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Defense Depth Chart Projection: Base And Nickel


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I made this in response to a thread on another site, figured I'd slap it up here too.

Base-1st/2nd down

SDE/Otto: Jackson, Clayborn, Matthews(if he somehow makes the team)
1-tech DT: Soliai, Jackson
3-tech DT: Hageman, Babs, Jarrett

WDE/Leo: Beasley, Biermann, Goodman
SLB: Reed, Schofield, Biermann

MLB: Worrilow, Akunne or Bartu, Stupar
WLB: Durant, Spruill

LCB: Trufant, P. Adams, Southward,
RCB: Alford, J. Collins

FS: R. Allen, Godfrey
SS: Moore, Ishmael

Nickel/Nascar

SDE: Reed, Schofield, Biermann

1-tech/3-tech DT: Clayborn, Jarrett

3-tech DT: Babineaux, Hageman

WDE/Leo: Beasley, Goodman, Schofield

LB: Worrilow, Spruill, Stupar

LB: Durant, Spruill, Akunne or Bartu

LCB: Trufant, P. Adams
RCB: J. Collins, Southward
NickelCB: Alford, P. Adams

FS: R. Allen, Godfrey
SS: Moore, Ishmael

Seattle usually keeps 5-6 big bodied DL types. Our top 6 would be Soliai, Jackson, Hageman, Babineaux, Clayborn, and Jarrett. Goodman has moved to an Edge rusher spot after being told to drop down to 265. He’ll be battling for base LEO and nickel DE snaps. Matthews is probably an odd man out this year unless Jackson flops in camp.

Jackson’s contract makes him unlikely to be cut unless he’s absolutely useless. But if he’s in shape (and he’s been told to be around 305 after playing at 322 last year) then he’s not useless because he fits the base D 5-tech very well. It is a position that will see frequent double teams, and is more of a run D position than a pass rusher. If we are to get any return on our investment, then the base 5T is the best role he’s suited for in this scheme. And it allows Clayborn to stay fresh for pass rush situations in medium to long distances. Expect Jackson to play about 40-45% of snaps, just like Red Bryant used to; and Clayborn around 55% of snaps like M. Bennett in 2013 when Bryant was still on that team and they rotated.

Soliai should see about 50% of snaps. If Hageman starts at 3T, and I think he will, expect him to play about 50% of the snaps too, much like Tony McDaniel in the same role for Seattle. He will play some in sub packages, but for the most part he and Soliai will be pulled in nickel for 2 reasons: 1) to keep them both fresh, and 2) to get better and fresher pass rushers on the field in Babineaux, Clayborn, and Jarrett in those 2 spots. In 2013 in Seattle, when they had good depth like we do this year, nobody on the DL played more than M. Bennett’s 58% of snaps – and Bennett didn’t even start. Expect to see similar numbers for us; especially since Quinn will be evaluating who he wants to keep around past 2015.

This leaves Soliai with no true backup 1-tech/NT with us carrying so many 3-tech’s and 5T’s. Jackson and Hageman could serve as emergency backups to finish out a game. But we’d need to have a real NT on the practice squad that could be called up if Soliai is going to miss more than one game – such as Heimuli or Mbu.

Keep in mind that the 4-3 Under is the primary base, but Seattle also played a good mix of 4-3 Over and 3-4 Bear fronts. That makes Jackson more valuable for his fits and versatility in those fronts, especially the 3-4 Bear look. It also makes Clayborn more valuable since he will probably play the LEO position in some of the 4-3 Over looks versus certain offenses; they usually played Bennett there since that was their answer to facing mobile QB’s.

