Jump to content

Speaking Of Shooting Yourself In The Foot- Low-Wage Workers Plan Walkouts, Protests To Gain $15 Hourly Pay


Recommended Posts

I feel bad for these people because someone is telling them that that have a shot in **** of getting 30K per year for flipping burgers or pressing a picture of a hamburger on a specially designed cash register that people have tried very hard to make sure that no skill is required to use it.

These folks bemoan that their wages cannot support a family, in jobs intended for teenagers. Well the completely obvious is happening as a result of their demands, and these jobs will not be available at all for anyone. Again, I feel for these folks, but corporations with unlimited R&D budgets are not going to have their profits cut into by folks with no leverage. They can easily be replaced and soon will be. Learn to love kiosks and robots cooking your food, because it will be the norm in the next couple of years.

Great job as usual union organisers

http://www.mcclatchydc.com/2015/04/14/263165/low-wage-workers-plan-walkouts.html

BY TONY PUGH

McClatchy Washington BureauApril 14, 2015 Updated 15 hours ago

P4b6u.AuSt.91.jpeg

WASHINGTON — Heartened by growing support for their cause and recent pay hikes by large corporate employers, America’s low-wage workers will continue their fight for higher pay Wednesday with protests, rallies and one-day walkouts scheduled in more than 200 cities.

The actions are expected to attract thousands of participants in what organizers are calling the “most widespread mobilization ever by U.S. workers seeking higher pay.”

Fast food cooks and cashiers are expected to strike in 230 cities, including New York, Los Angeles, Detroit, St. Louis, Kansas City, Mo., and Raleigh, N.C.

The growing effort to boost the wages and bargaining clout of workers in non-union establishments took off in November 2012, when 200 fast food employees in New York City left their jobs in protest, calling for $15 hourly wages and the right to unionize.

Since then, strong financial support from theService Employees International Union has helped the “ Fight for 15” movement expand to home care workers, retail employees, child care workers, airport service workers and even adjunct college professors seeking $15,000 per course.

International protesters, in solidarity with their U.S. counterparts, will march in more than 100 cities in 35 countries, organizers say. That includes a one-day walkout by fast food workers in New Zealand and by restaurant, hotel and tourism workers in Italy.

Experts say the growth, organization and sweep of the “Fight for 15” movement is unique.

“In my lifetime, it’s relatively unprecedented,” said Harry Holzer, a professor of public policy at Georgetown University who’s an expert on the low-wage labor market.

Following the loss of more than 8 million jobs in the Great Recession, the Occupy Wall Street movement helped channel the public’s growing anger at perceived corporate greed in the financial services sector.

Fight for 15 is an extension of that movement, seeking financial and social justice for perceived economic inequalities, said Sylvia Allegretto, an economist at the Institute for Research on Labor and Employment at the University of California, Berkeley.

“Low-wage workers really paid the price for the Great Recession brought to you by the wizards of Wall Street who are now booming,” Allegretto said. “CEO pay is back to being hundreds of times more than what the typical worker makes. Corporate profits are doing very well. And these workers are saying ‘Wait a minute. What about us?’ ”

Critics warn that raising wages for low-skilled workers might lead employers to eliminate positions or cut hours for the very people the higher pay is designed to help.

The Employment Policies Institute, a research organization, on Tuesday launched a new website, “ The Faces of $15,” that highlights businesses that had to raise prices, change policies or close because of $15 hourly wages.

Laura Rollins, a part-time McDonald’s restaurant worker in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., said her pay would rise $1 an hour – to $9.45 – in July, when a newly announced pay increase for company employees kicks in.

After walking off the job in a similar wage protest last year, Rollins, 63, said she’d continue to fight for $15 an hour, in spite of the recent raise.

“We’re going to win this, because McDonald’s is going to sooner or later realize that we’re not playing,” Rollins said. “We are real and we are serious and we are the people. And our voices have got to be heard.”

In a statement, McDonald’s spokeswoman Lisa McComb said the company’s $1 hourly raise was “an important and meaningful first step as we continue to look at opportunities that will make a difference for employees.”

