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The Shotfather

White Cop Shoots Unarmed Black Guy In Back 8 Times, Plants Taser On Him. Just Another Day In America.

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To be fair here, saying "sometimes stereotypes are right more times than not" sounds like you're saying "stereotypes are right more times than not" and jamming the word "sometimes" at the beginning of the thought to minimize it.

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Don't you see the breakdown of telling a completely innocent black male that he's being abused by the police because of the disproportionate amount of crimes committed by people who are economically disadvantaged?

'Innocent guy, you're being hassled because you're black. Sucks for you.' is essentially what that boils down to. And you're suggesting that those innocent black people somehow have a responsibility to do something differently?

Sure, it may go both ways, but one person has a gun and has the entire government behind him, and the other guy's been getting harassed for his entire life, and is just trying to go about his business. Let's put the onus on the people who have the power and the control. Let's expect cops to act like public servants.

Let's also expect people not to violently assault one another. No doubt, expecting it to happen is all we need for it to happen. Amirite?

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I think using capologist as a kind of example actually makes sense. He's not a mean spirited guy. I seriously doubt he has ever treated a black person much differently than he would treat a white person. He confesses to some racial stereotyping in the past, but suggests that he no longer believes that black people should be stereotyped in that way.

He suggests that people often conform to common stereotypes. That's reasonable enough...that's why they're stereotypes.

But in his language, and the manner in which he discusses the unequal treatment of black people by the police, he puts the onus on the victim, completely disregarding the years of systemic inequality that black people experience form the police. They should do as they're told when they're innocent and being harassed. I think that's the underlying sentiment that perturbs me: that the police somehow have a right to engage in obvious acts of racism, and the onus is on the victim to endure the abuse, because the outcome could lead to them being shot. In this example, someone is continually harassed, abused, and then treated as a criminal by someone who unreasonably acts as judge, jury, and executioner...yet it's the victim who needs to change their behavior...not the violent racist who happens to be a police officer. I think there is an inherent insensitivity and callousness that goes with making that suggestion, particularly when you have been given the benefit of the doubt by cops because of your race.

No, I have never been harassed by the cops, even when I was drunk, trespassing, or tripping on LSD in a field in Conyers. They've always been very helpful to me. I also have friends who are doctors and lawyers who have been pinned to the ground, cuffed, and harassed for doing far less than things I have done. Traffic stops, simple ticket-worthy issues...none of these things are routine for the black American male. And I think it's terrible that when something like this happens, some people immediately point out what the victim could have done differently. You know what they can't do differently? Be white.

I don't think that makes one a racist. I think it makes one culpable for shrugging your shoulders, saying 'I'm not a racist', and continuing blaming the victims instead of the actual perpetrators of violence. That's how racism continues, by not holding people accountable for their actions.

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Let's also expect people not to violently assault one another. No doubt, expecting it to happen is all we need for it to happen. Amirite?

We have means by which we can hold people accountable for their actions. We need to and develop systems for minimizing the likelihood of abuse, while maximizing the likelihood of accountability. Having police beating people for filming, and abusing people for trying to hold them accountable is unacceptable. Yet it continues, in part because people spend their time asking what the victim could have done differently.

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Thoughts .

First, this cop is guilty of murder. No doubt about it. Even without the tape, he would not be able to explain eight shots in the back.

Second, this incident is nothing like the other recent ones, because in those cases, the evidence leans toward the cops story. In this case, the evidence does no such thing.

Third, despite this, no one has given me an incident involving a completely innocent black male, with a clean record and no warrants, say picking up litter or helping an old lady across the street, getting shot. Scott had a warrant for not paying child support, and that a pillar of the community does not make. No, he does not deserve to die, but when one sets up circumstances to cross with police, things can go wrong. This cop will go down for murder, but I think Scott would rather be alive and just doing what was asked would have allowed that.

Obey the law, have a clean record and no warrants for your arrest, obey the officer, and I promise you the chances of getting shot go nearly to zero.