In Seattle in 2013, the SLB, LEO, and nickel edge rusher snaps were split mainly between 4 players. They each played between approximately 45-55% of the snaps. So a pretty even split between 4 players. We will likely carry 5 of those types of players: Beasley, Reed, Schofield, Biermann, and Goodman. It’s anyone’s guess if we split those snaps between 3, 4, or all 5 at this point. But Schofield should see the field plenty. Reed will too obviously as the starting SLB, and he might rarely leave the field if he’s also a nickel coverage LBer in place of Worrilow or an injured Durant. Beasley should start, but is a rookie so we don’t know what we’ll get from him yet. Biermann shouldn’t be a starter; but as a versatile backup that plays great on special teams, he provides very good value. Goodman and Matthews just might be in a battle for one roster spot. Giving the edge to Goodman due to their positions.

In Seattle the WLB and MLB almost never left the field for them. This won’t be a problem for Durant, barring injury. But it remains to be seen if Worrilow will be able to do that. Obviously he struggled in pass D last year. However, he spent the 2013 offseason bulking up which made him play stiff and unathletically. This offseason he has dropped weight and worked on his flexibiltiy, agility, and speed. We’ll see if it helps him be a true 3-down linebacker instead of the 2-down linebacker he should have been last year. If they elect not to use Reed as a coverage LBer, then Spruill would likely be the nickel LB in Worrilow's place, since he is probably the only other LB we have with the speed required. Akunne is a possibility, but he’s an UDFA that needs a lot of polish that may not even make the roster. Bartu isn’t really a nickel option who is on the bubble too, and Stupar is just a special teamer. An out of the box thought would be using Ishmael as a nickel LB if he isn’t starting elsewhere. Seattle has done something similar in the past in using one of their huge 225+lbs CBs as a nickel LB at times. Ishmael is physical enough to handle it. Durant needs to stay healthy since our ILB depth is weak. We could add a free agent here after other teams start cutting players.

I still contend that Alford will be moved to FS before the regular season starts. (Revising this due to Collins and Southward both being so far behind due to injuries, as of right after Mini-Camp has concluded; combined with the emergence of Ricardo Allen at the FS spot so far. Alford to FS is still possible IMO, but not as likely to happen as I thought before, due to both of the reasons I just mentioned.) The FS in this scheme really needs to have great speed, tackling ability, and instincts. It’s basically a hard hitting CB position with solid tackling skills. We don’t know about the instintcs yet, but everything else just fits Alford so well. This all hinges on both Collins and Southward proving they can hold down the starting RCB and Nickel back jobs in some combination between them – and I think they will. With Adams providing depth at both spots and King learning behind all of them. If Alford shows out and proves too valuable at RCB, then he will start there and move to NCB with Collins or Southward playing the RCB spot in nickel situations. This would likely leave Godfrey as the starting FS, and Ishmael the top backup at both FS and SS. P. Adams can play some backup FS if need be, which enhances his chances of making the roster; especially considering he’s a vet in this system and the rest of our CB’s are so young. It’s still possible that Collins or Southward move back to FS in camp. Lots of options in the secondary, so we’ll just have to see how it all shakes out.

I don’t see R. Allen making this team. (With his solid play so far in OTAs and Mini-Camp, this was likely incorrect. We still have to go through training camp and see if he can keep it up once the pads come on; but so far he seems to be doing well with the move to FS and would appear to at least have a backup job in his future.) He’s not long or fast enough for an outside CB here and since he can’t play outside, we have equal or better options for a nickel back that can. I think he’s an example of something we’ll see several times this training camp – a returning player without a real home in this scheme that they are trying to see if they fit somewhere/anywhere. Quinn likely already concluded he’s not going to be a CB for us, but he’s already on the roster so where "might" we be able to find a home for him? I think it’s less likely they see him as a good fit at FS, but more likely that FS is the "only" potential way he’ll make the team, even as limited as he is for that position too. Quinn puts players in their best position to succeed, and this is it for Allen. But I still don’t think he makes it. Solid player, but just not a good fit for what this scheme requires at any DB position.

Other notable players and why they will not make the team.