As for the walkouts planned for Wednesday, McComb added: “We respect people’s right to peacefully protest, and our restaurants remain open every day with the focus on providing an exceptional experience for our customers.”

From 2003 to 2013, inflation-adjusted wages for the bottom 70 percent of U.S. workers either were flat or declined, according to the labor institute at Cal Berkeley.

While there’s been movement lately – such as recent pay hikes by McDonald’s and other large employers such as Target, Wal-Mart and the discount retailer TJX – the pay of most low-wage workers still lags far behind inflation.

The push for $15 an hour, however, has helped spur public action to address the problem. San Francisco, Seattle and SeaTac, Wash., have adopted $15 an hour minimum wages. Similar campaigns are underway in the cities of Los Angeles, Washington and New York.

A new report by the National Employment Law Project, an advocacy organization, found that 42 percent of U.S. workers earn less than $15 an hour. And six occupations with median hourly wages of less than $15 are among the 10 slated to add the most jobs in coming years. They are retail salespeople, food preparation and service workers, freight and stock workers, janitors, nursing assistants and home care workers.

“If we want an economy that is balanced and shares prosperity fairly, we must raise wages in these sectors so that they can serve as cornerstones to rebuilding our nation’s disappearing middle class,” said Christine Owens, executive director of the National Employment Law Project.

Shalove Lawrence of Atlanta has been a personal care worker for more than 15 years. She just got a 24-cent hourly raise – to $7.49 – after more than six years with the same company.

In caring for older, disabled and chronically ill patients, Lawrence, who’s 39, typically works seven straight days from 2 to 10 p.m., followed by a week off. In her spare time, she does housekeeping and other odd jobs to make ends meet, leaving little time to spend with her 10-year-old daughter, Tylar.

“I have people that I take care of, maybe go take them to the store or go and clean their house. Little stuff that’ll help me to be able to pay my bills,” Lawrence said. “But I shouldn’t have to go and do that. . . I can’t even do special things with my daughter. She’s 10 now. She should be able to enjoy her mom on times when I don’t have to work, and we can’t even do that.”

Because of her low pay, Lawrence qualifies for food stamps, which have become a lifeline for many low-wage workers.

A new report by the labor institute at Cal Berkeley found that 10.3 million families that have at least one family member who works receive food stamps through the federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program.

However, Michael Saltsman, research director at the Employment Policies Institute, said anecdotal evidence suggested businesses were increasing prices and that some were even closing in San Francisco and Oakland, where the minimum wage was recently increased.

One Bay Area restaurant eliminated tipping when it instituted the pay increase, which Saltsman said would leave employees earning less than they did before the raise.

He said public policy should instead look for ways to help low-wage workers without putting minimum-wage, entry-level jobs at risk.

“That’s the most important thing: making sure those job pathways continue to exist,” Saltsman said.

As the demand for higher wages continues, Holzer, of Georgetown University, said he didn’t think the movement would find success in lifting pay for all the sectors it represented.

The tightening job market, which is partly responsible for the recent wave of corporate pay increases, will continue to nudge wages higher for low-paid workers, Holzer said.

“But they’re not going to have a lot of really quick successes beyond a lot of these $1 or $2 raises, I don’t think,” Holzer said.

Efforts to unionize aren’t likely to succeed, either, because of the difficulty involved and the fact that private-sector unionism has been declining for more than 60 years.

“I don’t see that turning around,” Holzer said.

What might develop, however, is a robust social movement of low-wage workers across various industries that could become a political force that lobbies for various issues.

“Once they’ve figured out how to organize workers in a movement, though not necessarily a union, they have to think about what they’re going to do with that organizational skill,” Holzer said. “What’s their plan B?”

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's either the corporations pay them a living wage or the taxpayers subsidize their payroll through welfare. Pick your poison.

Faulty argument since that is already happening, and it's not my poison to pick. These changes in the service industry are coming. These jobs will not exist in the near future. These unrealistic salary demands are just hastening their own demise.

