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Uninsured Rate Continues To Drop Since Obamacare Took Effect.


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21 minutes ago, lostone said:

This stems from America going to the individual and away from the community.  It takes a village to raise a kid, but now that village is just the house they are afraid to let their kid out of.

 

I really do not like Reagan, or Bill for that matter

it doesnt take a village that is some marxist brainwashing. The keys to installing a communist despot is 1. Destroy christianity 2. Destroy the family 3. Kill everyone that doesnt fit into the box.

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10 minutes ago, Flip Flop said:

This is hogwash.  It takes parents to raise a kid.  You can spend as much money as you want and pretend to take that responsibility on as a state, but parents are the critical factor in raising children.  The reason the demographic groups that outperform the rest do so well is that those parents take personal responsibility for their children.  

So where did these communities go wrong?  Where did it start?  Help me understand.

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1 hour ago, kicker said:

That is an absolute cop-out.  They don't have to be more expensive.  I can feed a family of four for less than the cost of dinner at McDonalds.  

You can.  What a I am saying is some foods geared towards health are more expensive.  On the other hand you can feed a lot of people on ramen noodles as well.  Let's not pretend that coming out of the grocery store with say two bags, being affordable for the poor either.  I wasn't talking about fast food either.  There is always choices, take Walmart's groceries, they are way more affordable than the large chain supermarkets.  Yet they get lambasted by the very people that could be helped in the poor communities, and in some instances turned away from building their stores in those communities.  

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37 minutes ago, lostone said:

So where did these communities go wrong?  Where did it start?  Help me understand.

It doesnt matter.  What I think matters even less.  People don't improve their lives because people who have little to nothing to do with them understand their plight.  People improve their lives by living better.  Best to focus on helping people.  Better yet focus on helping individuals, because people aren't groups, they are individuals.

 I grew up poor and destitute.  Dwelling on how my circumstances occurred did not make any difference to my getting out.  I worked.  I pursued education.  I moved.  I left that life behind me.  This is the recipe that I would suggest to anyone who wants out of any bad circumstance.  Firstly, you have to accept that you are the author of your own destiny.  The only realization that genuinely changed my direction was realizing that no matter how my circumstances came to be, it was up to me to change it.  Essentially I was mad at my parents for such colossal failure, but I came to see that understanding my obstacles meant that I was responsible for overcoming them.  

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40 minutes ago, Flip Flop said:

This is hogwash.  It takes parents to raise a kid.  You can spend as much money as you want and pretend to take that responsibility on as a state, but parents are the critical factor in raising children.  The reason the demographic groups that outperform the rest do so well is that those parents take personal responsibility for their children.  

You're not wrong about parents being the critical factor in raising children, but you are overlooking the importance of community/environment in raising a child.  Even the greatest parents in the world can't hover over their children 24-7.

Just as an example, since we are on a sports board, Richard Sherman had excellent parents by any measure, but both of them worked full-time jobs and he'll tell you himself that he and his brother would have been swallowed up by the streets of Compton if he didn't have people looking out for them.  Because everyone knew everyone in the neighborhood and respected his parents the O.G.s made sure to steer him and his brother away gangs, made sure they didn't get into anything remotely shady.

I can't speak for lostone's point, but when people say "It takes a village" that is the kind of thing they are talking about.  When it comes to economically disadvantaged neightborhoods, a sense of community i.e. looking out for one another is the only thing that holds it all together.

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3 minutes ago, PeytonMannings Forehead said:

You're not wrong about parents being the critical factor in raising children, but you are overlooking the importance of community/environment in raising a child.  Even the greatest parents in the world can't hover over their children 24-7.

Just as an example, since we are on a sports board, Richard Sherman had excellent parents by any measure, but both of them worked full-time jobs and he'll tell you himself that he and his brother would have been swallowed up by the streets of Compton if he didn't have people looking out for them.  Because everyone knew everyone in the neighborhood and respected his parents the O.G.s made sure to steer him and his brother away gangs, made sure they didn't get into anything remotely shady.

