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Former Eagles player and head coach Marion Campbell dies at 87

1:35 AM CT
  • ESPN.com news services

Marion Campbell, a former All-Pro on the Philadelphia Eagles' 1960 championship team who later went on to become their head coach, died Wednesday at the age of 87, the team announced Sunday night.

"Marion Campbell will be missed by the Eagles community but also remembered for his spirited impact on our game," Eagles owner Jeff Lurie said in a statement. "Like Chuck Bednarik, he was a great two-way player during a special era in NFL history. He played with the type of toughness that our town so deeply admires."

A fourth-round draft pick of the San Francisco 49ers in 1952 out of Georgia, Campbell served in the United States Army before embarking on an NFL career that would span eight seasons, two with the 49ers and six with the Eagles.

Nicknamed the "Swamp Fox," Campbell eventually returned to Philadelphia after his playing days were over to serve as defensive coordinator on **** Vermeil's staff, a role he held for six seasons and included a Super Bowl appearance in 1980.

Campbell was later named as Vermeil's successor following the coach's unexpected retirement in 1982. The Eagles went 17-29-1 in Campbell's three seasons at the helm, and he was fired with one game remaining in the 1985 season.

Campbell had two separate head-coaching stints with the Atlanta Falcons, from 1974 until '76 and from 1987-89, before returning to his alma mater, where he served as the Bulldogs' defensive coordinator for the 1993 season.

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1 hour ago, The Falcon Jedi Knight said:

Former Eagles player and head coach Marion Campbell dies at 87

1:35 AM CT
  • ESPN.com news services

Marion Campbell, a former All-Pro on the Philadelphia Eagles' 1960 championship team who later went on to become their head coach, died Wednesday at the age of 87, the team announced Sunday night.

"Marion Campbell will be missed by the Eagles community but also remembered for his spirited impact on our game," Eagles owner Jeff Lurie said in a statement. "Like Chuck Bednarik, he was a great two-way player during a special era in NFL history. He played with the type of toughness that our town so deeply admires."

A fourth-round draft pick of the San Francisco 49ers in 1952 out of Georgia, Campbell served in the United States Army before embarking on an NFL career that would span eight seasons, two with the 49ers and six with the Eagles.

Nicknamed the "Swamp Fox," Campbell eventually returned to Philadelphia after his playing days were over to serve as defensive coordinator on **** Vermeil's staff, a role he held for six seasons and included a Super Bowl appearance in 1980.

Campbell was later named as Vermeil's successor following the coach's unexpected retirement in 1982. The Eagles went 17-29-1 in Campbell's three seasons at the helm, and he was fired with one game remaining in the 1985 season.

Campbell had two separate head-coaching stints with the Atlanta Falcons, from 1974 until '76 and from 1987-89, before returning to his alma mater, where he served as the Bulldogs' defensive coordinator for the 1993 season.

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Thanks

 

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12 minutes ago, putnam6 said:

He was a pretty  d a m n good DC. Old school not to mention anybody that had to work under the Smith's twice deserves some kind of respect. Nobody wanted that HC job his second time around. Rankin had to practically beg him.

You're so right there, Rankin Smith was the worst owner in not only the NFL but all sports teams at the time............ So glad to see Blank here and a wanting to win attitude..........

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2 hours ago, GTBF54 said:

You're so right there, Rankin Smith was the worst owner in not only the NFL but all sports teams at the time............ So glad to see Blank here and a wanting to win attitude..........

Rankin had to have been one of the most complacent owners ever.  He just didn't care one way or the other.  The team was just something to do once a week for him. 

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21 hours ago, Tuggle'2 said:

Rankin had to have been one of the most complacent owners ever.  He just didn't care one way or the other.  The team was just something to do once a week for him. 

What's crazy is when you see their initial investment was I believe around $6,000,000 and what they sold it for to Blank. It was strictly a business investment for the Smith's  and it was ran much like a regular company, always with an eye on the P/L. While thier football knowledge was limited, they made out like bandits business wise.

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On 7/19/2016 at 7:35 PM, putnam6 said:

What's crazy is when you see their initial investment was I believe around $6,000,000 and what they sold it for to Blank. It was strictly a business investment for the Smith's  and it was ran much like a regular company, always with an eye on the P/L. While thier football knowledge was limited, they made out like bandits business wise.

You also have to take into account that we're talking about nearly 40 years of inflation too.

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Sad to hear.

I used to work in Ingles grocery store near Flowery Branch about 7 years ago as a junior in high school. Marion Campbell would go into the store quite frequently. At first I didn't know who he was and then one day he came through my line and I noticed an Eagles Super Bowl ring on his finger so I asked him about it. That's when I knew who he was. Seemed like a nice guy. 

R.I.P. Coach

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4 hours ago, Falconsfan567 said:

You also have to take into account that we're talking about nearly 40 years of inflation too.

