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Atlanta Falcons Full Position Breakdown & Depth Chart Analysis At Defensive Line


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The Falcons defense needs to see improvement along the defensive line. Atlanta's interior defensive line positions—strong-side defensive end, nose tackle, under tackle and nickel interior pass rushers—are going to be fought through some very competitive battles.

While high-round draft pick Ra'Shede Hageman and big-name free agents Tyson Jackson and Paul Soliai look to be in the mix for starting positions right now, long-time Falcon Jonathan Babineaux and 2013 fourth-round pick Malliciah Goodman could be dark horses for starting roles. Also, don't count out 2014 free agent signing Adrian Clayborn.

Role: Starting Under Tackle

Ra'Shede Hageman is a physical specimen who had his ups-and-downs in 2014. He had times when he just didn't look like he knew what was going on or what his assignment was. That should change a ton under head coach Dan Quinn's much more simplified scheme.

Hageman will be asked to play primarily a one-gapping, penetrating under-tackle role out of a 3-technique on the weak side of the formation. This should be for the best. Hageman has been most effective when he can be one-on-one with an offensive guard using his power and sheer force to knock them out of the way.

Role: Starting Nose Tackle

Paul Soliai was brought in before the 2014 season to be a clogger in the middle of the field. That shouldn't change in 2015 under Dan Quinn. He'll be asked to play in a 1-technique on the strong side most of the time meaning that he should occupy a center and a guard.

With Soliai eating up blockers and Hageman creating havoc on the other side of the center, the linebackers should have many more open lanes to hit the running backs behind the line. On top of that, if Soliai is eating blockers on the inside of the formation, it should free up the ends into more one-on-one pass rush situations.

Role: Starting Strong-Side Defensive End

This was the weakest link of the 2014 defensive line. It should be much better in 2015 with Adrian Clayborn manning the position. He's been a very good pass rusher in the NFL thus-far, but he's been plagued by injuries during the early parts of his career.

2015 will hopefully be different. And despite being injury prone early in his career, the Falcons could wind up with a truly talented strong-side end out of Clayborn. He's very similar to Michael Bennett in a lot of ways and could be the steal of free agency's 2015 class.

Role: Competing for Rotational Pass Rush Role

Jonathan Babineaux is the second-longest tenured Falcon by just a couple of hours. He's been a Falcon for a decade now and will likely finish his career in Atlanta. He's also declining from his former fringe-Pro Bowl talent that he had for years.

And that's ok. But at 33—he turns 34 in October, the Falcons should use him in a rotational role. Babineaux would be best coming in on pass rushing situations where he can play in a 3-technique and attack quarterbacks. That's where his strength is at this point and time.

Role: Competing for Rotational Pass Rush Role

Grady Jarrett was a steal in the fifth round for the Falcons. The son of Falcons legend Jesse Tuggle should compete for a spot in rotation with Jonathan Babineaux this year. Even if he doesn't earn a ton of playing time in a pass rushing role, he should still see time spelling Paul Soliai at the 1-technique.

Jarrett is an ideal fit for Dan Quinn's scheme as a 1-technique nose tackle due to his ability to penetrate the interior and eat up blockers if he's causing too much trouble. The Falcons should see him fill out in his frame a bit more as well to get closer to a Brandon Mebane-sized player when all is said and done.

Role: Competing for Reserve Role at Strong-Side Defensive End

In this new scheme under Dan Quinn, a role for Tyson Jackson doesn't look like something that will be available. He might be able to earn a spot as a rotational strong-side defensive end or a goalline-package player for the 2015 season.

After that, however, it would be shocking to see Jackson on the Falcons. He's just not a great fit for the new scheme and likely won't be able to beat out Adrian Clayborn or Malliciah Goodman for a starting or rotational role without completely changing who he is as a player.

Role: Competing for a Reserve Role at Starting Strong-side End

Malliciah Goodman is one of the most underrated players in the Falcons defensive line rotation. After bulking up too big in 2014 and playing more of a defensive tackle-style role, Goodman has lost weight to get back down to his college weight of 270 and will play end in 2015.

This should help him get back to his true form. Goodman played a role almost identical to Dan Quinn's Michael Bennett role when Goodman was in college. He is at his best when he can line up on the strong-side, set the edge and attack the quarterback from that spot.