Fast-Food Wages Come With a $7 Billion Side of Public Assistance

http://www.bloomberg.com/bw/articles/2013-10-15/mcdonalds-low-wages-come-with-a-7-billion-side-of-welfare

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's either the corporations pay them a living wage or the taxpayers subsidize their payroll through welfare. Pick your poison.

I am not one to pass judgement, but IMO these are lazy people that will never get ahead in life until they realize it and make something of themselves. We are not talking about people with disabilities here...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Faulty argument since that is already happening, and it's not my poison to pick. These changes in the service industry are coming. These jobs will not exist in the near future. These unrealistic salary demands are just hastening their own demise.

Fast-Food Wages Come With a $7 Billion Side of Public Assistance

http://www.bloomberg.com/bw/articles/2013-10-15/mcdonalds-low-wages-come-with-a-7-billion-side-of-welfare

Like it or not, low end service jobs comprise a pretty big percentage of what passes as our economic "recovery". They certainly don't measure up to all of the middle class jobs that were lost over the years. But reality is what it is. But that won't stop those with no answer to just call then lazy and demand that they pull themselves up by the bootstraps or some other useless platitude.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am not one to pass judgement, but IMO these are lazy people that will never get ahead in life until they realize it and make something of themselves. We are not talking about people with disabilities here...

As someone who makes blanket statements, I'm not usually the person rejecting them, but fast food work makes for a pretty tough day at the office. I wouldn't say they are lazy, I think its more of a cycle phenomena. For many, this type work is all they've ever known and all they think they can obtain. Many did not do well in school, so they think that ship has sailed. Many are single parents and are trying to just make ends meet in a job they know they can get without what must seem like impossible odds to get training and move up and out of their present circumstances.

I get the arguments and can sympathize with many of those making them, but continuing to make excuses for the cycle does not help break it. I would be all for sending these folks to school and helping take care of them during their education. Many would fail and game the system, but many could succeed as well. The kicker is that there has to be some consequences for failing and gaming the system and our society would never support that so this would just be another feel good program destined to fail.

I don't know the answer, but the answer is not trying to make businessmen pay far more for a service than it is worth, being businessmen, they won't do it because it is bad business. They will find an alternative solution and continue on with their successful business and never looking back at the people screaming for higher wages just because they think they deserve them. Instead the will be left with no wages at all.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's either the corporations pay them a living wage or the taxpayers subsidize their payroll through welfare. Pick your poison.

Or they get the living wage that you refer to which does nothing but push the poverty line to a higher income threshold and the taxpayers still subsidize through welfare. That's how it's worked so far with each minimum wage increase...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There's college graduates that are having a hard time pulling $15/hr yet there will be people that see no problem with giving these people $15 an hour...

15 hr = 30k per year based on a 40 hr week.

So burger flippers and other NO SKILLED workers "deserve" this salary as a minimum? (That question is rhetorical, not asked of you cap)

Just for perspective, how do other positions that require skill, training, and\or education compare?

Ambulance Driver

Getting people from their homes or accidents to the hospital can be nerve wracking, but if you can handle the pressure, you can earn a starting wage of $25,000 per year depending on the local need for the position.

While you may not need a college education for this job, any Medical degree along with both Red Cross first-aid training and Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) training should set you up for being able to get a job as an ambulance driver.

Automotive Mechanic

With a starting wage of around $25,000 a year, automotive mechanics can expect to average around $28,000 to $37,000 early on in their career.

You’ll want to get an Associate/Vocational Degree in Automotive Technology or Automotive Analysis to get yourself familiar with the complexities of the modern automobile.

Biochemist

Medical careers, be they primary like doctors and nurses, or secondary like biochemists, are currently growing in demand, and as such, salary expectations are shifting upwards. A starting salary for a biochemist is currently around $35,00 per year, with the average ranging between $39,000 and $52,000.

Earning an advanced degree in Biochemistry, Biology or Chemistry should set you on the right path to getting yourself employed as a Biochemist.

Biologist

Earning an average starting wage of $37,000, a Biologist can expect to earn more depending on the demand in the location to fill the position.