For this stuff to end, both sides have to straighten up their act. Cops have to act professional at all times and shoot when only necessary. Blacks have to stop the antagonizing tactics toward cops.

All that said, before I would ever say there is a epidemic of cops shooting blacks, I would like context on the whole. Meaning, I would like to see the numbers of blacks shot by white cops, blacks shot by black cops, whites shot by white cops, and whites shot by black cops. We are not getting the whole story from the media. We are getting publicized cases seemingly meant to create hostility between blacks and whites.

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I think using capologist as a kind of example actually makes sense. He's not a mean spirited guy. I seriously doubt he has ever treated a black person much differently than he would treat a white person. He confesses to some racial stereotyping in the past, but suggests that he no longer believes that black people should be stereotyped in that way.

He suggests that people often conform to common stereotypes. That's reasonable enough...that's why they're stereotypes.

But in his language, and the manner in which he discusses the unequal treatment of black people by the police, he puts the onus on the victim, completely disregarding the years of systemic inequality that black people experience form the police. They should do as they're told when they're innocent and being harassed. I think that's the underlying sentiment that perturbs me: that the police somehow have a right to engage in obvious acts of racism, and the onus is on the victim to endure the abuse, because the outcome could lead to them being shot. In this example, someone is continually harassed, abused, and then treated as a criminal by someone who unreasonably acts as judge, jury, and executioner...yet it's the victim who needs to change their behavior...not the violent racist who happens to be a police officer. I think there is an inherent insensitivity and callousness that goes with making that suggestion, particularly when you have been given the benefit of the doubt by cops because of your race.

No, I have never been harassed by the cops, even when I was drunk, trespassing, or tripping on LSD in a field in Conyers. They've always been very helpful to me. I also have friends who are doctors and lawyers who have been pinned to the ground, cuffed, and harassed for doing far less than things I have done. Traffic stops, simple ticket-worthy issues...none of these things are routine for the black American male. And I think it's terrible that when something like this happens, some people immediately point out what the victim could have done differently. You know what they can't do differently? Be white.

I don't think that makes one a racist. I think it makes one culpable for shrugging your shoulders, saying 'I'm not a racist', and continuing blaming the victims instead of the actual perpetrators of violence. That's how racism continues, by not holding people accountable for their actions.

Honestly, I think the onus is on both sides to fix the problem. Again, it's very hard for me to relate to what black people have endured, I can hear it over and over again (and I have as I've asked for some examples in discussions with real life people) but I still can't relate because I haven't walked in their shoes so even though GP can tell me he drives the other way if he sees a cop, I can't feel what he feels.

I think the difference here (and I appreciate your manner of discussion) is that profiling is a tactic based on statistics. Now, harassment is a different ballgame. If someone is pulled over that "fits the profile" but there's no indication of wrongdoing or anything more to go on than the color of a person's skin--that's definitely harassment and is 100% wrong and shouldn't be condoned.

Perfect example, in Macon, GA if a convenience store is robbed, a high percentage of the time it's going to be a black male between the ages of 20 and 30. Does that mean all young black men rob stores? Of course not. Is it wrong of me to assume when I hear of the robbery that it's probably a young black male when that's what the stats say? Of course not.

In this particular case the guy was pulled over for having a broken taillight. Nothing harassing about that, perfectly legitimate. Now Walter Scott has outstanding warrants on him and resists arrest and takes off running (bad decision on his part but NOT deserving to be shot even 1 time). Cop should have pursued, requested backup because the guy was unarmed and posed no immediate threat. That's where it went horribly wrong and is a serious problem and one that can only be fixed by law enforcement.

It appears in the beginning of the video that Scott knocks the taser out of the cop's hand and then takes off running. Had he cooperated, perhaps he gets cuffed and taken in for the warrants (which is what was supposed to happen)--now, that statement may sound like I'm trying to blame him but I'm not. In no way, is it justified to shoot this particular suspect--NONE. Where I think race entered into the equation was the cop's reaction to Scott running. Yes that is a problem but we can't ignore the other circumstances either--those are also issues that need to be addressed.