Role: Competing for a roster spot

A long-time Special Teams addition to the roster, Cliff Matthews can play either the edge roles or the interior defensive line roles. In the new scheme, he'll be very important to the depth along the line as well. But the question is whether he can earn a roster spot.

The Falcons would likely have to keep at least 7 interior defensive linemen for him to have a shot. Then he'd have to beat out Tyson Jackson or Malliciah Goodman for that final spot. On top of that, he'll have to show that he can learn the new scheme and be more than just a pure run defender in the scheme.

Role: Competing for a roster spot

Behind Paul Soliai, the Falcons don't really have anyone with a massive frame. Sure, Ra'Shede Hageman and Tyson Jackson have the ability to play the 1-technique, but it wouldn't be close to their best role. Grady Jarrett also doesn't have the size compared to Soliai either.

Because of that, Joey Mbu stands a shot at making the roster. Mbu is 6'3", 315 pounds and has long 35" arms that would allow him to keep distance between him and an offensive guard. He's also quick off the snap. He stands an outside shot at a roster spot should the Falcons keep seven defensive linemen.

Role: Competing for a roster spot

Unlike Joey Mbu, Ricky Havili-Heimuli looks like he's just going to be in camp to take some snaps and keep guys rested. His highest potential is as a practice squad player again. He isn't the ideal athlete up front that the Falcons want and isn't good with his techniwue, either.

Role: Competing for a roster spot

Warren Herring is a very unique situation. He could be a guy who will pop off the ball in camp and show some potential as a 3-technique. But his film doesn't show that ability now. His ideal role is in a 3-4 as an end eating blockers, not as a 4-3 defensive tackle.

http://bleacherreport.com/articles/2501879-atlanta-falcons-full-position-breakdown-depth-chart-analysis-at-defensive-line

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Role: Competing for Reserve Role at Strong-Side Defensive End


In this new scheme under Dan Quinn, a role for Tyson Jackson doesn't look like something that will be available. He might be able to earn a spot as a rotational strong-side defensive end or a goalline-package player for the 2015 season.



After that, however, it would be shocking to see Jackson on the Falcons. He's just not a great fit for the new scheme and likely won't be able to beat out Adrian Clayborn or Malliciah Goodman for a starting or rotational role without completely changing who he is as a player.




Similar to my thoughts on Jackson. Not sure he makes the cut.


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So much fail in this article, as expected.

Role: Starting Strong-Side Defensive End

This was the weakest link of the 2014 defensive line. (No. For one thing, this position in it's current form didn't exist on the DLine in 2014. Second, a lack of outside pass rush was the weakest link.) It should be much better in 2015 with Adrian Clayborn manning the position. He's been a very good pass rusher in the NFL thus-far, but he's been plagued by injuries during the early parts of his career. (Except that Jackson is probably still slated as the starting 5-tech DE, since he's built similarly to Red Bryant - 6'4" 323 lbs - who held that position for years in Seattle, until free agency took him away for the 2014 season which led to Bennett starting there for all of one year. It remains to be seen if the move to a more Bennett sized DE was by Quinn's choice or forced due to the loss of Bryant. As I discussed in futher detail here --> http://boards.atlantafalcons.com/topic/4029664-4-3-under-player-types-defensive-line/?p=9431797

2015 will hopefully be different. And despite being injury prone early in his career, the Falcons could wind up with a truly talented strong-side end out of Clayborn. He's very similar to Michael Bennett in a lot of ways and could be the steal of free agency's 2015 class. (It still seems more likely that Clayborn will play the Bennett role of 2013, and not the Bennett role of 2014. That role was as a rotational DE in nickel situations where it could still be run or pass, and as an interior pass rusher on obvious passing downs. That year Bennett played less than 60% of defensive snaps, which still led all D Linemen in % of snaps played, even while not starting a game that year. He played almost no snaps in the base defense, because Bryant did. Seattle rotated DL's heavily in 2013 when they had the players to do so. They were forced to play Bennett and Avril more snaps in 2014 after losing players in free agency. Jackson being almost guaranteed a roster spot due to his salary, and his similarity to Bryant who started in the base defense for years, makes it much more plausible we will start Jackson in base defense in order to get some use out of him, and also save Clayborn for a more valuable pass rushing role like I laid out above.)

