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The Shotfather

White Cop Shoots Unarmed Black Guy In Back 8 Times, Plants Taser On Him. Just Another Day In America.

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See, here's the problem with that; you can say that because you don't identify with those that are being stereotyped. It's fine for you to say that "sometimes stereotypes are right more often that not" because in your mind stereotypes are justified if the person in question lives up to the underlying assumption of the stereotype.

It's fine for civilians to think like that because discrimination is natural to people. It's not great, but it's realistic that cops will think that about people. It perpetuates the cycle of systemic racism, however, to use stereotypes to make on-duty decisions about what to do with human beings, both because it allows for the assumption that young black males commit a disproportionate number of crimes to inform an opinion about an individual when most people are innocent and are affected long-term by being harassed or accused of crimes they didn't commit, and because it's the justification individual officers have used throughout the history of the United States to harass individual civilians outside the realm of the law knowing that they wouldn't face serious repercussions. Whether a cop is a hardened racist that believes in stereotypes as a valuable diagnostic tool for human behavior or a lily-white liberal completely unaware of his or her own hangups, (s)he has a duty to the state and to their fellow man to keep it out of their job.

Then we need to invent Robocop and quit hiring human beings because what you are suggesting is not humanly possible. You can't ask people to ignore the statistics when doing their job. Oh and I can say what I did in the post you are referencing because that's why I used the word "sometimes", it's what I meant not some jamming in to soften the blow...

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I wonder how certain, more priveledged people feel when they are stereotyped as racists simply because of the color of their skin, their political beliefs, religious beliefs, and/or how they dress.........

Nevermind, I already know.

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Because when the topic is abuse of power and the perpetuation of systemic racism by police, the obvious response is to point out how many police get shot instead of acknowledging that perpetuating the cycle is what makes society more dangerous for police, as well.

No, the obvious response is to take a post out of one context, apply it to a totally different context, then accuse someone of not acknowledging something they acknowledged earlier in the day.

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Yes, what part of it should I have disagreed with in your opinion?

The part that once again blames the victims for being shot when the punishment for their "acting the fool" is not to be shot. Just for starters....

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Then we need to invent Robocop and quit hiring human beings because what you are suggesting is not humanly possible. You can't ask people to ignore the statistics when doing their job...

The statistics say the vast majority of people have never committed a serious crime, that's why the police are tasked with investigating crime and collecting evidence rather than going with their gut even though they always know who the bad guy is on CBS.

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No, the obvious response is to take a post out of one context, apply it to a totally different context, then accuse someone of not acknowledging something they acknowledged earlier in the day.

Was it before or after you suggested that the African American race has an equal responsibility with officers of the law to address that cycle of violence?

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Because you are talking about things you have no idea about in an "objective" tone with a past for the same systemic profiling that is a problem among cops today. Then you mention "acting like a fool" and etc. And you're speaking about it from a white point of view as if that is ever applicable in this discussion.

"Well I dont have problem with cops so it must just be the victims acting the fool."

So passive.......

Lol Serges alt

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Lol at just comply and no harm will come to you.

What planet do you all live on?

Only way to avoid getting killed by the police is to avoid them. That's the only way. If the police are around bad things will happen. It's not worth it to be anywhere near them, ever, at all.

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Real Talk: Part of what perpetuates the cycle of violence is that people who aren't tasked with identifying with the people regarded as "most likely to commit crime" have been conditioned to believe that being a police officer removes your agency by forcing you to make split-second decisions that determine life and death where answers that can be explained to the press the next day just aren't there.

In reality, cops have the gun and the position of social power, and there's no context whatsoever to draw their firearm, much less use it in the vast majority of all interactions they will have with civilians. In the comparatively tiny number of cases that result in an opportunity for a firefight to break out, they still have nonlethal methods of disabling suspects including training and equipment, and the ability to call for backup to subdue a suspect rather than engaging them like John McClain.