I can't speak for lostone's point, but when people say "It takes a village" that is the kind of thing they are talking about.  When it comes to economically disadvantaged neightborhoods, a sense of community i.e. looking out for one another is the only thing that holds it all together.

You make my point.  Richard Sherman's father still works as a garbage man, because he isn't going to mooch off of his sons success.  I don't know about you, but that kind of self determination tends to lead by example. I wonder how many kids in that city have the talent to move on in life, but lack the kind of leadership that Shermans dad provided in his life.  Good parents = unfair advantage in life.

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5 minutes ago, kicker said:

The biggest difference between healthy food and unhealthy food is the time it takes to get each.  Eating healthy takes preparation and education.  Neither of those things require access or increased cost, they simply require effort.  

My grandmother probably produced upwards of 80% of her own food.  She kept a garden all her life until she became too frail to tend it.  She died several years ago and I bet that my family still has jars of tomatoes, pickles, green beans, peach pie filling, etc.. from her gardens in our pantries.

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1 minute ago, Flip Flop said:

You make my point.  Richard Sherman's father still works as a garbage man, because he isn't going to mooch off of his sons success.  I don't know about you, but that kind of self determination tends to lead by example. I wonder how many kids in that city have the talent to move on in life, but lack the kind of leadership that Shermans dad provided in his life.  Good parents = unfair advantage in life.

And you missed my point.  I'm not discounting the great example his father set.  That is an absolutely vital component, but so is the community.  From his own words, Sherman will tell you he would have been eaten up by the streets and fell into something that would have derailed his future if it hadn't been for those in the community that made sure he stayed on the straight and narrow.

He's said this himself.  Gang member used to shoo him and his brother away; wouldn't even let them stand and watch a game of dice.  Wouldn't let them get close to anything even remotely shady.

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10 minutes ago, PeytonMannings Forehead said:

And you missed my point.  I'm not discounting the great example his father set.  That is an absolutely vital component, but so is the community.  From his own words, Sherman will tell you he would have been eaten up by the streets and fell into something that would have derailed his future if it hadn't been for those in the community that made sure he stayed on the straight and narrow.

He's said this himself.  Gang member used to shoo him and his brother away; wouldn't even let them stand and watch a game of dice.  Wouldn't let them get close to anything even remotely shady.

Im not against people working together as communities, but how many kids with talent grow up in those neighborhoods that the gangs force to jump in?  Is it because of Shermans parents that he was different? If that community is so solid, where are the other great success stories?  Richard Sherman is a better ambassador for turning the community of Compton around than I could ever be, but it takes real individuals helping real individuals.  Sure communities have their own compositions.  However, you don't need a village of well meaning parents fighting against a larger community of risk to overcome being poor.  

If i were to wake up in the body of person living in some rotten neighborhood like where I grew up.  I would just leave.  I would pack up everything that I had a get out. If I didn't have a car, I would walk my *** right the **** out of there.  I might not even take the time to make a plan.  Your children can't get mixed up in a gang if they don't know any gangsters.

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On a side note.  Growing up the way I did, I seem to have an affinity for people like me.  Without any intent, I regularly hire people who came from similar circumstances.  In the past year I have hired three people who among them grew up in gang ridden neighborhoods, had alcoholic idiot parents, struggled with petty police issues as young adults, and more. 

This isn't why I hire them.  I hire people based on their attitude, ambition and experience.  I guess people who come from nothing and get somewhere tend to have the kind of self motivation that I prefer in employees.

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Nov. 17, 2009

By Jeffrey S. Flier, dean of Harvard Medical School 

Quote

Our health-care system suffers from problems of cost, access and quality, and needs major reform. Tax policy drives employment-based insurance; this begets overinsurance and drives costs upward while creating inequities for the unemployed and self-employed. A regulatory morass limits innovation. And deep flaws in Medicare and Medicaid drive spending without optimizing care.