Role: Competing for Rotational Pass Rush Role

Jonathan Babineaux is the second-longest tenured Falcon by just a couple of hours. He's been a Falcon for a decade now and will likely finish his career in Atlanta. He's also declining from his former fringe-Pro Bowl talent that he had for years.

And that's ok. But at 33—he turns 34 in October, the Falcons should use him in a rotational role. Babineaux would be best coming in on pass rushing situations where he can play in a 3-technique and attack quarterbacks. That's where his strength is at this point and time. (Quinn has already said that Babs and Clayborn will be getting the 1st shot at the interior DT roles in the obvious pass rushing package - the NASCAR package. Training camp will sort this out, obviously.)

Role: Competing for Rotational Pass Rush Role

Grady Jarrett was a steal in the fifth round for the Falcons. The son of Falcons legend Jesse Tuggle should compete for a spot in rotation with Jonathan Babineaux this year. Even if he doesn't earn a ton of playing time in a pass rushing role, he should still see time spelling Paul Soliai at the 1-technique. (I've already talked in detail in other threads why Jarrett won't be backing up Soliai in the base defense. In the nickel package, possibly, because the role is different then. If anyone disagrees then we'll see during the season wont we.)

Jarrett is an ideal fit for Dan Quinn's scheme as a 1-technique nose tackle due to his ability to penetrate the interior and eat up blockers if he's causing too much trouble. (Except Quinn already said otherwise.) The Falcons should see him fill out in his frame a bit more as well to get closer to a Brandon Mebane-sized player when all is said and done. (That would mean Jarrett putting on about 25 more pounds. I'm not saying he won't ever be asked to do that in future years. But a good 3-tech is harder to find than a 1-tech NT. Babs probably only has 1 year left. The future should be Hageman starting in base D at the 3-tech, and Jarrett as one of the nickel and NASCAR interior pass rushers once Babs retires. I would only attempt to convert Jarrett to 1-tech and bulking him up, only after proving he can't handle the 3-tech role - exactly as what happened to Mebane. He failed at 3-tech for Seattle in 2010, so they bulked him up and converted him to 1-tech, where he has found success.)

Role: Competing for Reserve Role at Strong-Side Defensive End

In this new scheme under Dan Quinn, a role for Tyson Jackson doesn't look like something that will be available. He might be able to earn a spot as a rotational strong-side defensive end or a goalline-package player for the 2015 season. (It should be obvious by now why this paragraph is foolish and incorrect.)

After that, however, it would be shocking to see Jackson on the Falcons. He's just not a great fit for the new scheme and likely won't be able to beat out Adrian Clayborn or Malliciah Goodman for a starting or rotational role without completely changing who he is as a player.

Role: Competing for a Reserve Role at Starting Strong-side End

Malliciah Goodman is one of the most underrated players in the Falcons defensive line rotation. After bulking up too big in 2014 and playing more of a defensive tackle-style role, Goodman has lost weight to get back down to his college weight of 270 and will play end in 2015. (When will people get this right? Goodman has been asked to drop 25 pounds. He weighed 290. that would put him at 265 lbs - the exact same weight as Seattle's current LEO, Cliff Avril. And also lighter than anyone they've ever tried at 5-tech DE. It should be painfully obvious that Goodman won't even sniff the 5-tech DE spot in the base defense, and is instead moving to a LEO type player in base, and an edge speed rusher in nickel packages. I've even suggested that Goodman has a chance to win the starting LEO job in the base defense, which would allow Beasley to stay fresh and rotate in on passing downs, taking advantage of his superior pass rushing skills. Goodman is probably competing with Biermann for that duty, if that scenario does play out.)

This should help him get back to his true form. Goodman played a role almost identical to Dan Quinn's Michael Bennett role when Goodman was in college. He is at his best when he can line up on the strong-side, set the edge and attack the quarterback from that spot. (The strong side DE doesn't set the edge in this base defense, the Strong side Linebacker does...Why am I not surprised this author doesn't know that.)

Role: Competing for a roster spot

A long-time Special Teams addition to the roster, Cliff Matthews can play either the edge roles or the interior defensive line roles. In the new scheme, he'll be very important to the depth along the line as well. But the question is whether he can earn a roster spot.

