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Blank Says Pats’ “Failure To Acknowledge” Caused Hammer To Fall


JOEinPHX
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It's worth noting once again that AB's handling of Noisegate was masterful.

http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2015/05/15/blank-says-pats-failure-to-acknowledge-caused-hammer-to-fall/

When the NFL investigated the Falcons for pumping fake crowd noise into the Georgia Dome, they took a novel approach.

They fessed up, got rid of a scapegoat, took their punishment and didn’t write a 20,000-word screed explaining that it was just Jim McNally’s step class mix tape.

And Falcons owner Arthur Blank seemed to suggest that was the difference in penalties between his team ($350,000, a fifth-rounder and three months of team president Rich McKay on the competition committee) and the Patriots ($1,000,000, a first- and fourth-round draft pick and four games worth of quarterback Tom Brady).

“That seems to be the general feeling, that some of the frustration whether on an individual basis or organizational basis, was the failure to acknowledge,” Blank said of the Patriots punishment, via the Associated Press.

Blank said he wasn’t familiar with all the details of the DeflateGate investigation (they keep the 10-foot-poles with which to not touch things on Aisle 37 at Home Depot), but couldn’t help but see the differences in his case and Robert Kraft’s.

“Of course you think about it,” Blank said. “The league feels a tremendous sense of responsibility, as do all the owners, in reinforcing the culture of the NFL, the shield and make sure the game remains as balanced and as pure and as true to its integrity and its ethics as can be done. When they find any organization or any individual has gotten off those tracks it’s their job to remind them of that and bring them back on the tracks and do it in a way that really reinforces what the league is about.

“I think in the case of New England they have done that.”

Blank also said that Kraft remained one of the influential owners in the league, and thinks he’ll be able to weather the storm.

“I think after things are processed, Robert will be in a good place, I think the commissioner will be in a good place, I think their relationship will be a good one and they will continue to work for the benefit of the National Football League for a long time,” Blank said.

Of course, that relationship is going to need some work in the time being, and Blank may have to offer a discount on some spackle and a can of paint to get it patched up.

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Guest King Jigsaw

It's hard for writers to write an article about AB without throwing in some terrible Home Depot puns.

That spackle line was cringe-worthy, at best.

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That spackle line was cringe-worthy, at best.

Blank is a stand up owner glad he owned up to it & The Falcons as an organization took responsibility & canned the person who at least was perceived to have been responsible for pumping in the noise.

The HD references are bush league journalism & it makes me cringe too when a writer tries to be too cute or clever & fails so miserably. That's what happens when bad writers don't have an editor.

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I appreciate Blank's forthrightness in the Noisegate scandal, but the more I look over the Wells Report, the more holes I see in the case. I don't blame the Pats for fighting it tooth and nail.

I think the Pats are blustering. They'll see what sort of concessions they can get through righteous indignation, but a lawsuit, if it came to that, would offer far more risk than reward. In the meantime they've shown that they put self-preservation ahead of league preservation. In the long run that can't possibly serve them well.

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I think the Pats are blustering. They'll see what sort of concessions they can get through righteous indignation, but a lawsuit, if it came to that, would offer far more risk than reward. In the meantime they've shown that they put self-preservation ahead of league preservation. In the long run that can't possibly serve them well.

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Sure it can.

The only true risk of a civil suit would be discovery of Brady texts/communications. But A) people already assume he was engaged in those practices so its not like texts would break new ground and B) he probably already wiped all of them

I don't know that they SHOULD file suit just because I can't really think of a cause of action they could pursue. But if such a suit lead to the NFL backing off or, better yet, a massive challenge to Goodell's power ultimately resulting in his termination? That could be beneficial to everyone involved.

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I think the Pats are blustering. They'll see what sort of concessions they can get through righteous indignation, but a lawsuit, if it came to that, would offer far more risk than reward.

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Yes it would. Tom Brady's cellphone records are discoverable. I wonder if the NFL has sent him a spoliation letter already?

If not, they should.

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I'm not a fan of the "we must do everything in our power to bend to Roger's every whim" line of reasoning. If I'm confident that I did nothing wrong, I would fight it, just as the Patriots are doing.

The Patriots are only fighting it post-punnishment. The primary reason they got punnished in the first place is because they didn't cooperate in the investigation, which is the first sign of being guilty.

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Sure it can.

