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Cover 9@9: Which undrafted player is going to make the team?


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OK, it's from DOLt so take it with a huge grain of salt, but there are surprisingly a few nuggets of useful information in here.

http://atlantafalcons.blog.ajc.com/2016/05/11/cover-99-which-undrafted-player-is-going-to-make-the-team/
Cover 9@9: Which undrafted player is going to make the team?
D. Orlando Ledbetter
May 11, 2016

1. Meet J.D. McKissic. Falcons undrafted rookie J.D. McKissic, who played at Arkansas State, has been described as a wide receiver with running back skills by his former coach Gus Malzahn.

McKissic, 5-foot-11, 193 pounds, had a tremendously productive college receiver for the Red Wolves. - He's technically 5'10 1/8".

He played in 49 games and had 289 catches for 2,838 yards and 11 touchdowns. He also returned 54 kickoffs for 1,473 yards and had a 27.3 kickoff return average.

McKissic ranked first in the Sun Belt with a 26.5 yards per kick return average, and ranked 10th with 101.7 all-purpose yards per game in 2015.

McKissic, who recently completed the Falcons rookie minicamp, said that there are three things that fans need to know about him.

“The first thing is that I’ll do anything to get on the field,” McKissic said. “The second thing, is I can play special teams, offense or defense, it doesn’t matter. The third thing is that I do it for the love of the game.”

After his stellar career with the Red Wolves, the Phenix City, Alabama native was hoping to get drafted. Malzahn was his coach in 2012, but McKissic’s production dipped after Malzahn left to become Auburn’s head coach.

“God works in mysterious ways,” McKissic said. “I just try to be destined for greatness. I just work hard at my craft and try to be the best that I can be.

“I’ll try to get anywhere I can on the field. If it was meant for me to get drafted I would have gotten drafted. Therefore, it was meant for me to be a free agent and now, it’s time for me to come in and try to make the team.”

McKissic draws inspiration from his family, including his brother Bryant McKissic, who played safety at Troy.

“I just came up watching the game and I just tried to be like (him),” McKissic said. “Come to find out I have love for the game and just like competing.”

Last season, undrafted players running back Terron Ward, free safety Robenson Therezie and defensive tackle Joey Mbu spent time on the roster.

Falcons middle linebacker Paul Worrlow and right tackle Ryan Schraeder were undrafted players.

With only Julio Jones, Mohamed Sanu and Justin Hardy appearing to be roster locks, perhaps the versatile McKissic can push through and make the roster.

 

McKISSIC’S CAREER RECEIVING STATISTICS

Year      No.       YDS      AVG.     TD        LG

2012     103       1,022    9.9        5          74

2013     82         662       8.1        4          40

2014      52         629       12.1      0           65

2015      52          535        10.1     2         49

Totals  289      2,848        9.8        11

2. Rating the safety position. The Falcons rated their safety position much differently than other teams. They don’t require their safety to cover wide receivers. In part, that explains the different ratings that teams and draft analysts had on first-round pick Keanu Neal. (Hello, people that keep insisting we "reached" even though we don't have the sufficient information to make that conclusion.) 

“When you play a scheme where you feature the safety, which we do, it has a real impact on the ball game,” Falcons coach Dan Quinn said. “That’s why we are thrilled to add Keanu into the mix. The physicality that goes along with the position is one that I have always had a really deep appreciation for and then having the ability to be able to use that for the cover element is a factor.”

Neal will move around in the Falcons’ scheme.

“This strong safety is going to play in the box,” Quinn said. “He’ll look like a linebacker at times. He’ll come up at the end of the line at times. He’ll blitz at times. It’s a different, hybrid guy for us.”

3. Is Jones big enough? Falcons linebacker Deion Jones, the team’s second-round pick, will play between 225 and 230 pounds. Traditionally, that’s a little light for a middle linebacker.

“You have to go way back, we did a big study on that,(some people like to pretend they know better than the front office where Jones can fit in this scheme, as if they don't have a well thought out plan - Quinn finds your lack of faith disturbing) Quinn said. “The era when (Derrick) Brooks and that crew came out, there was the 220-pound and 230-pound guy…I think (Jones) was light (during the pre-draft process) so that he would run fast. He’ll probably play between 225 and 230.”