The Falcons would likely have to keep at least 7 interior defensive linemen for him to have a shot. Then he'd have to beat out Tyson Jackson or Malliciah Goodman for that final spot. On top of that, he'll have to show that he can learn the new scheme and be more than just a pure run defender in the scheme. (After moving Goodman to an Edge position, where he is competing for one of those likely 5 positions, yes Matthews would have to beat out one of Babs, Jarrett, or Jackson for a roster spot. Seattle has never kept more than 6 big DL's, and often only goes with 5. I expect we'll keep 6, unless Matthews is kept as a 7th DL primarily for special teams.)

Role: Competing for a roster spot

Behind Paul Soliai, the Falcons don't really have anyone with a massive frame. Sure, Ra'Shede Hageman and Tyson Jackson have the ability to play the 1-technique, but it wouldn't be close to their best role. Grady Jarrett also doesn't have the size compared to Soliai either.

Because of that, Joey Mbu stands a shot at making the roster. Mbu is 6'3", 315 pounds and has long 35" arms that would allow him to keep distance between him and an offensive guard. He's also quick off the snap. He stands an outside shot at a roster spot should the Falcons keep seven defensive linemen. (Practice squad.)

Role: Competing for a roster spot

Unlike Joey Mbu, Ricky Havili-Heimuli looks like he's just going to be in camp to take some snaps and keep guys rested. His highest potential is as a practice squad player again. He isn't the ideal athlete up front that the Falcons want and isn't good with his techniwue, either.

Role: Competing for a roster spot

Warren Herring is a very unique situation. He could be a guy who will pop off the ball in camp and show some potential as a 3-technique. But his film doesn't show that ability now. His ideal role is in a 3-4 as an end eating blockers, not as a 4-3 defensive tackle.

Edited by RandomFan
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Role: Competing for Rotational Pass Rush Role

Grady Jarrett was a steal in the fifth round for the Falcons. The son of Falcons legend Jesse Tuggle should compete for a spot in rotation with Jonathan Babineaux this year. Even if he doesn't earn a ton of playing time in a pass rushing role, he should still see time spelling Paul Soliai at the 1-technique. (I've already talked in detail in other threads why Jarrett won't be backing up Soliai in the base defense. In the nickel package, possibly, because the role is different then. If anyone disagrees then we'll see during the season wont we.)

He certainly better be allowed to compete for a spot in the rotation. If not then WTF is the point?

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He certainly better be allowed to compete for a spot in the rotation. If not then WTF is the point?

First of all, nowhere in what I said there suggested he wont be given a shot to compete in "a" rotation. What I did say is that he wont be competing at the 1-tech in the base defense, as I've thoroughly explained in multiple other threads.

As Dirtybird56 said in this post: http://boards.atlantafalcons.com/topic/4029664-4-3-under-player-types-defensive-line/?p=9432084

Unless someone gets injured Im not sure Jarrett sees much of any time on the field this season.. 2 legit guys at 3tech in front of him in Babs and Hageman. Not a bad thing, as he can use this year to adjust to the NFL game in his limited snaps and come in next year ready to roll as this is Babs last season likely

And I responded with:

Yep. And agree on Jarrett. Although someone always gets dinged up or injured. So I'm sure he'll at least get his feet wet this season.

And second, we're talking about a 5th rounder here, not a 1st rounder. While I and many others think he was a steal and we all hope he turns into a real player for us, let's not get this twisted like a 5th rounder is expected to come in and be a difference maker for us his rookie year. He'll be given a shot to compete for exactly what I said. An open competition for the starting 3-tech job on the base defense that is expected to be won by Hageman, but obviously training camp will decide that. And he'll be competing to get on the field in the nickel interior pass rushing packages with Babs and Clayborn, and perhaps Hageman if he doesn't win the starting 3-tech job in base defense.

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So much fail in this article, as expected.

I enjoy reading your posts a lot. You definitely seem to have a good handle on this defense. The one question I have with your interpretation is Joey Mbu. Seems strange that we would keep three 3-techs and only one 1-tech on the Active Roster.

Now, I can see that Tyson could possibly have played back-up as the 1 tech also, but he has lost a lot of weight supposedly which would indicate (like you mentioned) that he'll probably have a large role as Strongside 5-tech on rush downs. So, following that train of thought, we don't have anyone to spell Solai to help keep him fresher. Because of that, I see Mbu having a decent shot to make the active roster if he's as good as some of these camp observation posts were making him out to be.