Speeches and news reports can lead you to believe that proposed congressional legislation would tackle the problems of cost, access and quality. But that's not true. The various bills do deal with access by expanding Medicaid and mandating subsidized insurance at substantial cost—and thus addresses an important social goal. However, there are no provisions to substantively control the growth of costs or raise the quality of care. So the overall effort will fail to qualify as reform.

In discussions with dozens of health-care leaders and economists, I find near unanimity of opinion that, whatever its shape, the final legislation that will emerge from Congress will markedly accelerate national health-care spending rather than restrain it. Likewise, nearly all agree that the legislation would do little or nothing to improve quality or change health-care's dysfunctional delivery system. The system we have now promotes fragmented care and makes it more difficult than it should be to assess outcomes and patient satisfaction. The true costs of health care are disguised, competition based on price and quality are almost impossible, and patients lose their ability to be the ultimate judges of value.

Worse, currently proposed federal legislation would undermine any potential for real innovation in insurance and the provision of care. It would do so by overregulating the health-care system in the service of special interests such as insurance companies, hospitals, professional organizations and pharmaceutical companies, rather than the patients who should be our primary concern.

In effect, while the legislation would enhance access to insurance, the trade-off would be an accelerated crisis of health-care costs and perpetuation of the current dysfunctional system—now with many more participants. This will make an eventual solution even more difficult. Ultimately, our capacity to innovate and develop new therapies would suffer most of all.

 

Health 'Reform' Gets a Failing Grade 

 

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6 minutes ago, Flip Flop said:

Im not against people working together as communities, but how many kids with talent grow up in those neighborhoods that the gangs force to jump in?  Is it because of Shermans parents that he was different? If that community is so solid, where are the other great success stories?  Richard Sherman is a better ambassador for turning the community of Compton around than I could ever be, but it takes real individuals helping real individuals.  Sure communities have their own compositions.  However, you don't need a village of well meaning parents fighting against a larger community of risk to overcome being poor.  

If i were to wake up in the body of person living in some rotten neighborhood like where I grew up.  I would just leave.  I would pack up everything that I had a get out. If I didn't have a car, I would walk my *** right the **** out of there.  I might not even take the time to make a plan.  Your children can't get mixed up in a gang if they don't know any gangsters.

Yeah, if you were to wake up in the body of a person living in the rotten area you grew up in I'm sure you would haul ***, but that's because you know better.  You've got perspective.

I don't know you, and I'm not going to pretend to infer anything about your upbringing, but I am willing to bet you that somewhere along the line in your youth you saw that you could do better, that your life didn't have to be whatever hole you were living in, and that was enough for you.  Either it was an example you observed, or someone taking an interest in you or whatever.

Not everyone has that perspective.  You can only do better if you know better and far too many people in these areas don't see anything beyond the few blocks of bull*** that they grow up in and the only mentors they have have are the fools that keep them in the same ridiculous cycle.

Now are parents the most important part of the formula in breaking that cycle?  Absolutely.  But so is community.  If you got a mother or father that'll simple walk the **** out of a poor neighborhood, more power to 'em.  But in practical application, it's never that easy when bills have to be paid and mouths have to be fed. 

I thought the same exact thing when saw all those folks in New Orleans during Hurricane Katrina.  Then I started meeting some of them for myself.  The answer is always a lot more nuanced.

 

Just as an aside... Compton has had more than it's share of success stories, from athletes to entertainers, to business people.  I just used Richard Sherman as an obvious example.   

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10 minutes ago, PeytonMannings Forehead said:

Yeah, if you were to wake up in the body of a person living in the rotten area you grew up in I'm sure you would haul ***, but that's because you know better.  You've got perspective.

I don't know you, and I'm not going to pretend to infer anything about your upbringing, but I am willing to bet you that somewhere along the line in your youth you saw that you could do better, that your life didn't have to be whatever hole you were living in, and that was enough for you.  Either it was an example you observed, or someone taking an interest in you or whatever.

Not everyone has that perspective.  You can only do better if you know better and far too many people in these areas don't see anything beyond the few blocks of bull*** that they grow up in and the only mentors they have have are the fools that keep them in the same ridiculous cycle.