Jones is not the traditional run-stuffing middle linebacker.

“So much of this game now is nickel,” Quinn said.  “You have to be in space and you have to be able to haul.”

4. Tall linebacker. The Falcons like fourth-round pick De’Vondre Campbell’s length at 6-foot-4.

“It’s what often times makes really good blitzers,” Quinn said. “Because you’re long enough to beat backs. Here’s a 5-9 back and I’m beating him with a swim move. I’m able to be in the quarterback’s face because of my length. I can bat a ball down because of my length whereas the smaller compact guys are really fast, but just being fast doesn’t make you a good blitzer. You have to be able to beat a guy.”

5. Hester update: Falcons returner Devin Hester is attending the offseason program and receiving rehab treatments from trainer Marty Lauzon after offseason foot surgery.

The Falcons are hopeful that he can return over the offseason and before training camp.

“He’s able to do certain things, but he can’t fully do it all,” Quinn said. “I don’t know that I have a timeline for it, but we’re hopeful that it’s prior to camp. But as far as OTAs, I don’t know. That toe has got to be right and we’re not going to put him out there until it is.”

6. Coaching connections. UCLA wide receivers coach Eric Yarber was able to give the Falcons a trusted scouting report on seventh-round pick Devin Fuller. Yarber coached in the NFL for five seasons and was on Falcons assistant head coach Raheem Morris’ staff in Tampa Bay for two seasons.

7. Strongside, Leo crew. During one of the draft shows, Brooks Reed was inaccurately lumped with the Falcons’ middle linebackers.

Quinn noted that Reed is a SAM (strongside) or LEO (hybrid defensive end/weakside) player for the Falcons.

“The guys kind of playing those spots are Vic (Beasley), Brooks, (Adrian) Clayborn and (Courtney) Upshaw,” Quinn said. “(Philip) Wheeler is going to do some of that and Tyler Starr. That group of guys are guys we see playing on the end of the line, playing (defensive) end and in the nickel. We’re pumped about all of them.”

8. Position changes.  The Falcons have moved a few players to new positions.

North Dakota undrafted rookie Will Ratelle was a linebacker, but will get look at fullback for the Falcons.

He played in 40 games with 23 starts and recorded 266 total tackles. He earned first-team All-Big Sky honors after recording 110 total tackles and four sacks last season.

Also, C.J. Goodwin, who was on the practice squad as a wide receiver last season was moved to cornerback. He’s a 6-foot-4, 220-pounder, which is the same size of huge Seattle cornerback Brandon Browner. (I see DOLt is still misquoting Goodwin's size even though it's been confirmed he measured in at 6' 3/4" and 178 lbs at the Detroit regional combine he was invited too pred-draft.)

Goodwin was used in practice at cornerback last season and went against star wide receiver Julio Jones.

“Guarding Julio Jones is not the easiest job on the planet,” Quinn said. “We said, ‘we might have something here.’ ”

Goodwin, who has ties to former Steeler great Mel Blount, was fine with the move.

“We talked to him after the season and said we wanted to go down this road,” Quinn said. “He wanted to do it. He’s going full-time at corner now. We’ll leave him there and see what it looks like. He’s got great ball skills. Can he play full speed and tackle? Those are things we’ll find out over the next few weeks.”

Goodwin, 26, played at California (Pa.) and was in camp with the Steelers. He also played two college seasons of basketball.

“He’s got ball skills, but now he’s got to back pedal,” Quinn said. “There are times when he looks great. Other times, we’re like, he’s still learning. We are trying to develop him. He’s totally worth looking at and looking into.”

Also, Josh Dawson, who played defensive end at Georgia, is listed as a linebacker by the Falcons.

9. Updated depth chart. Here’s  an updated — post- rookie minicamp — look at the projected Atlanta Falcons depth chart. (Yeah...no. His depth chart is atrocious and incorrect based soley on what he's saying in this article. Click the link if you want to see how bad it is.)

 

Edited by RandomFan
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so quinn finds my lack of faith 'disturbing' does he? 

 

I find his lack of ability to put an actual center on the field who can get the ball to the QB in shotgun formation without rolling it to him regularly, disturbing. Guess that makes us even. yeah yeah, they brought in one this year, so what. He made enough bone headed decisions that my lack of faith is justified until we actually see a winning team put on the field again.

