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Fire The Qb Killer


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By no means I think AB is a dumbazz... he made his riches by doing something right. I just think Blank is a man of continuity and accountability. I think AB will give his staff another shot to redeem themselves from the learning curve of a 1st season together with a patchwork of players. But... at the same time, I was not a fan of whatever KS was trying to incorporate into the offense.

I will definitely keep a watchful eye on Black Monday though.... What are you wishing for dawg?

I am wishing for Dimitroff to be fired and for Quinn to work closely w/ Blank on getting a brand new GM and scouting staff in the building at Flowery Branch. Just because Quinn knows "the type" of player he wants, does not mean just any GM can deliver those players through the draft - the GM is much, much more than an order taker and good coaches don't automatically know which college players will fit hand-n-glove in their schemes - although they should be heavily consulted.

GM Candidates:

  • Trent Kirchner, Director of Pro Personnel/Seattle Seahawks:

otential candidate: Trent Kirchner

College: Saint John’s University (Bachelor’s)

Playing history: Two years at quarterback for Saint John’s (Minnesota).

Employment history: Public relations/college scouting intern, Seattle Seahawks (2000-2001); college scouting coordinator, Washington Redskins(2001-2002); pro scout, Carolina Panthers (2002-2010); assistant director, pro personnel, Seattle Seahawks (2010-2012); director of pro personnel, Seattle Seahawks (2013-2014); co-director, player personnel, Seattle Seahawks (2015-present)

Why he’d be a fit: He’s been one of the more popular names in NFL general manager circles the past few years, interviewing with the Jets last offseason for their GM post. He’s been one of the bigger keys to Seattle’s recent NFC success -- for instance, Seattle GM John Schneider credited Kirchner for setting up the team’s free agency board last offseason. While he’s never had control of an entire department, he’s worked his way up and has seen how multiple organizations run their operations. He also has a pedigree of success coming from Seattle, where the franchise has made shrewd draft moves and free-agency signings during his time in the front office. When he worked in the Pro Personnel department, he helped facilitate the trades for Marshawn Lynch andJimmy Graham as well as the free-agent signings of Michael Bennett, Cliff Avril,Tony McDaniel and Sidney Rice. He also was partially responsible for the Percy Harvin and Matt Flynn moves, which didn’t work out so well for the Seahawks.

Are there concerns?: If there are any concerns, it would mostly be that he hasn’t held the position before. But at this point, he has the experience necessary as he moved up the personnel department with Seattle and has been involved in a lot of different areas. How he would handle the draft would be a question mark since he’s come up mostly in the pro personnel side of things, but he has been in a front office that has done well with building through the draft since 2010. He would have to put together a strong college scouting department.

Reality he would be a candidate: In my opinion, he is someone the Lions should heavily consider and almost definitely interview when they are allowed to talk with front office executives from other teams. He’s been in the candidate pool before and has helped build one of the top teams in the NFC. He’s been part of an organization not afraid to make trades to move up or back in the draft and also not afraid to pull off deals for veteran players who can help (see Lynch and Graham). The question Martha Ford may have is about some of the personalities the Seahawks brought in while he has been in Seattle, includingFrank Clark in the draft and Percy Harvin in a trade.

  • George Paton, Assistant GM - Minnesota Vikings: the midst of a fall that has taken them from a 5-0 start to a record of 6-7 and being on the brink of post-season elimination, the Atlanta Falcons are reportedly thinking about making changes to their front office. According to one prominent source, one of the favorites to replace him is currently employed by the Minnesota Vikings.

    George Paton, the Vikings' assistant General Manager (as opposed to the assistant to the General Manager), is one of two people named by Jason LaCanfora of CBS Sports as candidates to replace current Falcons' GM Thomas Dimitroff. Falcons' owner Arthur Blank is reportedly committed to first-year head coach Dan Quinn, and may be looking to shake things up higher in the ranks.

    Paton (pronounced like "Patton") is in his eighth season of working with the Vikings. He has worked with current Vikings' GM Rick Spielman at his stops in both Chicago and Miami. He has declined several interviews over the past couple of years for GM positions, including interviews with the Chicago Bears, the New York Jets, and the St. Louis Rams.

    The other person that LaCanfora lists as a favorite for the job is Thomas Kirchner, who currently serves as the director of pro personnel for the Seattle Seahawks.