Cliff Matthews – Jackson eating himself off the roster is the only way I see Matthews making it this year. Or an injury to Jackson or Clayborn in camp.

Ricky Havili-Heimuli or Joey Mbu – one should go to practice squad. My roster as constructed has no room for a true backup NT. Jackson and Hageman would be the emergency backups to finish a game. We need one of these guys on the practice squad to call up in case.

Stansley Maponga – he’s going to have to beat out Goodman or Biermann. Both Maponga and Goodman lack coverage skills, so it will come down to which is the better pure pass rusher – and I think it’s Goodman. Biermann’s versatility and special teams gets him on the roster.

Tyler Starr – same thing as above. Behind Goodman and Biermann.

Bradford Allen – Fighting with Akunne, Bartu, Stupar, and Spruill for 3 spots. Spruill fits and plays STs. Stupar is all about STs. So it’s really between Allen, Bartu, and Akunne for 1 spot unless one pushes Stupar off the roster.

And as always, my Roster Spreadsheet link is in my signature.

Edited by RandomFan
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Alford is not even in the mix for FS and yes Goodman is interchangeable, but he would be better served playing on the strong side (LE).

Alford is not in the mix at FS YET, which is why I said, "I still contend that Alford will be moved to FS before the regular season starts." You can feel free to disagree. But like I said it's something I think has a strong possibility of happening, and I gave some alternatives if that doesn't happen.

And Goodman, it depends on what you are talking about. In the base D, then he most definitely would be better served as the LEO since he's going to be drastically undersized for the 5-tech SDE role after losing so much weight. In fact, he could end up being the best option we have in the base D at LEO because he should be the best available edge setter we have versus the run. It all depends on if he can give us enough of a pass rush; and if Beasley is ready to be the full time starter or not. But in nickel defense it doesn't really matter which side Goodman lines up on since both DE's are playing traditional 7-tech or Wide-9 pure pass rusher roles.

Edited by RandomFan
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Stupar is a lock. He's arguably our best STer with Weems

That's why he's on my roster. But I'd never call a guy who only plays special teams a lock. Therefore, while it's an unlikely scenario, someone could in fact push him off the roster in training camp.

Edited by RandomFan
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Alford is not in the mix at FS YET, which is why I said, "I still contend that Alford will be moved to FS before the regular season starts." You can feel free to disagree. But like I said it's something I think has a strong possibility of happening, and I gave some alternatives if that doesn't happen.

And Goodman, it depends on what you are talking about. In the base D, then he most definitely would be better served as the LEO since he's going to be drastically undersized for the 5-tech SDE role after losing so much weight. In fact, he could end up being the best option we have in the base D at LEO because he should be the best available edge setter we have versus the run. It all depends on if he can give us enough of a pass rush; and if Beasley is ready to be the full time starter or not. But in nickel defense it doesn't really matter which side Goodman lines up on since both DE's are playing traditional 7-tech or Wide-9 pure pass rusher roles.

Yeah too many if's,and's, & but's for me.

Although Goodman is losing weight, he would be the same size as Michael Bennett who also plays on the strong side. Don't forget Clayborn has played RE for the first 3 years of his career. It wasn't until last year when they acquired Michael Johnson that Lovie Smith decided to move him to LE. Clayborn is interchangeable as is Goodman, but like I said Goodman is better suited as a LE. Clayborn sack total from the RE position is 7.5 (2011) and 5.5 (2013). Was hurt in the 3rd game his sophomore season (2012)

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I love how you slotted the d-line, with the SDE, 1-tech and 3-tech separated as kind of the "o-line" guys and the LEO and SAM slotted as the "OLB" type guys. It is a more accurate way to look at our defense, and highlights how we are a 4-3 team running 3-4 principles.

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You are very optimistic about Spruill. I hope it works out. I cannot say I have ever seen him play.

I think it's less about optimism regarding Spruill, and more about realizing our depth at ILB is very weak, at best. Training camp could prove otherwise, but for now...