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10 hours ago, atlbaby said:

Why is DOL acting surprise that Dawson is listed at OLB? he played LB his first two seasons at UGA.

 

The UDFA that is most likely to make it is Ivan McLennan

You're absolutely right about JD and I think he prefers that. McLennan is the player I think has a good chance at making the 53.

Quote

Josh Dawson Interview

Josh Dawson – Defensive End – Senior – Georgia

 

Alex Khvatov:  What are your measurements (height, weight and forty time)?

Josh Dawson:  Height was 6’3, weight was 263 and the lowest forty was a 4.68 at the pro day.

 

Alex Khvatov:  Where are you currently training for the 2016 NFL Draft?

Josh Dawson:  Training in Atlanta, Georgia at Chip Smith Performance

 

Alex Khvatov:  Were you satisfied with your overall results from the Pro Day?

Josh Dawson:  I was satisfied with the pro day.  It went very well especially the positional drills.  We went through numerous position drills.  I was prepared for them.  It was a great experience.  I had great feedback.  I met with the Patriots for two hours after the pro day.

 

Alex Khvatov:  What were some of your results from that day?

Josh Dawson:  I had 21 reps on the bench press, 33-inch vert and a 9’4 broad.

 

Alex Khvatov:  Coming out of high school, what schools showed interest in you?

Josh Dawson:  I wanted to stay close to my home.  I was looking at Clemson, Auburn, South Carolina and Georgia.  I actually committed to Vanderbilt for a minute.

 

Alex Khvatov:  Why did you choose Georgia?

Josh Dawson:  It felt more like home.  It fit me more.  Coach Grantham was running the defense, and I felt like I was a good fit in his defense.  I liked the way they used OLB’s.  It was the best fit.

 

Alex Khvatov:  Describe your overall career with the Bulldogs.

Josh Dawson:  I felt like I had a pretty good career.  I wanted to start more games, but I was satisfied.  It was a good time.  I had very productive four years.  I came in as a freshman.  I helped on defense and special teams.  My role got larger.  The best year was my junior season.  I really fit the defense.

 

Alex Khvatov:  What are your strengths?

Josh Dawson:  My leadership ability and work ethic.  I have been a leader since I stepped on campus at Georgia.  Guys look up to me.  My work ethic was the top one on the team.  On the field, I bring toughness and good football IQ.

 

Alex Khvatov:  What areas of your game are you trying to improve upon?

Josh Dawson:  My lateral quickness was my weakest areas.  I was working on it the past three months.  I showed at the pro day that I have that quickness and athleticism.  I can play standup LB or play with the hand in the dirt.

 

Alex Khvatov:  What is the highlight of your career up to this point?

Josh Dawson:  My ultimate highlight was the Tennessee game my junior year.  I picked up a fumble in the end zone.  It was the last score of the game.  The whole junior year was a highlight for me.

 

Alex Khvatov:  What was the biggest thing you learned from your former head coach Mark Richt?

Josh Dawson:  Work hard.  If you want something, put in the effort day in and day out.  If you work hard, things always work out.

 

Alex Khvatov:  Who is your favorite NFL player?

Josh Dawson:  Either Von Miller or Terrell Suggs.

 

Alex Khvatov:  Do you think you can play a hybrid LB role in a 3-4 defense at the next level?

Josh Dawson:  I did my first two years in college.  I played OLB.  I can do it at the next level.  I have the size and the speed.

 

Alex Khvatov:  What separates you from the other players at your position?

Josh Dawson:  My knowledge of the game.  I am a student of the game.  I bring toughness and work ethic.  It separates me from any other player.

 

Alex Khvatov:  What is the most important trait for a defensive lineman?

Josh Dawson:  Be the ultimate competitor.  It is an ongoing battle in the trenches.  It is the biggest trait.

 

Alex Khvatov:  We will see a lot of Georgia prospects in this year’s 2016 NFL Draft.   Who is the best player out of that bunch?

Josh Dawson:  Malcolm Mitchell.  He can play DB and receiver.  He is versatile.  He just has that talent.  He is on top of everybody else.

 

Alex Khvatov:  What players on your team should we keep an eye on next season?