    Paton seems to be happy with being Spielman's right-hand man at this point, given the number of opportunities he's turned down. Still, with a Falcons' team that has a first-year head coach and is moving into a new stadium soon, perhaps the Atlanta job would be enticing enough for him to jump ship.

    Of course, the Falcons would have to fire Dimitroff first. There hasn't been any indication at this time that they're going to do that for certain, but with the way the Falcons have collapsed this season, apparently ownership thinks that changes need to be made.

  • Duke Tobin, director of player personnel, Cincinnati Bengals: Like McClay, Tobin has already reached the scouting peak of an owner-driven operation. He's got a quiet way, but the talent in Cincy speaks for itself.

    ON THE WAY UP

    Scott Fitterer, co-director of player personnel, Seattle Seahawks: A great communicator and personality just promoted from college director who has helped John Schneider build an outrageously talented young core.

  • http://www.nfl.com/news/story/0ap3000000442679/article/nfl-general-manager-candidates-new-names-and-familiar-faces

NFL general manager candidates: new names and familiar faces

  • 0ap1000000208593.jpg
  • By Albert Breer
  • NFL Media reporter
  • Published: Dec. 12, 2014 at 01:30 p.m.
  • Updated: Dec. 12, 2014 at 03:17 p.m

NFL Media's Albert Breer touches on multiple topics in his robust Inside the NFL Notebook, including (click on each link to go directly to the topic):

»

And much more, beginning with the top GM candidates in a complex market. ...

Last season's NFL champion was coached by a man who once was fired by the Jets and later was canned by the Patriots. In the Super Bowl, he beat a coach who was fired by the Panthers. And that coach, to get to the big game, beat another coach who long ago was whacked by the Browns.

The point here? Forever, NFL wisdom has held that coaches can benefit long-term from getting the ax.

So why doesn't that go for general managers, as well?

We briefly addressed the question in this notebook a few weeks back. And in the time since, feedback from league folks has rolled in, flowing right into the time of year when my annual "Future General Managers" list runs.

The fact remains, Washington Redskins GM Bruce Allen is the only man in that position that has held the same title somewhere else, which is striking when you count up the nine NFL head coaches who are in second-chance situations, and even more amazing when you look at retread success stories like Ron Wolf, Ernie Accorsi, Bobby Beathard and Bill Polian.

"All these second-chance head coaches, you always hear, 'Well, they learned so much from the experience,' " one current general manager said. "It's like any other job. The second-chance head coaches -- (John) Fox, (Andy) Reid, (Bill) Belichick -- they are better for the experience. It's like Jay Gruden said, he didn't realize the enormity of the job when he took it. For a GM, you have to manage departments, assess value. It's bizarre to me that you wouldn't want someone with experience."

One NFC executive laid out three reasons for this to us:

1) In the past, there has been less turnover in GM jobs than with coaches.

2) There are fewer young GMs than young head coaches, so fewer go back into the cycle.

3) There's less of a natural progression back after being fired, where coaches can immediately rebuild their reputation as coordinators. (Ken Whisenhunt's arc from 2012 to '14 is a good example.)

The executive then speculated that things could change this year, because two of the above conditions have shifted. The cycle has accelerated -- so fewer GMs are getting second shots at hiring coaches or drafting quarterbacks -- and there are more front-office folks in their late 30s and early 40s. That means the market for a new GM -- and there could be a half-dozen or so teams seeking one in a few weeks -- is more complex than it's been.

So with that in mind, we're presenting our candidates for 2015 in two groups: the second-chancers and the first-timers:

SECOND-CHANCERS

Mark Dominik, ESPN analyst: Was a Buccaneers lifer before being shown the door at the end of last season, so Dominik was part of a championship group early on and built a team that still has young talent. His downfall as GM in Tampa Bay was striking out on his first draft pick -- quarterback Josh Freeman -- which seriously set the franchise back.

Tom Heckert, director of pro personnel, Denver Broncos: Something of a victim of circumstance in Cleveland, Heckert built the foundation for a contending Browns team -- and he sparkled as an evaluator prior to that in Philly. In Denver, the team's success in free agency says plenty about Heckert. He didhave a DUI arrest in 2013.