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Yeah too many if's,and's, & but's for me.

Although Goodman is losing weight, he would be the same size as Michael Bennett who also plays on the strong side. Don't forget Clayborn has played RE for the first 3 years of his career. It wasn't until last year when they acquired Michael Johnson that Lovie Smith decided to move him to LE. Clayborn is interchangeable as is Goodman, but like I said Goodman is better suited as a LE. Clayborn sack total from the RE position is 7.5 (2011) and 5.5 (2013). Was hurt in the 3rd game his sophomore season (2012)

Except that Goodman @ 265 is a good 15+ pounds lighter than Bennett, who looks at least 280. So not the same size. And unlike in Tampa, the DE's in this base scheme are not interchangeable at all - they are completely different positions with completely different body types. Cliff Avril at 265 is the biggest LEO the Seahawks have used in the base D; and Bennett at his 280ish is the lightest 5-tech they have ever used.

Edited by RandomFan
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Let's see who's more correct after a few games in to the season. I'm not going to argue semantics with you anymore. Just give my take on the depth chart and we'll see who ends up closer to correct when it's over.

Base-1st/2nd down

SDE/Otto: Jackson, Clayborn

1-tech DT: Soliai, Jarrett

3-tech DT: Babs, Hageman

WDE/Leo: Beasley, Schofield

SLB: Reed, Biermann

MLB: Worrilow, Stupar

WLB: Durant, Bartu

LCB: Trufant, Adams, Southward

RCB: Alford, Adams, Collins

FS: Godfrey, Allen, King

SS: Moore, Ishmael

Nickel/Nascar

SDE: Clayborn, Biermann, Goodman

1-tech DT: Jarrett, Babs

3-tech DT: Hageman, Babs

WDE: Beasley, Schofield

LB: Worrilow, Bartu

LB: Durant, Spruill

LCB: Trufant, Southward

RCB: Alford, Adams

NickelCB: Adams, Collins

FS: Godfrey, Allen, King

SS: Moore, Ishmael

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No way Collins beats out Alford. Don't need a rookie getting torched all year. Ease him into the defensive scheme. He can learn and switch Alford to FS next yr. Reed is hurt doubt he starts

IMO Collins was taken as high as he was to be an immediate starter. The transition for him may be from nickel to outside but it wouldn't surprise me at all to see him starting with Alford at nickel. Ish or Godfrey will win the gig at FS, hoping Ish does.

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I hope our free safety has that speed and range. I was so sure Southward would emerge as a starter at safety eventually. We definitely will find our long term starter at free safety next year though. I like Godfrey though; he should do an alright job if he ends up starting. Fs seems to be our biggest question mark on defense.

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BIG

LEO-Biermann

RDT-Hageman

LDT-Soliai

LDE-Jackson

SLB-Reed

Fast

LEO-Beasley

RDT-Babinaux

LDT-Jarrett

LDE-Clayborn

SLB-Schofield

For that reason the two deep to me

LEO-Beasley, Biermann

RDT-Hageman, Babinaux

LDT-Soliai, Jarrett

LDE-Clayborn, Jackson

SLB-Reed, Schofield

Two deep is 10 DL. They will keep 4 maybe 5 LB's, and 10 DB's IMO. If they go balanced 25 on offense, 25 on D, there is one spot to give which Goodman, Matthews, Maponga, Akkune or Spruill, Stupar or Bartu, Starr, and Mbu all could be fighting for. If one shines on teams it makes it easier to decide. They could keep two if they go 24 on offense and 26 on D.

WLB-Durant, Spruill or Akunne

MLB-Worrilow, Stupar or Bartu

Two deep at these two positions, The two losers could battle Starr for a 5th LB spot or be PS candidates.