Josh Dawson:  S Dominick Sanders, LB Lorenzo Carter, LB Davin Bellamy and DL John Atkins.

 

Alex Khvatov:  What do you enjoy most about football?

Josh Dawson:  Being able to compete.  It is the ultimate competitive game.  I also love the camaraderie.  Football has done so much for my life.  I have the passion for it.

 

Alex Khvatov:  What are your hobbies?

Josh Dawson:  I listen to music.  I am big into fashion.  I like to watch documentaries and reading.

 

Alex Khvatov:  Finish the sentence, Josh Dawson is….

Josh Dawson:  The ultimate competitor.

 

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CJ is bigger than his pre-draft size a couple of years ago. Although he is not 6-4 (Falcons have him listed as 6-3). My guess is that he is just under 6-3 but it doesn't really matter with his "length" and 40 inch vertical.

I hope he's a quick study because the dude is an athlete.

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On May 11, 2016 at 6:05 PM, RandomFan said:

“The guys kind of playing those spots are Vic (Beasley), Brooks, (Adrian) Clayborn and (Courtney) Upshaw,” Quinn said. “(Philip) Wheeler is going to do some of that and Tyler Starr. That group of guys are guys we see playing on the end of the line, playing (defensive) end and in the nickel. We’re pumped about all of them.”

 

I like how they're sort of interchanging the SAM and LEO spots.  It shows me Quinn 1) isn't beholden to Seattle's dogma on how to play these spots (of course, Seattle isn't either -- look how they moved Red Bryant and Mebane and Irvin around to get them where they wanted them, and how they went and got Bennett and used him at end and tackle); and 2) they are likely going to mix up the rush by using more 3-4 principles, meaning we will disguise the rush better since nobody will know whether the OLB spots are rushing or dropping.

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On 5/11/2016 at 6:54 PM, The O.D.B said:

McKISSIC isn't a bad pick or player but, the obvious front runner to make it IMO is Sharrod.

 

 

For Sure! This is the guy Im thinking will make the team and take someone's  spot or at very least be a great rotational player.

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7 hours ago, JDaveG said:

I like how they're sort of interchanging the SAM and LEO spots.  It shows me Quinn 1) isn't beholden to Seattle's dogma on how to play these spots (of course, Seattle isn't either -- look how they moved Red Bryant and Mebane and Irvin around to get them where they wanted them, and how they went and got Bennett and used him at end and tackle); and 2) they are likely going to mix up the rush by using more 3-4 principles, meaning we will disguise the rush better since nobody will know whether the OLB spots are rushing or dropping.

I'm not sure if I'm misunderstanding something, but if I'm not then I...well, frankly I don't know. To your first point, Seattle has never been beholden to any kind of dogma with their DE or OLB spots either. In fact we are playing them very similarly. As I've had to say often, the LEO and the SLB are very similar positions. The 3 interior DLS already behave a lot like a 34 defense. So I guess I'm confused how you think we are slated to do something differently I guess?

Edited by RandomFan
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On 5/11/2016 at 6:05 PM, RandomFan said:

8. Position changes.  The Falcons have moved a few players to new positions.

 

Also, C.J. Goodwin, who was on the practice squad as a wide receiver last season was moved to cornerback. He’s a 6-foot-4, 220-pounder, which is the same size of huge Seattle cornerback Brandon Browner. (I see DOLt is still misquoting Goodwin's size even though it's been confirmed he measured in at 6' 3/4" and 178 lbs at the Detroit regional combine he was invited too pred-draft.)

 

I see where the confusion comes from. DOL probably read the CBS article below and mixed up the names.

Quote

http://atlanta.cbslocal.com/2015/11/03/falcons-sign-wr-c-j-goodwin-release-wr-laron-byrd/

Flowery Branch, GA – The Atlanta Falcons today announced that they have signed wide receiver C.J. Goodwin to the practice squad and have released wide receiver LaRon Byrd from the practice squad.

Goodwin, 6-3, 190 pounds, was originally signed by the Pittsburgh Steelers as a college free agent following the 2014 NFL Draft out of California University of Pennsylvania. He spent the 2014 season as a member of the Steelers practice squad.

Byrd, 6-4, 220 pounds, was originally signed by the Arizona Cardinals as a college free agent following the 2012 NFL Draft out of Miami. He played in four games for the Cardinals in 2012.