And yet, whenever there's the tiniest sliver of ambiguity in a case, as there will be literally 100% of the time when there's a dead guy and a cop with a black eye, cops get the full benefit of the doubt because it was him or them and because the other guy was clearly a worse human being for being an apparent criminal. Anyone that thinks that isn't a problem, or that it's a problem no one can do anything about it, might as well be saying that blacks are going to have to be more submissive to authorities because no one can expect a cop to be better than a psychopath.

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1. Should the cop have shot the fleeing criminal? No

2. Would the cop have shot fleeing criminal had he just complied with the officer? No

3. Did the criminal deserve to die? No

4. Did this cop commit murder? Yes

5. Did the criminal behave irresponsibly? Yes

6. Did the criminal contribute to his own death by running? Yes

7.Was it wrong for the cop to shoot the fleeing criminal in the back? yes.

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2. Would the cop have shot fleeing criminal had he just complied with the officer? No

5. Did the criminal behave irresponsibly? Yes

6. Did the criminal contribute to his own death by running? Yes

None of that matters. Plus, #2 is purely wishful thinking and speculation, as usual.

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It also seems weird to me that so many white people say things like 'If you just comply, none of this stuff would happen'. That's kind of the point...it doesn't happen unless you're Black.

http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2015/jan/5/police-officers-more-hesitant-to-shoot-black-suspe/?page=all

It’s widely assumed that white police officers are more likely to shoot black suspects as a result of racial bias, but recent research suggests the opposite is true.

An innovative study published in the Journal of Experimental Criminology found that participants in realistic simulations felt more threatened by black suspects yet took longer to pull the trigger on black men than on white or Hispanic men.

“This behavioral ‘counter-bias’ might be rooted in people’s concerns about the social and legal consequences of shooting a member of a historically oppressed racial or ethnic group,” said the paper, which went practically unnoticed when it was published online on May 22, but took on new significance in the wake of a series of high-profile police-involved shootings involving black victims over the summer.

The results back up what one of the researchers, University of Missouri-St. Louis professor David Klinger, has found after independently interviewing more than 300 police officers: While they don’t want to shoot anybody, they really don’t want to shoot black suspects.

“Across these 300 interviews, I have multiple officers telling me that they didn’t shoot only because the suspect was black or the suspect was a woman, or something that would not be consistent with this narrative of cops out there running and gunning,” said Mr. Klinger, a former cop and author of “Into the Kill Zone: A Cop’s Eye View of Deadly Force” (2006).

“When it comes to the issue of race, I’ve never had a single officer tell me, ‘I didn’t shoot a guy because he was white.’ I’ve had multiple officers tell me, ‘I didn’t shoot a guy because he was black,’ ” Mr. Klinger said. “And this is 10, even 20 years ago. Officers are alert to the fact that if they shoot a black individual, the odds of social outcry are far greater than if they shoot a white individual.”

In fact, he said, officers involved in shootings have told him that they were actually relieved that the person they shot was white, not black.

“The second things is, I’ve had multiple officers tell me they were worried in the wake of a shooting because they shot a black person, and I’ve had multiple officers tell me that they were glad that the person they shot was white,” Mr. Klinger said. “Because then they knew they weren’t going to have to be subject to the racial harangue.”

The interviews, which he conducted for a book he’s planning to finish this year, run directly counter to the prevailing view pushed by social justice groups, politicians and others: that shooting victims such as 18-year-old Michael Brown in Ferguson were victims at least in part of racial discrimination against blacks among cops.

“Police officers — at least the ones I interviewed — are very sensitive to the race issue, but not in the way this popular narrative is running, i.e., cops are out there trying to find young black men who don’t have guns so they can shoot them down like dogs in the street,” Mr. Klinger said. “That just isn’t anything I’ve found in any of the research that I’ve done.”

The study, “Racial and ethnic bias in decisions to shoot seen through a stronger lens: experimental results from high-fidelity laboratory simulations,” was conducted by Mr. Klinger and Washington State University assistant research professor Lois James and criminal justice and criminology professor Bryan Vila.