RCB-Alford, Collins, Southward, King, Phillips, Mincy, Parms, Therezie, Floyd

NB-

LCB-Trufant, White

FS-Godfrey

SS-Moore, Ishmael

SS is two deep and seems set. Trufant is set as one CB. Alford could be tried at NB but Collins and Southward have to get on the practice field to man the RCB for that to happen. Rookie King could be tried inside and out like the rest.Two need to prove able to play inside. Whoever cant play inside or out has last chance at FS. I believe White can play LCB providing two deep at LCB. RCB, NB, and FS have 10 guys competing for two deep at those three spots.

Edited by Ryan_2.0_WCO
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No way Collins beats out Alford. Don't need a rookie getting torched all year. Ease him into the defensive scheme. He can learn and switch Alford to FS next yr. Reed is hurt doubt he starts

Dont worry about that. They already said the number one rule Quinn taught them was dont get beat deep.

Edited by Ryan_2.0_WCO
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I'm going to elaborate on why I think Collins has a good shot at winning the RCB job, even though Alford has 2 years of experience on him. This is going to be a long post, with a lot of quoted material. But the main gist is going to be that because the way Seattle has traditionally trained their CBs to play is so different from what Alford is used to, or any other teams CBs for that matter. Trufant should be fine because he's simply a phenomenal player. But even he is going to take some time to adjust to this style of play. Back to the main point, because the system and style is so different, Alford isn't nearly as far ahead of a rookie as a 2 year veteran usually would be regarding experience.

Let me explain further with some copy + pasting. This is two different author's takes on the same Pete Carroll comments about how they develop their CB's.

http://www.sbnation.com/nfl/2014/1/29/5355360/super-bowl-xlviii-seahawks-defense-richard-sherman-earl-thomas-covering-peyton-manning

So, how have Carroll and his staff been able to develop such a talented and deep group of cornerbacks in a league where corner is one of the mostly highly valued positions?

It comes down to scouting/acquisition, and player development. Said Pete Carroll:

There's a couple aspects to [how we've managed to build a group of talented corners]. One, we want fast guys, and long guys, that's what we're looking for.

This is obvious. Fast and long. Pete Carroll's "angular" and big cornerbacks. Carroll continues...

Then, they've been indoctrinated into the system.

Indoctrinated. Indoctrinated is really kind of a strong word. He didn't say they're "taught the system," or that "they're brought into the system." Indoctrinated.

This is what it really comes down to, in my opinion. Every single corner in the draft is fast. You narrow the group to some of the taller players, but from there, you have to develop those players and mold them into exactly what you want them to be. You have to hone their skills, craft their styles to fit your scheme, and work on it every day.

Says Carroll:

Kris Richard and Rocky Seto [defensive backs coach & defensive passing game coordinator] have done a fantastic job of training them. They're really, really, strict, and if you guys could appreciate it, they (the corners) all look the same, somewhat.

The way they step, the way they challenge at the line of scrimmage, the way they finish in the things that we teach.

This is a long, long process, to get these guys to where they are. But, now they're in the system, and it doesn't matter who steps in and plays. It's impressive. So, it's a process, but it's kind of a systems thing for us.

This is something that's resonated with me. Despite what you'd think about NFL-level coaching, there are varying degrees of emphasis put on player development and teaching. It always stands out to me how hands-on all of Seattle's positional coaches are with their players, how specific they are, and how repetitive they are.

At the end of the day, Seattle's cornerback depth is strong because they've been able to mesh good coaching with a specific and well-developed scheme. Obviously, Carroll and John Schneider have done a great job of finding talent. But Carroll's focus on the little things — indoctrinating his players into the system he's been running for decades — plays a big part of it.

Repetition, muscle memory, the confidence factor ... these all play a part in the reason this front office has been able to turn mid- to late-round picks and CFL cast-offs into All-Pro players.

http://www.fieldgulls.com/football-breakdowns/2015/5/29/8688055/pete-carrolls-seahawks-richard-sherman-cary-williams

One of the more interesting tidbits to come out of the first week of Seahawks' OTAs was a quote by Cary Williams, as he talked about adjusting to the Seahawks' style of secondary play.