A bachelors degree or higher in Biological Sciences including Genetics, Pathology and Biology is needed to get started in a career as a Biologist.

Bookkeeper

Keeping track of what companies are spending their money on and that it all balances out can be a much needed job at this point and time, an you can earn a no experience starting wage as a bookkeeper of $28,000 per year.

You will want to focus on getting a Bachelor’s degree in Accounting or Bookkeeping to gain access to this career option.

Bricklayer

Working with your hands, outside in a career that is looking for more skilled laborers, a bricklayer can earn around $37,000 starting with little to no experience.

One of the hardest parts about getting into certain careers that don’t require a College education is finding out how to gain the skills and experience. To become a bricklayer, you will need to find a company or school that sets up apprenticeships as this is one career where you need to learn from someone doing the job.

Computer Numeric Control Machine Programmer (CNC Programmer)

Cutting parts out using a computer controlled system can be amazing to watch, and once you understand the programming language, it can be even more fun to do. A starting salary for a CNC Programmer is $25,000.

A College degree in Engineering that includes drafting, metalworking, computer and blueprint interpretation is key to really doing well in this career, but many technical and trade schools also offer CNC related courses and certificates to get you into the work world quickly.

Consumer Loan Processor

Entry level starts at $22,876 per year, with the average being in the $26,000 to $33,000 range.

Nearly any financial degree, and some experience in the financial field will set you up to process the vast amount of paperwork that comes with loans.

CopyWriter

Starting at a salary of $33,470, a CopyWriter can expect different yearly wages based on where they live, and what circumstances they are hired on under, as contract work seems popular for this career choice.

A College Degree in English, Journalism or Communications will open up the doors to becoming a CopyWriter.

Crane Operator

Expect to earn around $25,000 starting if you take a career in operating a crane in the US at this time with the middle range averaging around $32,000 to $49,000.

Another, non-College, career opportunity, but you can’t just apply to this job right out of high school, you’ll need to pass your Crane Operator Certification.

Dental Assistant

While some Dental Assistants I have talked to believe they do eighty percent of the work for one quarter the pay, most still take great pride in their job, and if that is something you are interested in, you will probably make around $26,000 to start.

An Associate Degree or Certificate as a Dental Assistant is needed to open up this career opportunity. There are a variety of privately run schools now dedicated to providing these courses outside of the normal Colleges and Universities.

Elementary School Teacher

Shaping the minds of the leaders of tomorrow, elementary school teachers can expect to earn a starting salary of $32,500 per year.

You will need both a Bachelor’s Degree in your area of interest, as well as going through your Elementary Teaching Certification course to be ready to teach a class of youths.

Geologist

With a starting salary of around $36,000 per year, a geologist could not only be an interesting career, but is one of those with what I’d personally consider a reasonable starting wage.

You will want to get your Bachelors of Science in Geology to qualify yourself as a Geologist.

GIS Analyst

Making on average, a starting wage of around $29,000, the wage of a GIS Analyst can range greatly depending on where in the United States they are located.

A BA/BS in Natural Sciences, Geography or related field should provide you with the background to get yourself a career as a GIS Analyst.

Graphic Design Specialist

While working for a company or a freelancer will greatly effect this figure, a Graphic Design Specialist with little to no experience can expect to earn a starting salary of $33,872 per year.

A degree in Commercial Art, Visual Communication, Graphic Design, Computer Graphics or Multimedia/Illustration will provide you access into the world of Graphic Design. Depending on your interests, you may want to take one of the more specialized courses as there will be a fair bit less competition than taking the more broad Graphic Design degree.

HVAC Mechanic

Keeping us all warm, or cool, depending on the season is the HVAC Mechanic, and if you decide to become one, you can expect to earn around $28,500 per year.

An Associate’s degree or equivalent formal training in HVAC repair and maintenance will allow you to work as an HVAC Mechanic.

Licensed Practical Nurse

While fairly low in the nursing totem poll, Licensed Practical Nurses are still in high need and as a starting wage, they do well at $32,000 per year. With an average range coming in at around $35,000 to $42,000 depending on experience and location.

