dimarco blocking right?

no, I did a late edit... The one with Hooper pulling inside after the pre-snap shift.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 minutes ago, Leggggggo said:

no, I did a late edit... The one with Hooper pulling inside after the pre-snap shift.

Okay yeah i see.

That was an outside bounce. He bounced outside of the tackle instead of going inside. He bounced to the next open gap. 

I wasn't clear. You don't bounce all the way outside. You bounce outside the tackles leverage to the next available gap.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

43 minutes ago, Clark said:

i tell you what, once Coleman improves his vision a little bit, watch out.  If we could combine Freeman's vision and shiftiness with Colemans size and speed, he would be a monster.

It's not even his vision. It's his patience. If he was more patient he could hit some creases. He's a cut and go runner. Freeman is a set up his blocks runnner. If Coleman set his blocks up like freeman oh boy. But that's not his game. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, TheFatboi said:

It's not even his vision. It's his patience. If he was more patient he could hit some creases. He's a cut and go runner. Freeman is a set up his blocks runnner. If Coleman set his blocks up like freeman oh boy. But that's not his game. 

You are right.  I have read the comparison between Coleman and Norwood several times and I think I agree.  Norwood was a cut and run type of runner with homerun ability.  He was fun to watch.  Coleman is a better pass catcher than Norwood... lets just hope he is more durable.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 minutes ago, Clark said:

You are right.  I have read the comparison between Coleman and Norwood several times and I think I agree.  Norwood was a cut and run type of runner with homerun ability.  He was fun to watch.  Coleman is a better pass catcher than Norwood... lets just hope he is more durable.

I agree. He and Norwiod are very similar. They even run the same to me. I think Coleman is a little more durable than Norwood tho. More powerful as well. I think Coleman will break off some nice runs in the playoffs tho. I think the run game will be important for us to be successful. I think that's how we catch some teams slipping. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, PeytonMannings Forehead said:

With the season coming to an end, I thought it might be fun to start putting together some of this stuff we've been talking about over the season in a first person point of view kinda deal.

Now as most of you know, the Falcons are a zone running team.  Of course they do a little more than that, but the bread and butter is the zone.  What is so cool about zone running is that it's simple yet tough to defend because if the runner makes the correct read, he can almost always make the defense wrong.  

I thought we'd look at a few plays and you can kind of get a feel for reading it yourself at full speed.

Play #1 from the 49er game.  It's an inside zone play off of a pitch.  The pitch can kind of throw you off but, that's to eff with the defense, get them thinking it's a sweep.  The play is a zone.

THIS IS YOUR READ RUNNERS!  THE YELLOW CIRCLE! 

The aiming point is the outside hip of the guard.  That's where the play is supposed to go, but when you get the ball, you are reading the playside defensive tackle.  Vs a 3-4 team it may be a defensive end as it is here.  If this man crashes down towards the guard #65, you bounce the play outside.  If he holds his ground or pushes outside, then you cut it up inside if him.  The beauty of this type of split/lead, where the fullback leads opposite the run, is there is a built-in cutback.

IMG_1655_zpse434axeh.jpg

 

PLAY#2: No fullback, but the play is the exact same.  Inside-zone split.  #81 is going to wind back and look for a kickout block to create a possible cutback lane.  But you are the runner.  Your read is the same.  Playside tackle, or end if it's a 3-4.  That's your read.  He crashes inside, you bounce outside.  He crashes outside, you back it back and look for a cutback lane.  Now sometimes vs. this front, the coach may actually have you read the nose and sometimes the linebacker, but I'm trying to keep this simple.

IMG_1654_zpstticxfkh.jpg

 

PLAY 3: Same play.  Inside zone split, this time with Tevin in the backfield.  Same aiming point.  Outside hip of the guard.  This time the 9ers are in more of a true over front, so the defensive end it actually playing more like a 3-tech defensive tackle.  Same read.  You cut off of him.

IMG_1656_zpsmrapd8hp.jpg

 

OKAY!  EVERYBODY GOT ALL THAT?  Good... here are the actual plays back-to-back-to-back.  You know the reads, you know where your eyes need to be, see if you can make the decisions in real time.  

Remember.  Play #1: inside zone right.  Play #2, inside zone to the left.  Play #3 inside zone to the left with Coleman.  Ready?  Go!  And remember, you do not predetermine your cut.  That's where some runners struggle with this scheme.  You cannot predetermine your cut.  You have to read.

 

 

looks like a counter toss in the zbs to me

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 minutes ago, TheFatboi said:

I agree. He and Norwiod are very similar. They even run the same to me. I think Coleman is a little more durable than Norwood tho. More powerful as well. I think Coleman will break off some nice runs in the playoffs tho. I think the run game will be important for us to be successful. I think that's how we catch some teams slipping. 

that's one of the reasons I like that we've been passing to set up the run all season. at the same time we are really balanced. we've ran 385 times to 498 pass attempts. Free only has 215 carries and Coleman has 110, Elliott has more than that by himself. our guys are pretty fresh and are ready to pound the rock all play-offs. we're in a position to quick strike teams to death early then put in the big boys and let the 2 headed monster ride the clock.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...