Jump to content

Prince dead at 57.....wow!


g-dawg
 Share

Recommended Posts

4 minutes ago, Gritzblitz 2.0 said:

Just because he overdosed doesn't mean that he was an addict or had a problem. I can't tell you how many times I have seen a person take too many prescribed opiate painkillers on top of a severe respiratory infection and end up in respiratory failure. It doesn't necessarily mean that they are a junkie or routinely abused drugs.

Get outta here with that reasonableness.  I'm going to need a link to a british tabloid or stormfront to verify those findings. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 116
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

5 hours ago, Gritzblitz 2.0 said:

Just because he overdosed doesn't mean that he was an addict or had a problem. I can't tell you how many times I have seen a person take too many prescribed opiate painkillers on top of a severe respiratory infection and end up in respiratory failure. It doesn't necessarily mean that they are a junkie or routinely abused drugs.

That is similar to what I have been trying to say. There are those who use drugs just to feel good enough to function, whether that is mentally or physically. I use Adderall just to function, am I an addict. If something goes wrong and I die from its use, am I just another drug abuser who died.

Yes, there are many who have gone to far, and their functionality has been destroyed by drug use. Those are the ones that do not get much of my sympathy, because once one has crossed over from any drug, legal or illegal, to the point that it is not helping functionality, but hindering it, they need help. I also mentioned those like Belshi and Farley who just took drugs without seemingly any goal but to see how far they could go. They to do not get my sympathy.

As I have wrote though, for many others, some drugs, legal or illegal, seemingly correct a chemical imbalance that makes them feel almost normal, functional. There are those in constant pain just trying to alleviate it. In desperation, many go outside legal means, though I do not condone that, I understand why. There are millions of people suffering mentally and physically with a medical industry woefully unable to help, because the medical industry nor the anti- drug crowd look for the reasons and the answer to why the person needs the drugs.

I am hardly known as a bleeding heart, but I understand addiction, and I know about needing medication. I am on Adderall, but with my doctors I am still looking for the reason why I need it. I just a had a whole blood histamine test, and I am also being tested for autoimmune disorders. I need the drug because my body is malfunctioning somewhere. I hope to find that malfunction, and correct it thus ending my need for drugs. That, to me, is how it should work. Addictions, in many cases, is just a persons coping mechanism to get around a malfunction.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

25 minutes ago, AREA 51 said:

That is similar to what I have been trying to say. There are those who use drugs just to feel good enough to function, whether that is mentally or physically. I use Adderall just to function, am I an addict. If something goes wrong and I die from its use, am I just another drug abuser who died.

Yes, there are many who have gone to far, and their functionality has been destroyed by drug use. Those are the ones that do not get much of my sympathy, because once one has crossed over from any drug, legal or illegal, to the point that it is not helping functionality, but hindering it, they need help. I also mentioned those like Belshi and Farley who just took drugs without seemingly any goal but to see how far they could go. They to do not get my sympathy.

As I have wrote though, for many others, some drugs, legal or illegal, seemingly correct a chemical imbalance that makes them feel almost normal, functional. There are those in constant pain just trying to alleviate it. In desperation, many go outside legal means, though I do not condone that, I understand why. There are millions of people suffering mentally and physically with a medical industry woefully unable to help, because the medical industry nor the anti- drug crowd look for the reasons and the answer to why the person needs the drugs.

I am hardly known as a bleeding heart, but I understand addiction, and I know about needing medication. I am on Adderall, but with my doctors I am still looking for the reason why I need it. I just a had a whole blood histamine test, and I am also being tested for autoimmune disorders. I need the drug because my body is malfunctioning somewhere. I hope to find that malfunction, and correct it thus ending my need for drugs. That, to me, is how it should work. Addictions, in many cases, is just a persons coping mechanism to get around a malfunction.

And sometimes it's just a horrible accident. I have seen plenty of grandmothers with no history of substance abuse take one too many percocets or dalaudids because they had the flu and felt like crap and the next thing they know they are on a ventilator or worse. 

Prince could have been a drug abuser. I have no insight into his personal life. But it's not right to infer that based in this information.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 minutes ago, Gritzblitz 2.0 said:

And sometimes it's just a horrible accident. I have seen plenty of grandmothers with no history of substance abuse take one too many percocets or dalaudids because they had the flu and felt like crap and the next thing they know they are on a ventilator or worse. 

Prince could have been a drug abuser. I have no insight into his personal life. But it's not right to infer that based in this information.