"They talk about being more patient," Williams said, per the Seahawks' website. "There's a lot of intricate things that are different than other places. They're more focused on the details, like I said, and it's an emphasis on those things and making sure you're focused on those small details on every snap."

There are few, if any, teams that can replicate what Seattle has done and their ability to seemingly plug and play different guys over the years has been truly remarkable. I've thought for some time that much of this had to do with Pete Carroll and his staff's ability to teach their techniques and develop their players so they could succeed in their system. Find guys that fit from a physical and mental point of view (long, fast, aggressive, confident), then teach them closely in executing what they need to do to succeed.

Do they teach the exact footwork? Do they teach precise hand-placement? Do they ask their players to meticulously nail down the exact, explicit fundamental techniques needed to run their particular system? I think so. More than other teams? Sounds like it, based on Williams' description. And, Williams has been with three other teams previously.

"Then," added Carroll, "they've been indoctrinated into the system."

Indoctrinated. Carroll is a guy that chooses his words carefully. Indoctrinated typically has a negative connotation, but in this context, it makes complete sense. It's why Seattle's corners all "look the same" somewhat.

"The way they step, the way they challenge at the line of scrimmage, the way they finish in the things that we teach," said Carroll. "This is a long, long process, to get these guys to where they are. But, now they're in the system, and it doesn't matter who steps in and plays. It's impressive. "So, it's a process, but it's kind of a systems thing for us." A systems thing. It's a process. A long, long process. It doesn't matter who steps in and plays.

Jayson Jenks of the Seattle Times wrote about the Seahawks' step-kick technique of press coverage the other day, something that I hadn't heard about specifically in the past. It's fascinating, and illustrates what Cary Williams was talking about.

The Seahawks teach a press coverage technique called the step-kick, which is pretty much just like it sounds. At the snap of the ball, while a receiver shimmies at the line, the Seahawks want their corners to step with one foot and wait until the receiver starts moving up the field. A corner pretty much has to stand there, like a defender in basketball watching a guy crossover and fake but not going anywhere.


What that requires more than anything is patience, and it is something that most of Seattle's cornerbacks have struggled with in the past, from Tharold Simon to Byron Maxwell to DeShawn Shead. It will take Smith time to get comfortable trusting the technique himself, and on day one he looked raw. But that isn't unusual or unexpected, and the Seahawks have a good track record of teaching corners that skill.

_________________________________________________________________________

OK, that should give you a little bit of an idea how different it is to play CB in this scheme than it is in other schemes. And this should also make you realize that while Alford does have NFL experiences that do actually give him benefits over rookies, because the system and style is changing so much, those benefits are greatly reduced. They are all starting at almost ground zero in learning these techniques; and it might even be worse for the vets in certain aspects if they have to unlearn habits in order to retrain the habits the new coaches want to instill.

Finally, I'm going to conclude with a scouting report of J. Collins before he was drafted from a website called Seahawks Draft Blog, who was obviously doing a report on draftable players that fit the Seahawks mold.

http://seahawksdraftblog.com/on-further-review-lsus-jalen-collins-is-a-special-talent

Every now and again you come across a player who just jumps off the screen. Jalen Collins is one of those players.

Is he the finished article? Absolutely not. Does he possess tremendous upside and potential plus every single athletic and physical trait you want in a #1 corner? Oh yes. The idea of this coaching staff getting the opportunity to work with Collins is tantalizing. If it’s going to take a special cornerback for Seattle to consider spending a first round pick, consider me convinced. Collins is the real deal.

When you watch the video above, don’t be disappointed when you see Notre Dame complete a couple of slants against Collins. Consider this instead. That’s two games against supposed high power offenses. How many big plays does he give up? How much yardage does he concede in those games? Then head over to Draft Breakdown and watch his performance against Alabama and Wisconsin. Play after play he’s right there — ultra tight coverage.