Jeff Ireland, consultant: Last year, CBS Dallas did a study, based on games played and starts, that ranked Miami as the NFL's top drafting team from 2009 to '13. And Ireland drafted Ryan Tannehillbetween Robert Griffin III and Brandon Weeden during that run. He wasn't perfect, but he was better than you think.

Scot McCloughan, consultant: McCloughan left Trent Baalke and, later, Jim Harbaugh with an incredibly talented team that made three straight NFC title games in San Francisco and was the righthand man to Seahawks GM John Schneider as Seattle became a champion. The Raiders could be a fit here.

Scott Pioli, assistant GM, Atlanta Falcons: Pioli's time in Kansas City carried off-field drama, but the on-field cupboard he left Andy Reid was fairly full. He drafted or re-signed nine Pro Bowl players in K.C. and left the new regime with $20 million in cap space. It wouldn't be shocking if the Jets inquired here.

Mike Tannenbaum, coaching agent: A hard run at a title after consecutive AFC title game appearances left the Jets in a tough spot after his ouster, but he got the team there in the first place and fostered an inclusive environment that people in that building have learned to appreciate in the two years since.

Brian Xanders, senior personnel executive, Detroit Lions: As Broncos GM, Xanders built the roster that lured Peyton Manning, with Demaryius Thomas among the franchise-level talents acquired. And in Detroit, he's spearheaded an effort to modernize the scouting operation and was part of a coaching search.

FIRST-TIMERS

Chris Ballard, director of player personnel, Kansas City Chiefs: Pulled his name out of the Tampa search last year, and he will probably be the first guy on a few lists. Has extensive experience in both college and pro scouting.

Nick Caserio, director of player personnel, New England Patriots: Many took his Dolphins interview in January as a signal that he's ready to seriously consider leaving Foxborough. Instrumental in Belichick's recent Patriot makeover.

Harrison: Power Rankings, Week 15
Eric DeCosta, assistant GM, Baltimore Ravens: Not a whole lot needs to be said about DeCosta, who has Ozzie Newsome's job waiting for him. It'd take a gold-standard gig (see: Giants) to pry him from that.

Brian Gaine, director of pro personnel, Houston Texans:Was a candidate for recent openings with the Rams, Jets andDolphins, and is a trusted voice in the building of the new Tom Gamble, vice president of player personnel, Philadelphia Eagles: Carries a big stick as an evaluator for Chip Kelly and played a major role in the Niners' recent revival. The Jets interviewed him in 2013 and could circle back.

Will McClay, assistant director of player personnel, Dallas Cowboys: McClay has ascended to the top of the personnel department in Dallas. And with the Cowboys' resurgence, he should become a hot name.

Terry McDonough, vice president of player personnel, Arizona Cardinals: Worked for Belichick in Cleveland and Newsome in Baltimore, and the Cardinals' success has restored his rep after some tough years in Jacksonville.

Rick Mueller, director of pro personnel, Philadelphia Eagles: Mueller's work has flown under the radar, but he's a valued voice in Philly. And he played a big role in putting Sean Payton's Saints in position to routinely contend.

Ryan Pace, director of player personnel, New Orleans Saints: You never hear much about Pace -- and that's by design. But he leads the personnel side under GM Mickey Loomis, and has drawn interest in the past.

Jon Robinson, director of player personnel, Tampa BayBuccaneers: Robinson spearheaded solid Patriots drafts in 2010, '11 and '12, and joined Tampa in May. Some believe he could eventually land in Houston.

Matt Russell, director of player personnel, Denver Broncos:Widely regarded as one of the NFL's best evaluators of college talent, Russell is a confidant of John Elway on all decisions. Like Heckert, he has a 2013 DUI to explain.

Duke Tobin, director of player personnel, Cincinnati Bengals: Like McClay, Tobin works in an owner-centric model, and has played a substantial role in stocking a very talented roster.

Lionel Vital, director of player personnel, Atlanta Falcons: A Tampa finalist last year, Vital occupies the spot that current GMs Les Snead and David Caldwell once filled. Like McDonough, has a Belichick/Newsome pedigree.

Eliot Wolf, director of pro personnel, Green Bay Packers: Ron Wolf's son would be very young (32) to be a GM, but he is considered a rising star in the business. The success of John Dorsey and Schneider certainly doesn't hurt.