What are your thoughts?

Edited by dfsutton
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I enjoy reading your posts a lot. You definitely seem to have a good handle on this defense. The one question I have with your interpretation is Joey Mbu. Seems strange that we would keep three 3-techs and only one 1-tech on the Active Roster.

Now, I can see that Tyson could possibly have played back-up as the 1 tech also, but he has lost a lot of weight supposedly which would indicate (like you mentioned) that he'll probably have a large role as Strongside 5-tech on rush downs. So, following that train of thought, we don't have anyone to spell Solai to help keep him fresher. Because of that, I see Mbu having a decent shot to make the active roster if he's as good as some of these camp observation posts were making him out to be.

What are your thoughts?

There are several variables that went into this decision for me.

One of them is that the 1-tech in the base defense is probably only going to play around 50% of the defensive snaps. The base 1-tech is pulled in most nickel and every nascar package. Which in essence serves to spell that player and keep them as fresh as possible. Soliai has consistently handled a similar type of workload, or more, for his entire career. Outside of him being injured, he shouldn't need a direct backup for his job during the course of a game. So while it might seem strange to only keep one true base defense 1-tech that is a beast versus the run, it is made less strange considering it is a role limited to one position along the D Line and is also mainly played in the base defense. However, do not take that to mean it is a less valued role. It most definitely is a hugely important role because stopping the run is the first and foremost responsibility of the defense. If you don't stop the run, then you don't get the pass rushing situations, nor ever get off the field.

Also, the three 3-tech's have an opportunity for more playing time than the base 1-tech provides. There is the starting 3-tech in the base defense. But there also are the two interior pass rushing roles in all sorts of nickel and nascar packages that some combination of Babs, Jarrett, Clayborn, and sometimes Hageman will have to fill.

Another variable is the practice squad. Simply having the practice squad available allows us to have a backup 1-tech on the team that gets training and practice with us. As I said, the only time we'd need a replacement or sub for Soliai in a game is if he's injured. Stashing our backup 1-tech on the practice squad allows us to activate that player and have him available for the next game if Soliai were to go down with an injury. Obviously, we'd need to finish out the game he injures himself in. But we could do that by having any combination of Hageman, Jackson, or even Jarrett or Babineaux play that spot to finish out one game.

Just look at how Seattle handled it last year. They didn't have a true backup 1-tech either when Mebane went down for the season. But they did have Kevin Williams who was brought in to share snaps at the 3-tech with McDaniel, play some 5-tech in place of the departed Red Bryant, and some DT in nickel. That plan was scrapped when Mebane went down. Williams was big and strong enough that they finished out the season with him playing 1-tech, though there was an obvious drop off from Mebane. In a perfect world, we'd have a player like that as a backup. But, we have who we have.

Which brings me to my last variable - our personell. The big issue is the 3-tech position. Seattle tried for years to find even one good 3-tech, and finally did so in McDaniel in 2013 - in their 4th year of trying. It is the most difficult position to find on the D Line. And we have THREE of them, potentially - depending on how well Jarrett actually performs, and if Hageman continues to improve like we all hope. Babs is the most proven commodity, but he's probably in his last season. We don't want to get rid of him just yet though due to the inexperience of both Hageman and Jarrett.

We also have to consider the amount of roster spots we will have for these big bodied DL types (275 and up). If we follow what Seattle has typically done, and all indications are we will, then we will carry no less than 5 and no more than 6. With the aging Babs hanging on for one more year, surrounded by youth that needs development, my bet is we'll go with 6. Babs, Hageman, and Jarrett give us 3 of those 6 already. Obviously Soliai makes it 4. That gives us our starting 1-tech, 3-tech, and some nickel pass rushing DT's.

But we haven't filled our 5-tech DE spot yet. As I said before, Goodman isn't included in this grouping; he'll be battling for one of the likely 5 Edge rusher spots with the other under 265ish OLB/DE types. This leaves us with 2 open spots for Jackson, Clayborn, Matthews, Mbu, Heimuli, Herring, and Meredith. Other than injury concerns, Clayborn is almost a lock as he's a versatile lineman that will prove very valuable inside and outside in nickel and nascar packages.