The only true risk of a civil suit would be discovery of Brady texts/communications. But A) people already assume he was engaged in those practices so its not like texts would break new ground and cool.png he probably already wiped all of them

I don't know that they SHOULD file suit just because I can't really think of a cause of action they could pursue. But if such a suit lead to the NFL backing off or, better yet, a massive challenge to Goodell's power ultimately resulting in his termination? That could be beneficial to everyone involved.

Or they still lose and the NFL gets pissed that the Pats took them to court, further putting them in hot water.

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The Patriots are only fighting it post-punnishment. The primary reason they got punnished in the first place is because they didn't cooperate in the investigation, which is the first sign of being guilty.

"Cooperating" involved turning over Brady's personal cell-phone (why would he do that? I wouldn't trust the NFL with my personal info) and making an employee available for further interrogation (maybe the Patriots felt the employee had said everything that he needed to). I'm not sure how that is necessarily a sign that you are guilty of wrong-doing.

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"Cooperating" involved turning over Brady's personal cell-phone (why would he do that? I wouldn't trust the NFL with my personal info) and making an employee available for further interrogation (maybe the Patriots felt the employee had said everything that he needed to). I'm not sure how that is necessarily a sign that you are guilty of wrong-doing.

Brady didn't have to turn over his phone. They said he can just hand over copies of relevant texts to the investigation through his lawyer, never actually handing over his phone. Him and his lawyer could've even cherry picked the texts if they wanted to

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I think the Pats are blustering. They'll see what sort of concessions they can get through righteous indignation, but a lawsuit, if it came to that, would offer far more risk than reward. In the meantime they've shown that they put self-preservation ahead of league preservation. In the long run that can't possibly serve them well.

.

Sorry, I just don't see any definitive proof of tampering. A lot of innuendo based off texts that had nothing to do with the AFC championship game, and sorry, but while there may be accusations, there is no proof of any deflated balls before that game. Maybe they did, but the problem is, the NFL never took ball tampering seriously enough to create sufficient protocols to prevent it. Namely logging PSIs of balls throughout the game, and a myriad of other processes that allow way too many opportunities for teams to tamper with balls. The Vikings and the Panthers got caught red-handed heating balls a couple years ago, with a minimal fine and no media coverage.

If this wasn't the Pats, this would have had less media coverage and criticism than our noisegate scandal did, and I also believe that the punishment would have been negligible. Not only were the Pats not given the courtesy of being warned like the Saints were, they were practically set up by the GM of a rival team, and even then there is no definitive proof, because of a lack of documentation, inaccurate gauges, and incomplete comparison. (they only measured 4 Colts balls).

If the best argument the NFL can make is "probably", I'd fight them to the end. I don't blame them one bit.

i don't know if they cheated, but I can say that this process was biased since a Colts beat writer leaked it an hour after the Pats stomped the Colts.

The Steelers have been caught stealing calls, Mike Tomlin actually tripped a player during a return, and yet they skated by any national outrage, The Pats are hated, when even Spygate seems tame compared to things like what the Saints, Steelers, Charges, and even our Falcons have done with noisegate.

I think this investigation and punishment have been far too tainted by public perception. I think the draft picks and Brady Suspenion are overkill. I also hope this is the beginning of the end of the Goodell reign.

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But there already appears to be a certain angle of the NFL "gunnin'" for the Patriots. I mean, what else could they do?

I don't see it. They cheated in the second biggest game of the season and got punished for it, not like there has to be some vendetta against the Pats for that to happen.

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Why do people continue to focus on only one game? Ravens players accused them of this too. Yes, they blew the Colts out. No it wouldn't have mattered,but what about every game before that one?

I have no doubt that the Pats were deflating balls prior to the Colts game. How else does a guy get the "Deflator" moniker? I just can't make the leap to Brady being guilty, at least not until there is more substantial evidence

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"Cooperating" involved turning over Brady's personal cell-phone (why would he do that? I wouldn't trust the NFL with my personal info) and making an employee available for further interrogation (maybe the Patriots felt the employee had said everything that he needed to). I'm not sure how that is necessarily a sign that you are guilty of wrong-doing.

If I'm innocent I would do anything and everything to help expedite the process and solidify the fact I had no involvement. Why are people so weird about stuff like that? It really shouldn't be an issue if you know you did nothing wrong.
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