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It was a pretty dismal season. It was too good to be true that we were going to completely overhaul this trainwreck in one season.

If we do not dominate the NFC South we are not going to the Superbowl unless we are a wild card.

The NFC South is not waiting for us to beat them. The rest of our conference is building. We have 3 teams that like to use us as a punching bag.

Who are they going to fire after one season? I would be surprised if that happened.

What I am more concerned about is losing some of the talent we have in players. They are not going to hang out on a perpetually losing team. They want the ring.

hey you all have some Happy Holidays.

GooooooooFalcons.

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I am wishing for Dimitroff to be fired and for Quinn to work closely w/ Blank on getting a brand new GM and scouting staff in the building at Flowery Branch. Just because Quinn knows "the type" of player he wants, does not mean just any GM can deliver those players through the draft - the GM is much, much more than an order taker and good coaches don't automatically know which college players will fit hand-n-glove in their schemes - although they should be heavily consulted.

GM Candidates:

  • Trent Kirchner, Director of Pro Personnel/Seattle Seahawks:

otential candidate: Trent Kirchner

College: Saint John’s University (Bachelor’s)

Playing history: Two years at quarterback for Saint John’s (Minnesota).

Employment history: Public relations/college scouting intern, Seattle Seahawks (2000-2001); college scouting coordinator, Washington Redskins(2001-2002); pro scout, Carolina Panthers (2002-2010); assistant director, pro personnel, Seattle Seahawks (2010-2012); director of pro personnel, Seattle Seahawks (2013-2014); co-director, player personnel, Seattle Seahawks (2015-present)

Why he’d be a fit: He’s been one of the more popular names in NFL general manager circles the past few years, interviewing with the Jets last offseason for their GM post. He’s been one of the bigger keys to Seattle’s recent NFC success -- for instance, Seattle GM John Schneider credited Kirchner for setting up the team’s free agency board last offseason. While he’s never had control of an entire department, he’s worked his way up and has seen how multiple organizations run their operations. He also has a pedigree of success coming from Seattle, where the franchise has made shrewd draft moves and free-agency signings during his time in the front office. When he worked in the Pro Personnel department, he helped facilitate the trades for Marshawn Lynch andJimmy Graham as well as the free-agent signings of Michael Bennett, Cliff Avril,Tony McDaniel and Sidney Rice. He also was partially responsible for the Percy Harvin and Matt Flynn moves, which didn’t work out so well for the Seahawks.

Are there concerns?: If there are any concerns, it would mostly be that he hasn’t held the position before. But at this point, he has the experience necessary as he moved up the personnel department with Seattle and has been involved in a lot of different areas. How he would handle the draft would be a question mark since he’s come up mostly in the pro personnel side of things, but he has been in a front office that has done well with building through the draft since 2010. He would have to put together a strong college scouting department.

Reality he would be a candidate: In my opinion, he is someone the Lions should heavily consider and almost definitely interview when they are allowed to talk with front office executives from other teams. He’s been in the candidate pool before and has helped build one of the top teams in the NFC. He’s been part of an organization not afraid to make trades to move up or back in the draft and also not afraid to pull off deals for veteran players who can help (see Lynch and Graham). The question Martha Ford may have is about some of the personalities the Seahawks brought in while he has been in Seattle, includingFrank Clark in the draft and Percy Harvin in a trade.

  • George Paton, Assistant GM - Minnesota Vikings: the midst of a fall that has taken them from a 5-0 start to a record of 6-7 and being on the brink of post-season elimination, the Atlanta Falcons are reportedly thinking about making changes to their front office. According to one prominent source, one of the favorites to replace him is currently employed by the Minnesota Vikings.

    George Paton, the Vikings' assistant General Manager (as opposed to the assistant to the General Manager), is one of two people named by Jason LaCanfora of CBS Sports as candidates to replace current Falcons' GM Thomas Dimitroff. Falcons' owner Arthur Blank is reportedly committed to first-year head coach Dan Quinn, and may be looking to shake things up higher in the ranks.

    Paton (pronounced like "Patton") is in his eighth season of working with the Vikings. He has worked with current Vikings' GM Rick Spielman at his stops in both Chicago and Miami. He has declined several interviews over the past couple of years for GM positions, including interviews with the Chicago Bears, the New York Jets, and the St. Louis Rams.