Stereotypes aren't going to be broken unless both parties involved do their part to break them. As you said, it's perfectly reasonable to have stereotypes but the key is to only act on them if proven true. I don't believe it's an unfair burden to ask a segment of people to help change the statistics to help reverse the stereotypes. They aren't going to go away just because one side participates though.

If I start seeing that robberies in Macon are 50% white and 50% black, I'm no longer going to assume the suspect is black. If someone is busted on child molestation charges, I'm no longer going to assume they are a middle-aged creepy looking white dude if the stats say it's 50/50. That said, I can't stop those assumptions just because I want things to be 50/50, they have to actually be 50/50 for the mindset to change.

Law enforcement needs a lot of reforming--that's absolutely true and in a lot of areas.

People need reforming too though. We have the responsibility of owning up to our mistakes and playing by the rules that are set forth. We don't get to run, resist a lawful arrest, etc. Eliminate the reason for reaction. That doesn't mean accept harassment, etc. but there are proper ways to fight legitimate harassment and those have to be followed for progress to be made. The whole it takes two to tango deal. I think it's a very valid point that it's far too easy for a cop to say "I felt threatened" and walk. That needs to be fixed.

I really wish I had the answers to fix it all but I don't. Maybe it's through better training for law enforcement and more educating people as citizens. Thank you for not portraying me as some runaway Klansmen. Your assumption is 100% correct, I don't treat black people any differently than I treat any other group of people whether it be white, hispanic, asian, etc.

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Crap

What's wrong, Mono? Man was just speaking his mind, is all. Blacks just gotta quit antagonizing law enforcement by doing all that stuff law enforcement have to tend to. This is some real forward-thinking dialogue if you ask me!

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To be fair here, saying "sometimes stereotypes are right more times than not" sounds like you're saying "stereotypes are right more times than not" and jamming the word "sometimes" at the beginning of the thought to minimize it.

Or to be more fair (and correct), perhaps I used the word sometimes purposefully to indicate that there are times stereotypes are proven correct more times than not (because that's how they become stereotypes in the first place) but acknowledge that they don't always hold true...

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Thoughts .

First, this cop is guilty of murder. No doubt about it. Even without the tape, he would not be able to explain eight shots in the back.

Second, this incident is nothing like the other recent ones, because in those cases, the evidence leans toward the cops story. In this case, the evidence does no such thing.

Third, despite this, no one has given me an incident involving a completely innocent black male, with a clean record and no warrants, say picking up litter or helping an old lady across the street, getting shot. Scott had a warrant for not paying child support, and that a pillar of the community does not make. No, he does not deserve to die, but when one sets up circumstances to cross with police, things can go wrong. This cop will go down for murder, but I think Scott would rather be alive and just doing what was asked would have allowed that.

Obey the law, have a clean record and no warrants for your arrest, obey the officer, and I promise you the chances of getting shot go nearly to zero.

For this stuff to end, both sides have to straighten up their act. Cops have to act professional at all times and shoot when only necessary. Blacks have to stop the antagonizing tactics toward cops.

All that said, before I would ever say there is a epidemic of cops shooting blacks, I would like context on the whole. Meaning, I would like to see the numbers of blacks shot by white cops, blacks shot by black cops, whites shot by white cops, and whites shot by black cops. We are not getting the whole story from the media. We are getting publicized seemingly meant to create hostility between blacks and whites.

100% spot on and agree...

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One last note, I feel there will eventually be a law enforcement pull back, so to speak. It is getting to controversial and tough for them to do their jobs. Management may try to negate risk by pulling back police patrols, but this will only hurt black neighborhoods who need protection.

I would definitely remove white officers from policing majority black neighborhoods for the time being. Too much tension is building, and because blacks will obviously not trust white officers, the effectiveness of their job will go down, and the chance for many more tragic confrontations will increase.