Physically he has the works — height (6-2), size (198lbs), long arms and general length. He has soft feet and great hips to drive on the ball and change direction with fluidity and snap. Recovery speed is vital for any corner and he has it — when he loses track on a route he’ll react and regain position. He has the leaping ability and arm length to play the ball in the air and the instinct working in zone to read the play and break on the defender. We’re talking about a naturally gifted corner with very few flaws.

The problem is — he only has ten starts. Ideally he stays in school for another year and builds on what we see above — but he received a very favorable grade from the draft committee (no surprise). Sometimes you can see the lack of experience show up on tape — there are technique issues working in press and he can be a bit more patient at times. Nobody should be concerned about that. The Seahawks have the best secondary coaches in the league led by the ultimate #1 defensive backs coach in Pete Carroll.

Collins is everything you look for in a corner — the height, the speed. He’s not a crazy run defender but he’s willing to get involved. Because of the emergence of the Legion of Boom and the lack of great depth at the position, it won’t be a total shock if Collins goes much earlier than people expect. If he’s there at #31 — I sincerely hope the Seahawks consider pulling the trigger presuming Byron Maxwell walks. Yes — the offense needs help. But the identity of the team is really down to Russell Wilson, Marshawn Lynch and the LOB. Pay the first two, replace Maxwell and that is maintained. Collins’ arrival would secure all four secondary spots for the next four years, delivering consistency to a key group.

He’s not the only player with exciting physical talent. But none of the receivers or offensive linemen appear to rival Collins for upside, potential, scheme fit, physical ideals and pure talent.

It’ll be fascinating to see how fast he runs at the combine. Richard Sherman ran a 4.56. I almost hope Collins manages a similar effort to keep his stock under control. I suspect he’ll break the 4.4’s. Any team looking for a prospect with comparable physical traits to Sherman will look at Collins. He’ll need some work but any self-respecting coach would back themselves to deliver with these tools at hand. Collins could be special.

If we are going to have to go through an extended learning curve whether Alford starts at CB or not, then I'm inclined to go ahead and let us take our lumps with Collins if Quinn really believes this kid can be special. Same thing with Southward if the feeling is similar there. That isn't a knock against Alford and his CB abilities; it's just that I think we have a crater sized hole at FS, which happens to be a lynchpin position for the success of this defense, and he is the only player on the roster that I think has the skillset to possibly provide everything we need in a FS - while also not being an ideal fit height and length wise for what this scheme wants in a CB.

Edited by RandomFan
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Collins does not figure to have success inside based on trouble vs Amari Cooper. I hate to say it but the best CB we have working inside, working through natural picks, and sticking with shifty WR's across the middle is Trufant. The one thing Southward did well as a college safety was carry his man deep and play the ball. I think Southward will handle RCB but I think Trufant could start there until 3 WR sets if Collins can play LCB immediately.

RCB-Trufant, Southward, King

FS-Godfrey, _______?

SS-Moore, Ishmael

LCB-Collins, Alford, White

RCB-Southward, King

NCB-Trufant, Alford

FS-Godfrey, _______?

SS-Moore, Ishmael

LCB-Collins, White

Can't wait for everyone to come back healthy and competition to start paring down top 10 DB's.

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BIG

LEO-Biermann

RDT-Hageman

LDT-Soliai

LDE-Jackson

SLB-Reed

Fast

LEO-Beasley

RDT-Babinaux

LDT-Jarrett

LDE-Clayborn

SLB-Schofield

Two deep is 10 DL. They will keep 4 maybe 5 LB's, and 10 DB's IMO.

Also, Trufant is our LCB. Collins, Alford, and Southward are battling for RCB.