    The other person that LaCanfora lists as a favorite for the job is Thomas Kirchner, who currently serves as the director of pro personnel for the Seattle Seahawks.

    Paton seems to be happy with being Spielman's right-hand man at this point, given the number of opportunities he's turned down. Still, with a Falcons' team that has a first-year head coach and is moving into a new stadium soon, perhaps the Atlanta job would be enticing enough for him to jump ship.

    Of course, the Falcons would have to fire Dimitroff first. There hasn't been any indication at this time that they're going to do that for certain, but with the way the Falcons have collapsed this season, apparently ownership thinks that changes need to be made.

  • Duke Tobin, director of player personnel, Cincinnati Bengals: Like McClay, Tobin has already reached the scouting peak of an owner-driven operation. He's got a quiet way, but the talent in Cincy speaks for itself.

    ON THE WAY UP

    Scott Fitterer, co-director of player personnel, Seattle Seahawks: A great communicator and personality just promoted from college director who has helped John Schneider build an outrageously talented young core.

  • http://www.nfl.com/news/story/0ap3000000442679/article/nfl-general-manager-candidates-new-names-and-familiar-faces

NFL general manager candidates: new names and familiar faces

  • 0ap1000000208593.jpg
  • By Albert Breer
  • NFL Media reporter
  • Published: Dec. 12, 2014 at 01:30 p.m.
  • Updated: Dec. 12, 2014 at 03:17 p.m

NFL Media's Albert Breer touches on multiple topics in his robust Inside the NFL Notebook, including (click on each link to go directly to the topic):

»

And much more, beginning with the top GM candidates in a complex market. ...

Last season's NFL champion was coached by a man who once was fired by the Jets and later was canned by the Patriots. In the Super Bowl, he beat a coach who was fired by the Panthers. And that coach, to get to the big game, beat another coach who long ago was whacked by the Browns.

The point here? Forever, NFL wisdom has held that coaches can benefit long-term from getting the ax.

So why doesn't that go for general managers, as well?

We briefly addressed the question in this notebook a few weeks back. And in the time since, feedback from league folks has rolled in, flowing right into the time of year when my annual "Future General Managers" list runs.

The fact remains, Washington Redskins GM Bruce Allen is the only man in that position that has held the same title somewhere else, which is striking when you count up the nine NFL head coaches who are in second-chance situations, and even more amazing when you look at retread success stories like Ron Wolf, Ernie Accorsi, Bobby Beathard and Bill Polian.

"All these second-chance head coaches, you always hear, 'Well, they learned so much from the experience,' " one current general manager said. "It's like any other job. The second-chance head coaches -- (John) Fox, (Andy) Reid, (Bill) Belichick -- they are better for the experience. It's like Jay Gruden said, he didn't realize the enormity of the job when he took it. For a GM, you have to manage departments, assess value. It's bizarre to me that you wouldn't want someone with experience."

One NFC executive laid out three reasons for this to us:

1) In the past, there has been less turnover in GM jobs than with coaches.

2) There are fewer young GMs than young head coaches, so fewer go back into the cycle.

3) There's less of a natural progression back after being fired, where coaches can immediately rebuild their reputation as coordinators. (Ken Whisenhunt's arc from 2012 to '14 is a good example.)

The executive then speculated that things could change this year, because two of the above conditions have shifted. The cycle has accelerated -- so fewer GMs are getting second shots at hiring coaches or drafting quarterbacks -- and there are more front-office folks in their late 30s and early 40s. That means the market for a new GM -- and there could be a half-dozen or so teams seeking one in a few weeks -- is more complex than it's been.

So with that in mind, we're presenting our candidates for 2015 in two groups: the second-chancers and the first-timers:

SECOND-CHANCERS

Mark Dominik, ESPN analyst: Was a Buccaneers lifer before being shown the door at the end of last season, so Dominik was part of a championship group early on and built a team that still has young talent. His downfall as GM in Tampa Bay was striking out on his first draft pick -- quarterback Josh Freeman -- which seriously set the franchise back.