I support this officer getting what he deserves for murder, and I also demand professional, ethical policing, but remember, there are still a whole lot more bad guys out there that do not wear badges. My fear is, if we attack, scrutinize, and criticize police until we make the job so unattractive no one wants to do it, we will lose good cops, have fewer cops, and the bad guys will have a free for all.

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Obey the law, have a clean record and no warrants for your arrest, obey the officer, and I promise you the chances of getting shot go nearly to zero.

LOL. You're just too obvious.

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Thoughts .

First, this cop is guilty of murder. No doubt about it. Even without the tape, he would not be able to explain eight shots in the back.

Second, this incident is nothing like the other recent ones, because in those cases, the evidence leans toward the cops story. In this case, the evidence does no such thing.

Third, despite this, no one has given me an incident involving a completely innocent black male, with a clean record and no warrants, say picking up litter or helping an old lady across the street, getting shot. Scott had a warrant for not paying child support, and that a pillar of the community does not make. No, he does not deserve to die, but when one sets up circumstances to cross with police, things can go wrong. This cop will go down for murder, but I think Scott would rather be alive and just doing what was asked would have allowed that.

Obey the law, have a clean record and no warrants for your arrest, obey the officer, and I promise you the chances of getting shot go nearly to zero.

For this stuff to end, both sides have to straighten up their act. Cops have to act professional at all times and shoot when only necessary. Blacks have to stop the antagonizing tactics toward cops.

All that said, before I would ever say there is a epidemic of cops shooting blacks, I would like context on the whole. Meaning, I would like to see the numbers of blacks shot by white cops, blacks shot by black cops, whites shot by white cops, and whites shot by black cops. We are not getting the whole story from the media. We are getting publicized seemingly meant to create hostility between blacks and whites.

Great post. 100% correct. I'm sure you'll be attacked for it though unfortunately.

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Don't forget that when the cop tells you to get your information out of the vehicle, do it. Wait...... Someone got shot for that, too. Well ****.

Any idea what happened to that cop?

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Fox legal analyst: Planting weapons used to be “standard operating procedure” for cops

On Wednesday morning, “Fox & Friends” invited legal analyst Arthur Aidala onto the show to discuss the death of Walter Scott at the hands of Officer Michael Slager in North Charleston, S.C. In a recently surfaced video of the shooting, some have suggested that Slager can be seen planting a taser on the victim, to corroborate the story that Scott had been threatening him.

Aidala said that’s pretty much the norm.

“When I was in the DA’s office in the ’80s and ’90s, that was standard operating procedure,” he said. “Police officers — I hate to say this — would keep a second gun that nobody knew about on their ankle, so if they ever killed someone they shouldn’t have they would take that gun out…”

“That was before the iPhone and that would not be allowed,” said Brian Kilmeade. “Let me just ask you this…is this going to present a challenge if you’re representing the cop, the fact that he never helps the guy. He cuffed him, he walked away. The other cop comes and is helping him, trying to revive him–”

“Let’s face it, there’s going to be no sympathy for this police officer,” Aidala replies.

Watch the full clip below:

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Or to be more fair (and correct), perhaps I used the word sometimes purposefully to indicate that there are times stereotypes are proven correct more times than not (because that's how they become stereotypes in the first place) but acknowledge that they don't always hold true...

See, here's the problem with that; you can say that because you don't identify with those that are being stereotyped. It's fine for you to say that "sometimes stereotypes are right more often that not" because in your mind stereotypes are justified if the person in question lives up to the underlying assumption of the stereotype.

