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America’S Changing Religious Landscape


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"The Christian share of the U.S. population is declining, while the number of U.S. adults who do not identify with any organized religion is growing, according to an extensive new survey by the Pew Research Center. Moreover, these changes are taking place across the religious landscape, affecting all regions of the country and many demographic groups. While the drop in Christian affiliation is particularly pronounced among young adults, it is occurring among Americans of all ages. The same trends are seen among whites, blacks and Latinos; among both college graduates and adults with only a high school education; and among women as well as men.

To be sure, the United States remains home to more Christians than any other country in the world, and a large majority of Americans – roughly seven-in-ten – continue to identify with some branch of the Christian faith.1 But the major new survey of more than 35,000 Americans by the Pew Research Center finds that the percentage of adults (ages 18 and older) who describe themselves as Christians has dropped by nearly eight percentage points in just seven years, from 78.4% in an equally massive Pew Research survey in 2007 to 70.6% in 2014. Over the same period, the percentage of Americans who are religiously unaffiliated – describing themselves as atheist, agnostic or “nothing in particular” – has jumped more than six points, from 16.1% to 22.8%. And the share of Americans who identify with non-Christian faiths also has inched up, rising 1.2 percentage points, from 4.7% in 2007 to 5.9% in 2014. Growth has been especially great among Muslims and Hindus, albeit from a very low base.

The drop in the Christian share of the population has been driven mainly by declines among mainline Protestants and Catholics. Each of those large religious traditions has shrunk by approximately three percentage points since 2007. The evangelical Protestant share of the U.S. population also has dipped, but at a slower rate, falling by about one percentage point since 2007..."

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http://www.pewforum.org/2015/05/12/americas-changing-religious-landscape/

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We did't need a survey to know this was going to happen. Jesus predicted it.

I think American Christianity has had a pretty bad problem with hypocrisy for a while now. Between using Christianity as a cover to schill for Republican politicians (and there is nothing wrong with

We're also so obsessed with externalities these days, so the idea of deep introspective thinking that comes with religious belief is not prevalent.

Not surprising. We spend 24/7 in this country lying about evolution,discouraging religion,and calling people ignorant for believing in God.

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By their fruits you shall know them

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GENEVA -- The Vatican revealed Tuesday that over the past decade, it has defrocked 848 priests who raped or molested children and sanctioned another 2,572 with lesser penalties, providing the first ever breakdown of how it handled the more than 3,400 cases of abuse reported to the Holy See since 2004.

These fruits?

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BigBobTilton.jpg

fKERHTvG.jpeg

hqdefault.jpg

swaggart.jpg?w=627

GENEVA -- The Vatican revealed Tuesday that over the past decade, it has defrocked 848 priests who raped or molested children and sanctioned another 2,572 with lesser penalties, providing the first ever breakdown of how it handled the more than 3,400 cases of abuse reported to the Holy See since 2004.

These fruits?

Rotten fruit indeed

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BigBobTilton.jpg

fKERHTvG.jpeg

hqdefault.jpg

swaggart.jpg?w=627

GENEVA -- The Vatican revealed Tuesday that over the past decade, it has defrocked 848 priests who raped or molested children and sanctioned another 2,572 with lesser penalties, providing the first ever breakdown of how it handled the more than 3,400 cases of abuse reported to the Holy See since 2004.

These fruits?

False teachers that Jesus spoke about. See their fruit, see their lives, see their doctrine. Wolves in sheep's clothing.
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Rotten fruit indeed

Don't get me wrong, I don't post all that to say people shouldn't believe in god or whatever they want to believe in. In the end, something has to have always been here whether that's a god, energy, etc or there's another alternative that we just don't have the ability to comprehend or know about yet. I just couldn't resist the entertainment factor of responding, I admit it...

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I think American Christianity has had a pretty bad problem with hypocrisy for a while now. Between using Christianity as a cover to schill for Republican politicians (and there is nothing wrong with a Christian being a Republican -- it's the politicization of the faith that is the issue) and being generally selective in how we view the sins of others, it's a pretty tough sell.

Add to that the fact that Christianity in this country is more big business than religion, and you have a recipe for disaster. Christians in America buy books, watch TV, make (generally horrible, "Passion of the Christ" being a notable exception) movies, etc. But they don't fast, pray, give alms, care for the poor, etc. That's not to say none do these things, but in general, we have a whole lot of "Sunday-only" Christians who feel free to lie, cheat, steal, be adulterers, abuse substances, practice gluttony, etc. M-S, but then show up to Church on Sunday acting as if the real problem is all those sinners out there in the world.

The Church is a hospital for sinners. We treat it like weekly entertainment and a social club. That is a very real problem that isn't going away anytime soon.

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I also think that open access to such a broad array of ideologies may explain some of it.

It used to be the case that you were exposed to what your parents taught, what you learned at school, and what you happened to read and learn from your friends. It wasn't likely that you would be exposed to anything other than what your immediate environment provided, so people tended to carry on the ideology they were taught and born into.

Now, people are exposed to every kind of ideology, and every argument for and against every religion. People in the US are aware of Buddhism, Islam, atheism, etc. in ways that they have never been. I think that the understanding that there are so many different religious ideologies may make people aware that maybe their story isn't the only story, and that there are myriad ways to approach faith...including not having faith.