 

Edited by atlbaby
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On May 13, 2016 at 0:30 PM, RandomFan said:

I'm not sure if I'm misunderstanding something, but if I'm not then I...well, frankly I don't know. To your first point, Seattle has never been beholden to any kind of dogma with their DE or OLB spots either. In fact we are playing them very similarly. As I've had to say often, the LEO and the SLB are very similar positions. The 3 interior DLS already behave a lot like a 34 defense. So I guess I'm confused how you think we are slated to do something differently I guess?

Sorry RF -- I missed this yesterday as I was out most of the day.

I was referring to this quote:

"Quinn noted that Reed is a SAM (strongside) or LEO (hybrid defensive end/weakside) player for the Falcons.

“The guys kind of playing those spots are Vic (Beasley), Brooks, (Adrian) Clayborn and (Courtney) Upshaw,” Quinn said. “(Philip) Wheeler is going to do some of that and Tyler Starr. That group of guys are guys we see playing on the end of the line, playing (defensive) end and in the nickel. We’re pumped about all of them.”"

Seattle plays (and we played last season) guys usually more at 1 position or the other.  I don't disagree that they are very similar, but usually the LEO rushes and the SAM either drops or sets the edge.  The SAM isn't a primary pass rusher and the LEO isn't a primary cover guy.  That's not set in stone -- Beasley had an INT last year from the LEO spot.  But it is generically done that way, whereas in a more traditional 3-4, the OLBs tend to play more interchangeably, where one will rush and the other will drop, and they disguise the looks to try to confuse the o-line and QB as to where the pressure will come from.  And we tended to play Beasley at LEO primarily last year and Reed primarily at SAM.  Again, not set in stone, but primarily.

The thing that struck me about this quote is they talk about Reed playing SAM or LEO, as if the two positions were just flipsides of the same role.  And the talk of Wheeler playing both of those positions.  And especially Clayborn, who I guess I assumed would be more at strongside DE than either LEO or SAM.  My point was simply that we apparently are not going to stick with any set idea about who plays where, but will be changing up the players and positions, and also regarding whether the SAM rushes or not.  I know Seattle does some of that, because Irvin played both LEO and SAM and rushed from the SAM position quite a bit, but for the most part, Irvin was the Sam and Avril was the LEO.  Maybe I'm reading too much into the quote, but it looks to me like they will be moving those pieces a bit more, and maybe rushing the SAM more.

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5 hours ago, JDaveG said:

I was referring to this quote:

"Quinn noted that Reed is a SAM (strongside) or LEO (hybrid defensive end/weakside) player for the Falcons.

“The guys kind of playing those spots are Vic (Beasley), Brooks, (Adrian) Clayborn and (Courtney) Upshaw,” Quinn said. “(Philip) Wheeler is going to do some of that and Tyler Starr. That group of guys are guys we see playing on the end of the line, playing (defensive) end and in the nickel. We’re pumped about all of them.”"

Seattle plays (and we played last season) guys usually more at 1 position or the other.  I don't disagree that they are very similar, but usually the LEO rushes and the SAM either drops or sets the edge.  The SAM isn't a primary pass rusher and the LEO isn't a primary cover guy.  That's not set in stone -- Beasley had an INT last year from the LEO spot.  But it is generically done that way, whereas in a more traditional 3-4, the OLBs tend to play more interchangeably, where one will rush and the other will drop, and they disguise the looks to try to confuse the o-line and QB as to where the pressure will come from.  And we tended to play Beasley at LEO primarily last year and Reed primarily at SAM.  Again, not set in stone, but primarily.

The thing that struck me about this quote is they talk about Reed playing SAM or LEO, as if the two positions were just flipsides of the same role.  And the talk of Wheeler playing both of those positions.  And especially Clayborn, who I guess I assumed would be more at strongside DE than either LEO or SAM.  My point was simply that we apparently are not going to stick with any set idea about who plays where, but will be changing up the players and positions, and also regarding whether the SAM rushes or not.  I know Seattle does some of that, because Irvin played both LEO and SAM and rushed from the SAM position quite a bit, but for the most part, Irvin was the Sam and Avril was the LEO.  Maybe I'm reading too much into the quote, but it looks to me like they will be moving those pieces a bit more, and maybe rushing the SAM more.