Exactly.  Over a year ago I had all four wisdom teeth removed at the same time.  They gave me some opoid based pain killers to use.  I was careful and only used them a few times when it was necessary.  But I did have an incident where my breathing got really slow and I was seriously considering calling 9/11.  I literally used less than 1/4th of the pills they prescribed, but I can fully understand how someone could accidentally take a pill or two extra in a day to deal with serious pain (mine wasn't that bad) and just stop breathing.  Those things are scary as ****.

Also, after taking a few of them, I can fully understand how people get addicted to them.  I never understood that before - "how do you get addicted to aspirin?" - but I get it now.  That's why, after I was sure that I was in the clear regarding pain, I flushed the rest of them down the toilet.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 minutes ago, Leon Troutsky said:

Exactly.  Over a year ago I had all four wisdom teeth removed at the same time.  They gave me some opoid based pain killers to use.  I was careful and only used them a few times when it was necessary.  But I did have an incident where my breathing got really slow and I was seriously considering calling 9/11.  I literally used less than 1/4th of the pills they prescribed, but I can fully understand how someone could accidentally take a pill or two extra in a day to deal with serious pain (mine wasn't that bad) and just stop breathing.  Those things are scary as ****.

Also, after taking a few of them, I can fully understand how people get addicted to them.  I never understood that before - "how do you get addicted to aspirin?" - but I get it now.  That's why, after I was sure that I was in the clear regarding pain, I flushed the rest of them down the toilet.  

They are highly addictive and very dangerous and there seem to be no shortage of physicians willing to prescribe them for any little thing. 90 percent of the drug dependency I see is prescription opiates. The same people who would look down on street junkies have no problem getting strung out on pills because that think it's OK as long as their doctor prescribes them. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Back on topic, before deputy dingdong/barrister butthole/angel of death mcshittybritches got us off track, one of my favorite Prince covers (sorry, it's purple rain again) is from Adam Levine, before Prince passed away.  I knew he "played" guitar with Maroon 5 before this, but he can actually play.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Mdrake, grow up. I disagreed with Moses's assertion that Princes death, from an OD, was not tragic in the sense of a real tragedy.  You now come along and stick your nose right up my ... and get all faux outraged, as a few others have. The facts will come out on Prince, but to me, it looks like a wasted death from a man who certainly knew better. If you guys want to try to make the point that addiction to pain meds is the issue, so be it. We've all had injuries, some worse then others, but to ignore common sense and stay clean rather then become addicted, ruins lives. 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

21 minutes ago, dirtyhairy said:

Mdrake, grow up. I disagreed with Moses's assertion that Princes death, from an OD, was not tragic in the sense of a real tragedy.  You now come along and stick your nose right up my ... and get all faux outraged, as a few others have. The facts will come out on Prince, but to me, it looks like a wasted death from a man who certainly knew better. If you guys want to try to make the point that addiction to pain meds is the issue, so be it. We've all had injuries, some worse then others, but to ignore common sense and stay clean rather then become addicted, ruins lives. 

 

Having been very close to a few addicts and at one time, on the verge of being one myself, it's very easy to not realize you are overdosing.  Sometimes common sense doesn't win the day.  At one time, I was using an old football injury as a way to get oxycontin, crushing up a couple, chasing with a beer and "going for a ride".  I was lucky to be able to move away from it but sometimes, people have issues that they simply can't overcome.  Anytime someone is struggling like that and can never beat it, that's a tragedy, whether it's a famous person or not IMO...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 4/23/2016 at 4:28 PM, AREA 51 said:

I am not one to defend cases of drug overdoses especially those of the recreational kind. I have no sympathy or respect for the likes of Jimi Hendrix or John Belushi or Chris Farley or any other who has overdosed on recreational drugs. They chose to do lethal levels of drugs they had to know were dangerous. However there is a new danger emerging that does get more of my sympathy. We should wait to judge until final results are in, but the addiction to prescription drugs and their overdoses is something quite different than the old school drug overdoses.

Addiction of any sort are hard to beat weather it is alcohol, tobacco, or drugs. I have seen those addictions in my family. Alcohol and smoking killed my mother. Smoking killed my father and three of his brothers. Alcohol killed my grandfather, and none of them were bad people, just people that got hooked on something they thought was almost harmless at the time. 

Once hooked, there are chemical pathways that are affected. Will power is not always enough. In the case of prescription drugs, I have personally seen medications prescribed for a medical reason, and quickly grow into an addiction. My brother's father in- law has hip pain, and got hooked on oxytocin, and his need for more oxytocin got messy. 

I myself had to battle alcohol, and still battle trying to quit dipping snuff. I have an inherited a genetic predisposition to easily become addicted to nearly anything. One night of drinking when I was a teen, and I was a heavy weekend drinker for nearly thirty years. A friend offers me a dip of Copenhagen when I am sixteen, and I am still hooked trying to quit three decades later.