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I also think that open access to such a broad array of ideologies may explain some of it.

It used to be the case that you were exposed to what your parents taught, what you learned at school, and what you happened to read and learn from your friends. It wasn't likely that you would be exposed to anything other than what your immediate environment provided, so people tended to carry on the ideology they were taught and born into.

Now, people are exposed to every kind of ideology, and every argument for and against every religion. People in the US are aware of Buddhism, Islam, atheism, etc. in ways that they have never been. I think that the understanding that there are so many different religious ideologies may make people aware that maybe their story isn't the only story, and that there are myriad ways to approach faith...including not having faith.

Certainly, though the myriad of options also allows one to enter an echo chamber where their own views are parroted back to them instead of actually engaging opposing arguments.

Usually, when someone starts a discussion by suggesting that "anyone who believes ________ is stupid/lacking in reason/ignorant," etc., I assume I'm dealing with someone who has never had their views challenged. And I see that on both sides of the atheist/theist fence. I certainly don't think Bertrand Russell was an idiot. I don't think Nietzsche was an idiot. There are some who do think that, though. And others on the other side who think people like Martin Luther or Pope John Paul II are idiots. I do think people stepping outside their field and ridiculing others should be judged accordingly, but that's another matter.

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I think American Christianity has had a pretty bad problem with hypocrisy for a while now. Between using Christianity as a cover to schill for Republican politicians (and there is nothing wrong with a Christian being a Republican -- it's the politicization of the faith that is the issue) and being generally selective in how we view the sins of others, it's a pretty tough sell.

Add to that the fact that Christianity in this country is more big business than religion, and you have a recipe for disaster. Christians in America buy books, watch TV, make (generally horrible, "Passion of the Christ" being a notable exception) movies, etc. But they don't fast, pray, give alms, care for the poor, etc. That's not to say none do these things, but in general, we have a whole lot of "Sunday-only" Christians who feel free to lie, cheat, steal, be adulterers, abuse substances, practice gluttony, etc. M-S, but then show up to Church on Sunday acting as if the real problem is all those sinners out there in the world.

The Church is a hospital for sinners. We treat it like weekly entertainment and a social club. That is a very real problem that isn't going away anytime soon.

What's sad is most Christians don't realize that the things you just stated are a huge turn off to non-Christians who investigate Christianity. The other problem is all the different denominations and they are so vastly different that it's really hard to pinpoint what Christianity really is. Sure, you can take the Orthodox view that the Council of Nicea made it very clear what it is but to a non-believer all they see is "Wow, these people claim to worship the same god yet can't agree on whether the son of god is actually god in human form or an entirely different entity!" (among other things that are so very different). From Baptists to Orthodox to Jehovah's Witness to Mormons. They are so drastically different that it's hard to believe they all claim to believe in the same god...

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I've learned to appreciate Christianity through philosophy years after having it thrust upon me exclusively as a religion to be believed or not believed the way that Christianity. Unfortunately one thing American Christianity and the present atheist community have in common are the appeal of being on a "team" rather than attempting to expand on one's own perspective past one school of thought.

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I think American Christianity has had a pretty bad problem with hypocrisy for a while now. Between using Christianity as a cover to schill for Republican politicians (and there is nothing wrong with a Christian being a Republican -- it's the politicization of the faith that is the issue) and being generally selective in how we view the sins of others, it's a pretty tough sell.

Add to that the fact that Christianity in this country is more big business than religion, and you have a recipe for disaster. Christians in America buy books, watch TV, make (generally horrible, "Passion of the Christ" being a notable exception) movies, etc. But they don't fast, pray, give alms, care for the poor, etc. That's not to say none do these things, but in general, we have a whole lot of "Sunday-only" Christians who feel free to lie, cheat, steal, be adulterers, abuse substances, practice gluttony, etc. M-S, but then show up to Church on Sunday acting as if the real problem is all those sinners out there in the world.

The Church is a hospital for sinners. We treat it like weekly entertainment and a social club. That is a very real problem that isn't going away anytime soon.

The main problem from my perspective is that Americans, mainly Baby Boomers to Gen X, are absurdly spiritual but not religious. They care very deeply about saving souls and having deep connection with... something... which leads to people warping scriptures, politicizing their beliefs, and having victim complexes when they meet any sort of resistance. This is opposed to what I have seen from members of the Silent Generation and what I saw in Germany where they don't really seem to care about that side of the spectrum and are instead religious in the sense that they go to church because that is what you are expected to do and they go to church community events because, to them, that is what matters more. Then there is my generation who seem in ever growing numbers that they simply don't care about either since the spiritualists have poisoned the well because they're approaching extremist levels and they cannot reconcile that the religious dogmas don't line up with their worldly beliefs and values.

I dunno. It's hard to explain in a way that makes sense.

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Our Church is growing leaps and bounds. But the people contributing to this growth are considered "seekers." I acknowledge that most efforts of Christian ministries fail to reach much beyond the core of Christianized America. That is primarily because its much easier to work with seekers than to focus on the so-called atheists or agnostics or the completely disinterested. But we as Christians must find a way.

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