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The Confederate Battle Flag


kicker
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Texas recently rejected its use on license plates, and that decision was affirmed by the Supreme Court.

South Carolina still flies it right outside the Capitol, where a state senator and 8 of his churchgoers were murdered for the color of his skin.

Is there still a valid argument that it isn't a symbol for hate? No serious historians back the premise that slavery wasn't the main issue for the Cvil war. It's an offensive symbol to many. How can the State, in this day and age, support it?

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I literally just posted this in the other thread. Why conservatives should hate the Confederate flag:

http://www.washingto...article/2566609

"As Reihan Salam pointed out at the National Review, back in 2000, Georgia's state government commissioned a study on its own state flag, and it identified that the history of the Confederate battle flag was somewhat complex.

"From the end of the Civil War until the late 1940s, display of the battle flag was mostly limited to Confederate commemorations, Civil War re-enactments, and veterans' parades," the study read. But "In 1948, the battle flag began to take on a different meaning when it appeared at the Dixiecrat convention in Birmingham as a symbol of southern protest and resistance to the federal government — displaying the flag then acquired a more political significance after this convention." Then it became associated with the fight to preserve segregation and racist violence, waved by Alabama Gov. George Wallace and the Ku Klux Klan.

Once again, the flag, the concept of state defiance of the federal government, and a wicked institution were all wrapped together. In breaking down segregation, the federal government claimed vast new powers that it exerted in other areas, and the U.S. Supreme Court augmented Washington's ability to regulate activity through the Commerce Clause.

To this day, any argument modern conservatives try to make about restrictions on federal power inevitably leads back to the question of whether the same principle of federal restraint should have allowed segregation to persist. Conservatives who try to defend the flag (or who are afraid to criticize it) are only reinforcing the perception that supporters of limited government don't really care about the historical or modern day struggles of black Americans.

Even though the flag no longer rests on the top of the South Carolina capitol dome, it still remains on the grounds of the capitol, serving as an ugly reminder of dark legacies in American history that continue to haunt the nation and damage the cause of limited government. It's long past time to tear down this flag."

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For what it's worth, to answer your original post, I don't think some people mean it as a symbol of hate. I also think those people are completely ignorant of why it has gained prominence in the South since the 1940s. And most of them are ignorant of the history surrounding the Civil War. One can honor Confederate figures (Robert E. Lee seems one particularly worthy of honor) without honoring the cause, or that of those who take up the flag in defiance of segregation.

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Texas recently rejected its use on license plates, and that decision was affirmed by the Supreme Court.

South Carolina still flies it right outside the Capitol, where a state senator and 8 of his churchgoers were murdered for the color of his skin.

Is there still a valid argument that it isn't a symbol for hate? No serious historians back the premise that slavery wasn't the main issue for the Cvil war. It's an offensive symbol to many. How can the State, in this day and age, support it?

One sick young man with racist tendencies = "That Confederate Flag Was The Reason". Some people's logic right there. In that case, shouldn't the American flag be a symbol of racism too?

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Didn't sound like he's sick so much as he's racist and came from an environment that encouraged him to embrace fear, violence and xenophobia as the pillars of his worldview. That flag is a symbol of that perspective, and of pretending that violence resulting from bigotry is something other than what it is.

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One sick young man with racist tendencies = "That Confederate Flag Was The Reason". Some people's logic right there. In that case, shouldn't the American flag be a symbol of racism too?

Troll. Nobody said the flag was the reason.
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Ok let's ban every flag that ever supported and encouraged racism or slavery from the U.S. We going to need a new flag too.

nobody said anything about banning the flag. But the State of South Carolina has no business flying it on stategouse grounds, especially given its history over the last 65 years.
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There's also a Jefferson Davis Highway near Augusta. I guess Jon Stewart knows more about South Carolina than SB does.

****, we got a Jeff Davis County. It's just south of Wheeler County, named for Confederate general Joseph Wheeler. Both are complete shitholes, but WheelerCo is the 2nd poorest county in the entire nation according to Wikipedia.

I'm down for renaming all this ****. Quit honoring traitorous losers.

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So in other words Georgia is no better than SC in that regard, maybe worse.

We have the flag thing and a few roads that I've never seen but you all have a giant monument (Stone Mountain), an entire county named after Jefferson Davis, and who knows how many schools and roads.

That said, you should probably look at your own state before worrying too much about SC.

Who do you think Lee County, SC is named after? Also Bamberg County...

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Once you get out of metro Atlanta Georgia isn't much better than any other state in the union. I've got family that went to the aforementioned Jeff Davis High. Supposedly they still have segregated proms though how they legally get away with it I have no idea. (I freaking argued the point)

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So in other words Georgia is no better than SC in that regard, maybe worse.

We have the flag thing and a few roads that I've never seen but you all have a giant monument (Stone Mountain), an entire county named after Jefferson Davis, and who knows how many schools and roads.

That said, you should probably look at your own state before worrying too much about SC.

You said that Jon Stewart was "ignorant" because you had never seen a street named after a confederate general. We showed several of them.

Now it's all about Georgia vs. SC? It's simple, Jon Stewart knows more about SC than you do, apparently. You were wrong. As usual.

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