You will be required to take a Vocational Degree in Licensed Practical Nursing (LPN) to become one and there are many Colleges, including private businesses that offer such courses.

Medical Laboratory Technician

Taking blood, doing ECG’s, and dealing with various fluids that come out of people is a job that can be challenging in more ways than one, but it can also be a very rewarding career, and starts at $33,000 per year in compensation.

A College degree in Medical Technology, or a Vocational degree as a Medical Laboratory Assistant should get you into the lab environment rather quickly and easily.

Motorcycle Mechanic

If fixing two wheeled vehicles is your passion, you can expect to earn a no-experience starting salary of $18,600 per year, with the average running closer to $23,000 to $34,000.

Network Administrator

A junior Network Administrator role will earn you around $38,000 per year. With the average making around $42,000 to $54,000 per year.

You will want to take a degree in Information Technology, Computer Science, orComputer Engineering to become qualified to be a Network Administrator.

Roofer

During the summer, being a roofer can be one of the best jobs. Working outside, getting a tan, and enjoying the heat. You can also expect a starting salary of $24,500 per year, with an average running closer to $30,000.

You’ll want to get a Vocational degree in Roofing, and seek out possible apprenticeship opportunities in order to gain the most opportunities in the field.

School Nurse

Taking care of the sick and injured children at a school might not be the most glamorous job, but if you enjoy helping children, you can also expect to earn $26,000 per year starting.

Earn your Bachelor of Science in Nursing, and it should provide you with access to the School Nurse positions.

Small Engine Mechanic

Fixing nearly everything other than cars, trucks and other larger engines, a small engine mechanic can expect to take home a starting salary of $25,000 per year.

It is recommended that anyone looking at becoming a Small Engine Mechanic get themselves at least a certificate related to the field, with those holding degrees gaining more opportunities in the field.

Solderer

Fusing two things together, either precisely, like electronics, or larger, like metal toys, a solderer can expect to earn a starting salary of around $23,000, depending on the job location.

Training in soldering or welding technology is preferred but no degree is needed to earn a job as a Solderer.

Systems Support Assistant

For those into computer technology, there are many different career options out there, but one of the most basic, but informative to take a strong look at is Systems Support, and you can expect a starting salary of around $33,000 per year.

Just as above, a degree in Computer Science or Information Systems should be all you need to gain a career as a Systems Support Assistant.

Tool and Die Maker

Depending on where you live, and your experience level, you can expect a starting salary of around $32,000 as a Tool and Die Maker in the United States.

A vocational degree and formal training in tool and die making is important but not always required, though as with many employment opportunities, those with higher education are getting selected more and more over those that aren’t.

Truck Driver

Moving heavy loads all over the world, Truck drivers are in it for the long haul, and depending on if you own your own truck or not, you can expect a different salary, but the average starting wage is around $30,000 per year.

Most companies will not hire a truck driver until they have passed certain tests and examinations, but it all depends on the type of position that you are looking for with long-haul truck drivers expected to sometimes take more involved courses. There are truck driving schools that will assist you in qualifying for such positions.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's either the corporations pay them a living wage or the taxpayers subsidize their payroll through welfare. Pick your poison.

Yep

People want fast food and convenience services but if the people providing these services aren't being payed a living wage we can;t very well expect to be able to get food quick and on the go can we? People scoff at the idea that these people are just "flipping burgers" but the reality they are part of the convenience industry that allows those of us with busy lives to operate by getting us food on the go.

So if you want fast food then the people providing that service need to be able to live and it's either Government handouts or companies paying them a living wage.

Edited by MAD597
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am not one to pass judgement, but IMO these are lazy people that will never get ahead in life until they realize it and make something of themselves. We are not talking about people with disabilities here...

WTF?

Are they lazy or are "WE" lazy for creating a demand for fast food due to our very busy lives? Thier is obvuiously a HUGE demand for fast food and that demand has to be filled by someone working at these places.