For their research, the authors used a pioneering WSU simulation involving full-size, high-definition video instead of photos and handguns modified to shoot infrared beams instead of the “shoot” buttons typically used in deadly-force studies.

About a third of the scenarios in the study were “no shoot” situations in which perpetrators of different races held cellphones or wallets, while the rest were “shoot” situations in which suspects were armed with knives or guns.

The study found that the 48 participants waited longest before firing on black suspects in “shoot” scenarios, even though the participants exhibited “stronger threat responses” when facing black suspects than with white or Hispanic suspects.

Eighty-five percent of the participants were white, and none was a police officer. At the same time, a 2013 study led by Ms. James using active police, military and the general public found the same phenomenon: All three groups took longer to shoot black suspects, and participants were also more likely to fire on unarmed whites and Hispanics than blacks.

“In other words, there was significant bias favoring blacks where decisions to shoot were concerned,” the 2013 study said, according to WSU News.

The findings challenge not only popular assumptions but also previous social science research suggesting that whites, including police officers, have an “implicit bias” against blacks. The drawback with such implicit-bias studies is that they use the push-button model and less realistic scenarios, said Mr. Klinger.

“That’s important research. It’s good research,” Mr. Klinger said. “The problem is it bears absolutely no relationship with actual shooting events. And people are not reading all the caveats that the authors put into the article saying, ‘This is not real life, this is a laboratory, we don’t know about external validity,’ and so on.”

So why are blacks shot more often by police? While the FBI’s national database has been widely criticized as incomplete, data compiled by Mr. Klinger in St. Louis over the past decade shows that 90 percent of police shootings involve blacks, even though they only make up 49 percent of the city’s population.

At the same time, he said, that figure is commensurate with the percentage of blacks involved in violent crime. Roughly 90 percent of those killed each year in St. Louis are black, and 90 percent of them are shot by other blacks, he said.

What’s more, he said, black SWAT officers make up about one-third of the St. Louis force — and they commit on average about one-third of the shootings each year.

“And this is consistent with every other study that’s ever been done,” said Mr. Klinger, who, as a rookie officer in Los Angeles, fatally shot a black man armed with a knife who had stabbed his partner, Dennis Azevedo, in the chest.

“Once you start looking at levels of violence, levels of threat, blacks are not shot in manners that are disproportionate to their involvement in illegal activity,” he said. “And it doesn’t matter if the cop is black, white or Hispanic, police officers presented with deadly threats use deadly force. Period, paragraph, end of story.”

Read more: http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2015/jan/5/police-officers-more-hesitant-to-shoot-black-suspe/#ixzz3WrodDEvf

Follow us: @washtimes on Twitter

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Was it before or after you suggested that the African American race has an equal responsibility with officers of the law to address that cycle of violence?

I never said it was equal. In reality, violent crime committed by blacks is a much much bigger problem.

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I never said it was equal. In reality, violent crime committed by blacks is a much much bigger problem.

It is totally a problem. You'll never find me saying it isn't a problem.

The problem goes both ways. Blacks commit a disproportionate amount of violent crime. It's one of the fundamental reasons they don't get the benefit of doubt. You aren't going to fix the racial bias epidemic of cops without fixing the crime epidemic among black males.

So what you're actually saying in these posts is that the race is responsible both for the disproportionate crime rate and the perception that they individually will be regarded as likely criminals?

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So what you're actually saying in these posts is that the race is responsible both for the disproportionate crime rate and the perception that they individually will be regarded as likely criminals?

So what you're saying is that blacks aren't responsible for a disproportionate amount of violent crime?

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So what you're saying is that blacks aren't responsible for a disproportionate amount of violent crime?

As a white person I don't feel "responsible" for the disproportionate rate of hard drug use in my race compared to black people, much less the failure of law enforcement to recognize that predisposition and treat me as a likely junkie as a result, it'd be a tad unfair of me to acknowledge that and then say the African American race is "responsible" for both for a higher crime rate and experiencing police brutality as a result.

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