Tom Heckert, director of pro personnel, Denver Broncos: Something of a victim of circumstance in Cleveland, Heckert built the foundation for a contending Browns team -- and he sparkled as an evaluator prior to that in Philly. In Denver, the team's success in free agency says plenty about Heckert. He didhave a DUI arrest in 2013.

Jeff Ireland, consultant: Last year, CBS Dallas did a study, based on games played and starts, that ranked Miami as the NFL's top drafting team from 2009 to '13. And Ireland drafted Ryan Tannehillbetween Robert Griffin III and Brandon Weeden during that run. He wasn't perfect, but he was better than you think.

Scot McCloughan, consultant: McCloughan left Trent Baalke and, later, Jim Harbaugh with an incredibly talented team that made three straight NFC title games in San Francisco and was the righthand man to Seahawks GM John Schneider as Seattle became a champion. The Raiders could be a fit here.

Scott Pioli, assistant GM, Atlanta Falcons: Pioli's time in Kansas City carried off-field drama, but the on-field cupboard he left Andy Reid was fairly full. He drafted or re-signed nine Pro Bowl players in K.C. and left the new regime with $20 million in cap space. It wouldn't be shocking if the Jets inquired here.

Mike Tannenbaum, coaching agent: A hard run at a title after consecutive AFC title game appearances left the Jets in a tough spot after his ouster, but he got the team there in the first place and fostered an inclusive environment that people in that building have learned to appreciate in the two years since.

Brian Xanders, senior personnel executive, Detroit Lions: As Broncos GM, Xanders built the roster that lured Peyton Manning, with Demaryius Thomas among the franchise-level talents acquired. And in Detroit, he's spearheaded an effort to modernize the scouting operation and was part of a coaching search.

FIRST-TIMERS

Chris Ballard, director of player personnel, Kansas City Chiefs: Pulled his name out of the Tampa search last year, and he will probably be the first guy on a few lists. Has extensive experience in both college and pro scouting.

Nick Caserio, director of player personnel, New England Patriots: Many took his Dolphins interview in January as a signal that he's ready to seriously consider leaving Foxborough. Instrumental in Belichick's recent Patriot makeover.

Harrison: Power Rankings, Week 15
Eric DeCosta, assistant GM, Baltimore Ravens: Not a whole lot needs to be said about DeCosta, who has Ozzie Newsome's job waiting for him. It'd take a gold-standard gig (see: Giants) to pry him from that.

Brian Gaine, director of pro personnel, Houston Texans:Was a candidate for recent openings with the Rams, Jets andDolphins, and is a trusted voice in the building of the new Tom Gamble, vice president of player personnel, Philadelphia Eagles: Carries a big stick as an evaluator for Chip Kelly and played a major role in the Niners' recent revival. The Jets interviewed him in 2013 and could circle back.

Will McClay, assistant director of player personnel, Dallas Cowboys: McClay has ascended to the top of the personnel department in Dallas. And with the Cowboys' resurgence, he should become a hot name.

Terry McDonough, vice president of player personnel, Arizona Cardinals: Worked for Belichick in Cleveland and Newsome in Baltimore, and the Cardinals' success has restored his rep after some tough years in Jacksonville.

Rick Mueller, director of pro personnel, Philadelphia Eagles: Mueller's work has flown under the radar, but he's a valued voice in Philly. And he played a big role in putting Sean Payton's Saints in position to routinely contend.

Ryan Pace, director of player personnel, New Orleans Saints: You never hear much about Pace -- and that's by design. But he leads the personnel side under GM Mickey Loomis, and has drawn interest in the past.

Jon Robinson, director of player personnel, Tampa BayBuccaneers: Robinson spearheaded solid Patriots drafts in 2010, '11 and '12, and joined Tampa in May. Some believe he could eventually land in Houston.

Matt Russell, director of player personnel, Denver Broncos:Widely regarded as one of the NFL's best evaluators of college talent, Russell is a confidant of John Elway on all decisions. Like Heckert, he has a 2013 DUI to explain.

Duke Tobin, director of player personnel, Cincinnati Bengals: Like McClay, Tobin works in an owner-centric model, and has played a substantial role in stocking a very talented roster.

Lionel Vital, director of player personnel, Atlanta Falcons: A Tampa finalist last year, Vital occupies the spot that current GMs Les Snead and David Caldwell once filled. Like McDonough, has a Belichick/Newsome pedigree.