Such quick addiction happens to some people. Some can have a drink or a bout with drugs and never do it again, others can never stop again. It is why I worry for my daughters ever trying alcohol, especially my oldest, who has my personality. She has not gone down my path of partying. She has it together. She is going to Montana State next year for a civil engineering degree. She is so much more together than I was, but I fear one night of partying could derail everything, so I warn her over and over.

Even when one is not prone to addiction, it can come quickly with drugs, legal and illegal. That is where the problem is. Once an addiction of any kind has set in, couseling is not what is needed. In my opinion, correcting the chemical imbalances that were there and the new ones created, have to be addressed. Though this may sound a bit contradictory, it was only after my doctor prescribed me Adderall that my cravings for alcohol ceased. I mean, my desire for alcohol immediately ceased, and five years later, I have never missed it or even wanted a sip. To appreciate that statement one would have to know how much alcohol I consumed, like my wife. I obviously had an imbalance that was corrected by the medication. I take it only as prescribed, and have never had to increase it, and my doctor constantly monitors me.

Though I despise a medical industry I believe wants us sick so they can treat symptoms with drugs, the fact is, with a good doctor, medications can work, but the goal should always be to find the ultimate cause for the need for the drugs, and correct the problem. This needs to be of more emphasis in the medical community. I always ask this question. Name one disease or disorder that has been cured by the medical industry. The answer is none. We have drugs to treat symptoms of diabetes, depression, epilepsy, and so many more, the effectiveness of which is debatable, especially with anti- depressants, but no cures.  

Prince's doctors, if overdose is the case, failed him. If they were responsible and monitored him properly they should have seen a growing dependency that needed medical attention, not more prescriptions. Chemicals were getting out of balance and needed correcting. Prince, himself, might have been in pain that was not addressed and then that becomes his choice, risk death or stay in pain. Neither is a good option, but the pain, not physical addiction, might have pushed his drug use. It was the choice my brother's father in-law was making.

The point of all this, addiction comes in many forms. Unfortunately, the attitude that the addicted choose to be addicted prevails, so counseling and will power is the prevailing treatment, while in my life I have seen that correcting the chemical imbalances that promoted the addiction is much more affective. If pain is the cause of ones escalating drug use, I do not have much knowledge there, so I just do not know what could be done. Correcting what is causing the pain seems to be the answer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Im 20... I applaud you for this write up. My Dad introduced me to Prince, top 3 most influential artists of my childhood. It seems you and him have had many of the same struggles. Good things to learn from..

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 4/23/2016 at 4:28 PM, AREA 51 said:

I am not one to defend cases of drug overdoses especially those of the recreational kind. I have no sympathy or respect for the likes of Jimi Hendrix or John Belushi or Chris Farley or any other who has overdosed on recreational drugs. They chose to do lethal levels of drugs they had to know were dangerous. However there is a new danger emerging that does get more of my sympathy. We should wait to judge until final results are in, but the addiction to prescription drugs and their overdoses is something quite different than the old school drug overdoses.

Addiction of any sort are hard to beat weather it is alcohol, tobacco, or drugs. I have seen those addictions in my family. Alcohol and smoking killed my mother. Smoking killed my father and three of his brothers. Alcohol killed my grandfather, and none of them were bad people, just people that got hooked on something they thought was almost harmless at the time. 

Once hooked, there are chemical pathways that are affected. Will power is not always enough. In the case of prescription drugs, I have personally seen medications prescribed for a medical reason, and quickly grow into an addiction. My brother's father in- law has hip pain, and got hooked on oxytocin, and his need for more oxytocin got messy. 

I myself had to battle alcohol, and still battle trying to quit dipping snuff. I have an inherited a genetic predisposition to easily become addicted to nearly anything. One night of drinking when I was a teen, and I was a heavy weekend drinker for nearly thirty years. A friend offers me a dip of Copenhagen when I am sixteen, and I am still hooked trying to quit three decades later.

Such quick addiction happens to some people. Some can have a drink or a bout with drugs and never do it again, others can never stop again. It is why I worry for my daughters ever trying alcohol, especially my oldest, who has my personality. She has not gone down my path of partying. She has it together. She is going to Montana State next year for a civil engineering degree. She is so much more together than I was, but I fear one night of partying could derail everything, so I warn her over and over.

Even when one is not prone to addiction, it can come quickly with drugs, legal and illegal. That is where the problem is. Once an addiction of any kind has set in, couseling is not what is needed. In my opinion, correcting the chemical imbalances that were there and the new ones created, have to be addressed. Though this may sound a bit contradictory, it was only after my doctor prescribed me Adderall that my cravings for alcohol ceased. I mean, my desire for alcohol immediately ceased, and five years later, I have never missed it or even wanted a sip. To appreciate that statement one would have to know how much alcohol I consumed, like my wife. I obviously had an imbalance that was corrected by the medication. I take it only as prescribed, and have never had to increase it, and my doctor constantly monitors me.