Smith's bought the Falcons for $6,000,000, and Sold them for $545,000,000. Thats a little more complex than just "inflation". Not to mention what they cleared every single year they owned the team due too thier spend thrift ways. The TV contracts alone sky rocketed every decade, by the 90's we are talking hundreds of millions in dollars split 32 ways.New franchise in the league the Smith's got thier 1/32 share.

A little cost of living research shows shows about 8-10 times as much in 2001 v.s. 1966. 10 times $6,000,000 is $60,000,000 they made on the sale alone almost 10 times the rate of inflation.  They made out like bandits.....

Cost living 1966

Cost of new house $14,200.00

 Average Income per year $6,900.00 

Gas per Gallon 32 cents 

Average Cost of a new car $2,650.00 

Dishwasher$119.95 

Parker Pen Set $11.95.

 

Cost Of Living 2001

How Much things cost in 2001 

Average Cost of new house  $136,150.00  
Average Median Income $42,350.00 
Average Monthly Rent  $715.00 
Cost of a gallon of Gas $1.46 
Average cost of new car $25,850.00  
US Postage Stamp 34 cents  
1 LB of Bacon $3.22  
Ground Coffee per IB $3.06  
Loaf of Bread $1.82  
Dozen Eggs 90 cents 

 
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2 hours ago, putnam6 said:

Smith's bought the Falcons for $6,000,000, and Sold them for $545,000,000. Thats a little more complex than just "inflation". Not to mention what they cleared every single year they owned the team due too thier spend thrift ways. The TV contracts alone sky rocketed every decade, by the 90's we are talking hundreds of millions in dollars split 32 ways.New franchise in the league the Smith's got thier 1/32 share.

A little cost of living research shows shows about 8-10 times as much in 2001 v.s. 1966. 10 times $6,000,000 is $60,000,000 they made on the sale alone almost 10 times the rate of inflation.  They made out like bandits.....

Cost living 1966

Cost of new house $14,200.00

 Average Income per year $6,900.00 

Gas per Gallon 32 cents 

Average Cost of a new car $2,650.00 

Dishwasher$119.95 

Parker Pen Set $11.95.

 

Cost Of Living 2001

How Much things cost in 2001 

Average Cost of new house  $136,150.00  
Average Median Income $42,350.00 
Average Monthly Rent  $715.00 
Cost of a gallon of Gas $1.46 
Average cost of new car $25,850.00  
US Postage Stamp 34 cents  
1 LB of Bacon $3.22  
Ground Coffee per IB $3.06  
Loaf of Bread $1.82  
Dozen Eggs 90 cents 

 

Smith family came out way ahead of inflation , but alot of that was just luck in investing in the NFL at the right time before it too off in popularity. Actually, if team had been managed effectively, Smith family could have gotten alot more than $545M....at the time Blank purchased team, they were on the lower end of the scale of NFL franchise valuations.......

 

Blank will do well with his investment......

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From what I remember reading Atlanta almost had an AFL franchise, NFL got wind of it, and with the Braves already headed this way and a stadium being built began searching for possible owners. Think it was Sam Masell or whoever was mayor at the time the recommended Rankin Smith. So it did drop in his lap a bit, still somebody had to pony up the 6 mill. Luck and timing are usually part of the equation when a business has financial success. He could have said no, and then maybe the Falcons would possibly started in the AFL. 

Sort of like the luck and timing on the ownership of the Spirits of St.Louis of the ABA.  wanted to join the NBA with the other ABA teams that did merge .

The NBA placated John Y. Brown, owner of the Kentucky Colonels, by giving him a $3.3 million settlement in exchange for shutting his team down. (Brown later used much of that money to buy the Buffalo Braves of the NBA.) But the owners of the Spirits, the brothers Ozzie and Dan Silna, struck a prescient deal to acquire future television money from the teams that joined the NBA, a 1/7 share from each franchise (or nearly 2% of the entire NBA's TV money), in perpetuity. With network TV deals becoming more and more lucrative, the deal has made the Silnas wealthy, earning them $186 million as of 2008, according to the Cleveland Plain Dealer, and $255 million as of 2012 according to The New York Times.[1] (The NBA nearly succeeded in buying out the Silnas in 1982 by offering $5 million over eight years, but negotiations stalled when the siblings demanded $8 million over five.) On June 27, 2007, it was extended for another 8 years, ensuring another $100 million+ windfall for the Silnas. In 2014, the Silnas reached agreement with the NBA to greatly reduce the perpetual payments and take a lump sum of $500 million.[2] In the last few years before the lump sum agreement, the Silnas were receiving $14.57 million a year, despite being owners of a team that hadn't played one minute of basketball in more than 35 years.[3] The Silnas will, however, still be receiving a now much smaller portion of the television revenue through a new partnership with the former ABA teams the Nets, Nuggets, Pacers and Spurs. [4]

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