Jackson is almost a lock as long as he shows up to camp in shape and isn't just ridiculously awful. And here are the two main reason's why.

1) His contract is almost uncuttable as long as the player is providing even backup quality performance. Cutting him free's up almost no money on our cap. We're going to be paying him millions whether he is on the roster or if we cut him. As long as he's at minimum a decent backup, you don't throw money away and turn around and have to spend more money again on an equally competent backup to fill his spot. The only way it would make sense to cut him is if he is so overmatched in camp that even a borderline scrub backup can clearly beat him out. And I do admit that is a possiblilty - just not a likely possibility.

2) Contrary to the opinions of some, Jackson actually fits the 5-tech role in the base defense like a glove. Depending on if Quinn is actually altering the role of the 5-tech, then Jackson might have less value in that case. But consider this: Quinn is known for putting his players in a position to succeed. Jackson is nearly uncuttable as I've said above. It behooves Quinn to find a role for a player that is a near lock to be on the team. His best role by far is as the 5-tech in the old Red Bryant role. Plus, he's proven durable, unlike Clayborn. So even if Clayborn were to somehow beat Jackson out for the starting spot, we'd want to make sure to have a good backup because Clayborn has a long injury history. But starting Jackson in the base defense, where he'll see around 40-50% of the snaps, keeps both him and Clayborn rested: allowing Clayborn to focus on rushing the passer in nickel and nascar.

That brings us to 6 spots. We're at our limit. The only way I can see someone like Mbu making the roster is due to injury to one of those 6 in camp, or Babs is washed up and gets cut, or Jarrett isn't what we hope and gets cut, or Jackson totally bombs in camp and gets cut. If Jackson gets cut, that would mean Clayborn is the only player on the roster that could play 5-tech, and he's not even built correctly for it. With no backup, which would increase Matthews' chances of making it over Mbu, since he is a 5-tech in this scheme. Hageman has the size and strength for it, but I'm not sure if he could handle the more complex 5-tech role yet instead of the 3-tech role.

There is an outside chance that we might keep Matthews around for his special teams services. Obviously this would give us a 7th big DL, and it would likely come at the expense of an ILB position. Seattle usually goes with 5 ILB spots (MLB and WLB types), but they also reserve several of those spots for special teams players. With the terrible situation we have at ILB, I'm not sure we even have 5 guys that should make the team. We'll see on that.

So that's why I think we'll stash our backup 1-tech on the practice squad, and roll with three 3-tech's this year. In 2016 after Babs retires, and Jackson's contract becomes more cuttable if we want to do that, then we'll probably have someone like Mbu on our active roster instead of the practice squad.

Edited by RandomFan
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Role: Competing for Reserve Role at Strong-Side Defensive End

In this new scheme under Dan Quinn, a role for Tyson Jackson doesn't look like something that will be available. He might be able to earn a spot as a rotational strong-side defensive end or a goalline-package player for the 2015 season.

After that, however, it would be shocking to see Jackson on the Falcons. He's just not a great fit for the new scheme and likely won't be able to beat out Adrian Clayborn or Malliciah Goodman for a starting or rotational role without completely changing who he is as a player.

Similar to my thoughts on Jackson. Not sure he makes the cut.

Yeah appears like another wasted big contract. Maybe Q can work some magic with the guy and find a unique talent there. Can't wait to see how this D works realtime.

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Yeah appears like another wasted big contract. Maybe Q can work some magic with the guy and find a unique talent there. Can't wait to see how this D works realtime.

I would also add, we're not Seattle. We don't have their personnel nor do we have their HC or GM nor their scouts, just their former DC of two years. So these player comparison analysis are interesting, but other factors come into play such as talent, age, costs, etc.

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I would also add, we're not Seattle. We don't have their personnel nor do we have their HC or GM nor their scouts, just their former DC of two years. So these player comparison analysis are interesting, but other factors come into play such as talent, age, costs, etc.

I must be missing something. Did someone suggest otherwise?

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Don't get defensive, was just adding my cents. I enjoy your work.

Honestly wasn't getting defensive, I'm genuinely trying to understand where that comment came from. It just seems to me all of what you mentioned is already impied? Or should have been, I guess.

Edited by RandomFan
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