Though I despise a medical industry I believe wants us sick so they can treat symptoms with drugs, the fact is, with a good doctor, medications can work, but the goal should always be to find the ultimate cause for the need for the drugs, and correct the problem. This needs to be of more emphasis in the medical community. I always ask this question. Name one disease or disorder that has been cured by the medical industry. The answer is none. We have drugs to treat symptoms of diabetes, depression, epilepsy, and so many more, the effectiveness of which is debatable, especially with anti- depressants, but no cures.  

Prince's doctors, if overdose is the case, failed him. If they were responsible and monitored him properly they should have seen a growing dependency that needed medical attention, not more prescriptions. Chemicals were getting out of balance and needed correcting. Prince, himself, might have been in pain that was not addressed and then that becomes his choice, risk death or stay in pain. Neither is a good option, but the pain, not physical addiction, might have pushed his drug use. It was the choice my brother's father in-law was making.

The point of all this, addiction comes in many forms. Unfortunately, the attitude that the addicted choose to be addicted prevails, so counseling and will power is the prevailing treatment, while in my life I have seen that correcting the chemical imbalances that promoted the addiction is much more affective. If pain is the cause of ones escalating drug use, I do not have much knowledge there, so I just do not know what could be done. Correcting what is causing the pain seems to be the answer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Listen man I know a lot of you here know me and you will know how I am which is a very rarely serious but I'm going to say this having witnessed it first-hand my wife who is 100% against any and all drugs and maybe 4 times a year has a margarita by the pool she just does not like the feeling of not being in control wound  Up blowing out her knee and of course the doctors prescribe Percocet 5 weeks into being on those pills she developed a need thankfully she was smart enough to realize her body was becoming dependent on them and I watched her go through excruciating pain because the need was not healed not even close but she was smart enough to know she had to stop the prescriptions and learn to live with the pain

 

 

An entire year later her knee is still bothersome and no doctor yet has been able to figure out why after about 10 minutes of walking she is about to collapse

 

 

But after the painkiller ordeal to this day she still chooses to suffer until somebody can figure out the root cause rather and then take any opioid on the market.

 

So I can tell anybody here with first-hand knowledge of somebody who is not an addict what goes through a trauma can easily wind up with a severe problem just trying to fix one

 

 

 

 

Attention Grammar Nazis this is from talk to text so if anything is wrong blame Google

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I tweaked my back last year and was given prescription strength Aleve and Hydrocodone. I took the Aleve, never took a single Hydrocodone out of fear.

I spend what seems like half of my job looking at medical records of injured plaintiffs. It's scary how many narcotic pain medications doctors prescribe these people, and you can tell just from records which ones get hooked and become pill seekers. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 4/30/2016 at 1:36 AM, clownorg said:

Listen man I know a lot of you here know me and you will know how I am which is a very rarely serious but I'm going to say this having witnessed it first-hand my wife who is 100% against any and all drugs and maybe 4 times a year has a margarita by the pool she just does not like the feeling of not being in control wound  Up blowing out her knee and of course the doctors prescribe Percocet 5 weeks into being on those pills she developed a need thankfully she was smart enough to realize her body was becoming dependent on them and I watched her go through excruciating pain because the need was not healed not even close but she was smart enough to know she had to stop the prescriptions and learn to live with the pain

 

 

An entire year later her knee is still bothersome and no doctor yet has been able to figure out why after about 10 minutes of walking she is about to collapse

 

 

But after the painkiller ordeal to this day she still chooses to suffer until somebody can figure out the root cause rather and then take any opioid on the market.

 

So I can tell anybody here with first-hand knowledge of somebody who is not an addict what goes through a trauma can easily wind up with a severe problem just trying to fix one

 

 

 

 

Attention Grammar Nazis this is from talk to text so if anything is wrong blame Google

Sorry to hear that man.  Hope they figure it out sooner rather than later.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If one thinks the details of Prince's death could be ugly, it is going to be nothing compared to the ugliness that is the battle over his money. He has been dead barely ten days, and the family is already in court. There are family members coming out everywhere. Now, there is another claiming to be a half- sister. I am thinking about going up there and claiming half- brother status.

A lot of money, no will, and more than a few family members (real or otherwise), does not a happy family reunion make. Even when there is a will its ugly, this will be even worse.

Now, why a man with so much worth would not have a will is bewildering.

 

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share


×
×
  • Create New...