I had started typing out a long screed, but it was getting too cumbersome and convoluted. So let me try to make it more concise.

I don't forsee them rushing the SAM more than last year, or any of the years they have played this scheme in Seattle. And yeah, I think you're just reading too much into the quote. ;)  I don't see anything in that paragraph that leads me to believe we'll handle any of the roles differently than we did last year, or how Seattle has done it over the years.

First let me just throw this remider out there: we must always keep in mind the differences between our base defense package, and our nickel defense package. That's why I bolded and underlined the sentence in blue, above in your quoted text. The SAM plays on the end of the line too - we can't forget that. The players that man the SAM/LEO positions are very similarly built athletes, and are typically the kind of players that make good wide-9 pass rushing DE's in nickel defense - which both of our DE spots turn into in nickel when we change over from our base defense package.

The talk about the SAM and LEO positions only applied to about 40% of our snaps last year, since as most all of us probably know by now, we were in nickel around 60% of the time. The rest of the time Quinn is talking about filling the two pass rushing DE spots that both look very similar to how the LEO is aligned in the base defense. So when I see those comments from Quinn, I'm thinking he's just talking about the players that they envision playing SAM or LEO in the base defense, AND also the two outside pass rushing DE spots in the nickel defense.

As a clue, he included Clayborn in that discussion. We all know he wasn't a typical SAM/LEO body type last year; but what we do know is that he's been slated to be a fulltime DE this year, and more specifically one of the two primary nickel DE pass rushers. I highly doubt we're going to see Clayborn at 5T at all this year, because I fully expect him to lose weight this offseason after the move back to DE. At 6'2.5" Clayborn supposedly played at 280-285 lbs last season. I wouldn't be at all surprised to see him drop down to the 265-270 lbs range this year in order to be a more effective outside pass rusher - and play more snaps at LEO in base D. Ironically, that's a very similar size to Seattle's LEO, Cliff Avril who plays around 260-265. 

Everyone seems to want to write him off, but I still expect TJax to be the 5T DE in the base defense this year. Think about it, who else is going to do it? Clayborn? Not if he ends up losing weight like I think he will. And even if he doesn't lose weight, Clayborn is already in line for around 60% of the snaps by being one of the two DEs in nickel, along with Beasley. Quinn likes to rotate his DL's and keep them fresh. Even if he didn't, you couldn't give Clayborn many more snaps anyway - certainly not enough to handle much of the frequent double teams the 5T draws his way in the base defense.

It's the same thing with Shelby. He's going to be getting a lot of snaps by being a DT in the nickel package. If we want to cut TJax in training camp, there is really only one realistic option I see at this point. Depending on how many snaps Jarrett and Hageman end up getting in nickel in addition to thier base D duties, that might actually free up Shelby to get a lot of snaps at the 5T DE.

For an example of how that could work out in snap counts: based on last years splits Jarrett and Hageman at NT and 3T should both get around 40% of the defensive snaps in the base defense alone. If both of them get to play an additional 20% in nickel defense, that would increase their total snap percentage to 60%. Between the two DT positions in nickel D, that would leave 80% of the snaps to be accounted for. Assume that Babs takes around 60% of those as a fulltime DT in the nickel D. That would leave 20% of the nickel D snaps for Shelby to fill at DT - which would leave him available to effectively play the 40% of snaps at 5T DE in base D for a total of only 60% snaps. That is just an example of how it could work without TJax. But that assumes a healthy DLine all year long, which we know isn't likely to happen. So I still think Jackson is on the roster this year - unless someone unexpected in camp just blows up and improves our depth at that spot. 

Regarding Reed, he does have the body type and skillset to play both the SAM and LEO in base, and be a pass rushing LEO type wide-9 DE in nickel. As does Beasley, Upshaw, and Starr. I'll be honest, I was a bit surprised to see Wheeler included in that group. But I'll trust that Quinn knows what he's doing. I'm guessing it's got a lot to do with just having some backups crosstrained in case of a rash of injuries. And Wheeler has been a good all around player his whole career, with enough size to pull if off at 6'2" and at least 245.

So much for more concise. But it's less convoluted than my first attempt, at least I think.

Edited by RandomFan
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