Eliot Wolf, director of pro personnel, Green Bay Packers: Ron Wolf's son would be very young (32) to be a GM, but he is considered a rising star in the business. The success of John Dorsey and Schneider certainly doesn't hurt.

Could you be more specific? LOL.... If your wish comes true and TD is toast, we must hit a home run here. It will have to be someone who can see the visions of both coordinators and the head coach as far as scheme and players...just not any player will do like TD seems to think with his "Diamond in the rough" theory. This move will have to be a grand slam and possibly add another 2 yrs for tweaking.

Black Monday is going to be full of drama and excitement.... as well as TATF.

-also, They have to be knowledgeable with the salary cap. We can't have a crash like NO had this past off-season and expect to be consistently competitive.

Edited by E. T.
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The playcalling and execution has been much better the last 2 games. Maybe he woke up a little .

This. I'm intrigued to see if another off-season with Matt getting more familiar with the everything, and perhaps an upgrade to the middle of our OL might show us.

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This slide that we have been on is clearly on the players. If you could not see the difference in the effort yesterday compared to passed Sundays you would have to be blind.

The Team decided that they weren't going to let Carolina embarrass them AGAIN!. They played with the Heart and effort they are capable of.

Its a shame that this teams seems to be lacking any self starters. The effort given yesterday would have beaten Tampa(twice)..beaten the Colts and several others.

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Could you be more specific? LOL.... If your wish comes true and TD is toast, we must hit a home run here. It will have to be someone who can see the visions of both coordinators and the head coach as far as scheme and players...just not any player will do like TD seems to think with his "Diamond in the rough" theory. This move will have to be a grand slam and possibly add another 2 yrs for tweaking.

Black Monday is going to be full of drama and excitement.... as well as TATF.

-also, They have to be knowledgeable with the salary cap. We can't have a crash like NO had this past off-season and expect to be consistently competitive.

I don't have any inside info. on which of these candidates would be the best for the job - read those articles and you will know as much as me.

I would think someone from the Seattle staff - Trent Kirchner or Scott Fitterer - would make sense as they would probably be best in tune with the type of players that Dan Quinn wants - especially on the defensive side of the ball - plus they would help establish the "Seattle SouthEast" culture that Dan Quinn wants as well - are those guys good at their job and worthy of being an NFL GM? I cannot answer that question - but they seem to be popular names.

I really like what the Bengals have done with their talent base over the last 5-6 years - does Duke Tobin deserve credit for some of it? probably - how much? I have no idea.

The Vikings have done a nice job building up their talent levels the last several years as well - Does George Paton (asst. GM-Vikes) deserve credit? probably - how much? I have no idea.

Sorry, wish I knew more but I won't pretend to know something that I don't.

If Arthur Blank strongly believes in Dan Quinn as his HC for more than just the next 2 years - then he probably wants to get somebody that Quinn wants as well.

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Just what Coaches son in the NFL has had success? Mike Shula?, but how many years did it take him to get to this point? I don't want to wait on KS learning on how to be an OC...the fact he had rated Coleman over Freeman? discarding Roddy? being a blowhard to the NFL when at 5-0 saying our 1st,2nd & 3rd target is Julio? Brings in a QB coach thats a few years older than Matt Ryan??? ZERO success in the NFL? OH, he has a daddy that won Super Bowls...you're not catching lightening in a bottle here!

Edited by Club212
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Um RG3, Matt Schaub

So the formula for this trope is as follows:

1) Kyle Shanahan used to coach a QB;

2) Said QB at some point after Shanahan leaves tanks into the crapper;

3) It's somehow Kyle Shanahan's fault.

Because otherwise, RGIII is a sketchy example, and Matt Schaub is ludicrous.

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So it was Shanny and not the repeated ACL injuries because he didn't know how to take a hit? IS that what you're tell me?

Two things RGIII and Schaubie have in common:

1) They had their best seasons under Shanahan's tutelage; and

2) Their careers tanked after Shanahan left.

Shanahan'd!

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Yeah, but our offense didn't have anything to do with their scoring. Our defense will not be able to stop a good offense. Our offense is putrid in the points arena.

It most definitely did by keeping them off the field. +11:16 on time of possession. Almost a quarter longer with the ball.
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