So we obviously want fast food, and right now people have to work at these places to provide that service. Yet we don;t expect these people to be able to live cause they just "flip burgers"?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

15$ to make a happy meal lmfao get these mother ******* out of here.. 10$ sure.. 15$ **** no.. just want I want to see is more rice burners and spinners sitting in the McDonald's parking lot because all they're employees be ballin

you want fast food right? Their is demand for this service, human currently still have to work at these places and humans still have to make enough money to live off of. The best thing you can do if you think burger flippers are a scourge on society is not go to fast food places and take the time to make your own meals.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

you want fast food right? Their is demand for this service, human currently still have to work at these places and humans still have to make enough money to live off of. The best thing you can do if you think burger flippers are a scourge on society is not go to fast food places and take the time to make your own meals.

I do make my own meals the once or twice a month I do go they generally" **** up the order and in the oilfield they make 18$/he to work at taco johns... give me a ducking break. I worked fast food when I was 15. Ittakes 0 skill to put pre made patties on the pan and flip them when the timer goes off...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When I was a teenager I made $3.75/hr. Did I expect a "living wage"? **** no! Because I was a teenager and I lived with my parents. I just needed enough money to buy myself a used car and a few bucks to go to the movies with my friends. The difference is these days those teenagers never grow up or they drop out of school to chill with their thug friends and then expect the productive members of society to pick up the bill. If you want a "living wage" finish school and get a real job! These entitled kids these days drive me crazy! I guess that's what happens when you grow up in a generation where everyone gets a trophy!!!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Many of the people working jobs like these aren't teenagers, they're adults with skills in other fields who can no longer find work in those fields. The characterization of all fast food employees as dumb teenagers doesn't fit. You can't decry the fact that the only jobs being created are low wage jobs, and then suggest that everyone working those jobs are morons.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Skilled labor or not fast food workers are providing an in demand service. Labor is labor and yes highly skilled labor should be payed more but you still need to pay living wages to those that provide other in demand services.

Just wonder when the blaming will stop and when the "boot strap" arguments will end with this kind of crap, we aren't even talking about unemployed people but now the "employed" are being told they are lazy even though they are providing an in demand service for our current society.

Edited by MAD597
Link to comment
Share on other sites

How long will it be before people finally realize that the minimum wage was the equivalent of $15 back in the 70s and the economic did not collapse? "Unrealistic" = what everyone was paid just 30 years ago.

Increase the minimum wage to what it was in the 70s and then adjust it every year for inflation.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

WTF?

Are they lazy or are "WE" lazy for creating a demand for fast food due to our very busy lives? Thier is obvuiously a HUGE demand for fast food and that demand has to be filled by someone working at these places.

So we obviously want fast food, and right now people have to work at these places to provide that service. Yet we don;t expect these people to be able to live cause they just "flip burgers"?

I have no problem with anyone providing this service, but no one from Mickey D's came to said fast food workers' door and said, "Hey, can you PLEASE work for us?" If you fill out an app knowing dam well what they pay (or are offered the hourly rate they tell you) and STILL take the job, WTF gives you the right to demand more money? Do a good job and work your way up like a lot of other people have. At minimum you should be able to expect a raise for your efforts contributing to the success of the business.

Supply and demand doesn't work in this instance. Not sure where you were going with that...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have no problem with anyone providing this service, but no one from Mickey D's came to said fast food workers' door and said, "Hey, can you PLEASE work for us?" If you fill out an app knowing dam well what they pay (or are offered the hourly rate they tell you) and STILL take the job, WTF gives you the right to demand more money? Do a good job and work your way up like a lot of other people have. At minimum you should be able to expect a raise for your efforts contributing to the success of the business.

Supply and demand doesn't work in this instance. Not sure where you were going with that...

Yeah, how dare people demand to get paid what was paid to workers in these same jobs just three decades about? Who do they think they are?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just my personal opinion, but I don't really feel that someone is entitled to a living wage just because they work 40 hours. And I'd also argue that $15/hour is well livability in most parts of the country.

The real issue isn't paying $15 for flipping burgers. It's the admin assistant or mechanic or painter that currently makes $15/hr that you'll now have to pay more. It's also likely to cause price inflation on some level, which of course is always regressive in nature.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...