Quinn said before OTA's that they are going into camp starting off with Babs and Clayborn as the two inside DT's in nickel packages. While that could change during camp, this would tend to follow what Quinn did last year with Bennett moving inside to DT on passing downs - Clayborn would be like Bennett in that scenario. That is also when they often moved Irvin from his SLB position to a pass rushing DE position.

I sincerely hope Biermann isn't forced to start at LEO in the base D. Hopefully Beasley will win the job in camp; and if not, then perhaps Goodman will grab it. I'd rather only see Biermann on special teams and as an occassional rotational edge rusher. But you might be right about Biermann, unfortunately...

Regarding the roster breakdown, look more for this type of scenario:

6 Big Bodied D Lineman (that can play End/5T, Nose/1T, and Tackle/3T)

5 LEO + SLB + Edge rushers

5 Off-ball LB's (MLB and WLB types)

5 CBs

4 Safeties.

Edited by RandomFan
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RandomFan I've been saying I wanted Alford at FS for the longest or at least since the hiring of Quinn. Although Alford and Quinn has been on record about Alford playing corner, I think Alford training with Ryan Clark this offseason has him preparing for FS. If Ricardo Allen is getting a shot at FS why not do the same for Alford.

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If Ricardo Allen is getting a shot at FS why not do the same for Alford.

I completely agree, which is why it makes sense. But I think there are several factors that are keeping that from happening so far. Alford is a returning starter at CB, so I'm sure he wants to take a shot at the CB position before being moved somewhere else. I mean, who wouldn't want to stay at their position? Especially a position that pays better than the safety position when talking about contracts.

Quinn is in no rush to force a move that would make the player unhappy or ruffle feathers; especially not when it may turn out that Alford actually could turn out to be a beast at the CB position - combined with the uncertainty regarding Collins and Southward due to youth and injuries so far.

That's why I said I think during training camp this will happen. Once he gets Collins and Southward out on the field and finds out what they can do, I think they will show well enough that it will be more appealing of an option to try Alford out at FS for a few days to see what he can do there. And I think he'll take to FS very well.

But there really is no reason to rush it at this point, and is smarter not to make the move yet until Quinn has verification that Collins and/or Southward are all that we hope for at the CB spot. You don't want to move Alford to FS and then have to move him back to CB later on if Collins and Southward aren't ready to assume those jobs.

Edited by RandomFan
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Soliai I doubt will get that many snaps based on history

Based on what history? Could you elaborate?

It can't be Seattle's history based on their usage of the 1-tech over the last 3 years:

2014 = Mebane went on IR in week 10, but was on pace for around 50% of snaps.

2013 = 50.9% for Mebane

2012 = 62.2% for Mebane

And it can't be for Soliai based on his usage over the last 3 years:

2014 = 46.4%

2013 = 45.7%

2012 = 55.3%

Ballparking it around 50% for Soliai in 2015 seems perfectly reasonable based both on past Seattle scheme snap counts and his personal player snap counts.

Unless you have some other history to provide?

Edited by RandomFan
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Based on what history? Could you elaborate?

It can't be Seattle's history based on their usage of the 1-tech over the last 3 years:

2014 = Mebane who went on IR during the season and Williams combined for 73.1% of defensive snaps played at 1T.

2013 = 50.9% for Mebane

2012 = 62.2% for Mebane

And it can't be for Soliai based on his usage over the last 3 years:

2014 = 46.4%

2013 = 45.7%

2012 = 55.3%

Ballparking it around 50% for Soliai in 2015 seems perfectly reasonable based both on past Seattle scheme snap counts and his personal player snap counts.

Unless you have some other history to provide?

2014 = 46.4%

2013 = 45.7%

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2014 = 46.4%

2013 = 45.7%

Are you seriously trying to say that 46.4% and 45.7% dont fall within the range of "about 50%" like I'd originally said? blink.png

Especially considering those were accumulated in a different scheme; while his new scheme is one in which the NT never averaged less than 50% the last 3 years.

Edited by RandomFan
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