Now are parents the most important part of the formula in breaking that cycle?  Absolutely.  But so is community.  If you got a mother or father that'll simple walk the **** out of a poor neighborhood, more power to 'em.  But in practical application, it's never that easy when bills have to be paid and mouths have to be fed. 

I thought the same exact thing when saw all those folks in New Orleans during Hurricane Katrina.  Then I started meeting some of them for myself.  The answer is always a lot more nuanced.

 

Just as an aside... Compton has had more than it's share of success stories, from athletes to entertainers, to business people.  I just used Richard Sherman as an obvious example.   

I was riding in the car with a guy that got pulled over for speeding once.  We weren't going any faster than all the cars around us.  Everybody was just cruising at about ten miles over the speed limit.  When the cop came to the window, my friend said as much and asked why he was the one that got pulled over.  The cop said, "I can't pull them all over."  

Life isn't fair.  You aren't going to help people out of their situation if they don't want to help themselves.  Just because someone grew up in poverty does mean they don't know how to want a better life.  

Like I said earlier.  It doesnt matter what I think.  The people of Compton wouldn't accept my help if I offered it to them. That doesn't change the fact that I know how to get out and it doesnt change the fact that you have to get yourself out or your just trading one master for another.

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42 minutes ago, Flip Flop said:

On a side note.  Growing up the way I did, I seem to have an affinity for people like me.  Without any intent, I regularly hire people who came from similar circumstances.  In the past year I have hired three people who among them grew up in gang ridden neighborhoods, had alcoholic idiot parents, struggled with petty police issues as young adults, and more. 

This isn't why I hire them.  I hire people based on their attitude, ambition and experience.  I guess people who come from nothing and get somewhere tend to have the kind of self motivation that I prefer in employees.

My brother, we are actually in agreement more than you realize.

 

Why do you have an affinity for people like you?  Why do you hire people who came from similar circumstances... or had police issues as you put it... which is usually a non-starter with a lot of employers?  That's a key one; hiring people with past criminal issues, because that's where most who want to do better hit the wall.

It's because deep down you recognize that despite the rugged individualist ideals that we all romanticize, that we all need a break... we all need a touch of good fortune... for someone to give us a chance.  If you didn't, you wouldn't have an affinity for "those types of people" as you put it.  But you do because you realize how hard it is to make it out and how special that type of determination is.

And that is community.  What you do as an employer is along the same thread that I am talking about when I say "looking out for someone".  Now maybe in a tacid way you're getting in the mind that I'm talking charity of some sort, but not at all.  It's simply the recognition that at some point we all need someone to look out for us, take interest in us, or simply give us an opportunity.

Now that opportunity may come by way of a teacher taking a special interest in a student, a baseball coach giving a poor kid a glove, or an employer overlooking a young man's past mistakes and giving him an opportunity at a job.

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That is beautifully told Peyton.  I could not convey it any better.  You will do what you do based on things you have experienced.  Life truly is not fair.  No reason to make it worse.  

 

Currenly in rural NC visiting my InLaws.  It's like going back in time.  Fortunately it doesn't cost much to live here, but it's a dead textile area.  So jobs are slim.

I wonder why people don't just abandon these towns and move where there are better opportunities /sarcasm 

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  • 2 weeks later...
11 minutes ago, Billy Ocean said:
"Either Obamacare will include a universally-available, non-profit public option, or it will eventually expire. There is no third way."
 
tru.gif

 

Let it expire, which that piece of mess should.  Going for the public option (which is their intent all along) would be a bigger disaster than the ACA.

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2 hours ago, WhenFalconsWin said:

Let it expire, which that piece of mess should.  Going for the public option (which is their intent all along) would be a bigger disaster than the ACA.

I can't wait to go back to the old way.  I'll be okay.  But hey, if you can't afford insurance and your kid gets sick and you can't pay, too bad.  Better luck next time. Make more money.  Oh you had insurance , but they dropped you when   You needed it.  Oh well

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