It's fine for civilians to think like that because discrimination is natural to people. It's not great, but it's realistic that cops will think that about people. It perpetuates the cycle of systemic racism, however, to use stereotypes to make on-duty decisions about what to do with human beings, both because it allows for the assumption that young black males commit a disproportionate number of crimes to inform an opinion about an individual when most people are innocent and are affected long-term by being harassed or accused of crimes they didn't commit, and because it's the justification individual officers have used throughout the history of the United States to harass individual civilians outside the realm of the law knowing that they wouldn't face serious repercussions. Whether a cop is a hardened racist that believes in stereotypes as a valuable diagnostic tool for human behavior or a lily-white liberal completely unaware of his or her own hangups, (s)he has a duty to the state and to their fellow man to keep it out of their job.

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One last note, I feel there will eventually be a law enforcement pull back, so to speak. It is getting to controversial and tough for them to do their jobs. Management may try to negate risk by pulling back police patrols, but this will only hurt black neighborhoods who need protection.

I would definitely remove white officers from policing majority black neighborhoods for the time being. Too much tension is building, and because blacks will obviously not trust white officers, the effectiveness of their job will go down, and the chance for many more tragic confrontations will increase.

I support this officer getting what he deserves for murder, and I also demand professional, ethical policing, but remember, there are still a whole lot more bad guys out there that do not wear badges. My fear is, if we attack, scrutinize, and criticize police until we make the job so unattractive no one wants to do it, we will lose good cops, have fewer cops, and the bad guys will have a free for all.

It's like a child's laughter

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I could literally post thousands of instances where cops were wrongfully shot. We could play that stupid ****ing game forever.

Because when the topic is abuse of power and the perpetuation of systemic racism by police, the obvious response is to point out how many police get shot instead of acknowledging that perpetuating the cycle is what makes society more dangerous for police, as well.

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From St. Louis To LA: Ten Cases Of Cops Caught Planting Evidence (VIDEOS)

AUTHOR: RANDA MORRIS APRIL 5, 2015 6:01 PM
10. Brooklyn Cops Caught Planting Guns On Multiple Citizens.

In January, Brooklyn district attorney Kenneth Thompson announced an investigation into a group of New York police officers who are accused of planting guns on at least six different suspects. While the results of that investigation have yet to be released, evidence against the accused officers, all from the 67th precinct, appears damning, to say the least.

The district attorney’s office began raising concerns after arresting officers failed to produce or name an alleged confidential informant, who they claimed had led them to 53-year-old James Herring. Herring was arrested on weapons charges and faced a 15 year prison sentence, as a result of those charges. After the officers repeatedly failed to produce the informant, Herring’s case was dismissed by the judge.

According to the district attorney’s office, there have been at least five other cases in which these officers failed to produce an alleged informant. Guns in all of the cases were supposedly discovered either in plastic bags or wrapped in bandannas, and had no identifying fingerprints.

“There could be dozens more,” public defender Debora Silberman said in Brooklyn Supreme Court. “Anyone who was arrested by this team — their arrests should be investigated.”

The New York Daily News reports that judges handling the officer’s cases described the cops accounts as ‘incredible’ and at least one judge accused them of perjury. After ordering Herring’s case closed and the records sealed, Justice Dineen Riviezzo said that she was glad to know there would be an investigation into the actions of the officers in question.

There have been cases of cops caught red-handed planting evidence on innocent people all across the country, from Ferguson to LA. Here are nine other cases in which police officers were busted for framing innocent people.

9. A Brooklyn detective testified that planting evidence on innocent people is ‘common practice.’

In 2008, Brooklyn police were caught on video, planting cocaine on an innocent person. Former narcotics detective Stephen Anderson testified in court, saying that planting evidence is a ‘common practice’ known to cops as ‘flaking.’ Anderson, who said he provided drugs to another officer who was going to be demoted if he didn’t have a drug collar.

“I had decided to give him [Tavarez] the drugs to help him out so that he could say he had a buy,” Anderson testified in Brooklyn Supreme Court.

He was asked by Justice Gustin Reichback, “Did you observe with some frequency this … practice which is taking someone who was seemingly not guilty of a crime and laying the drugs on them?” He answered, “Yes, multiple times.”

The judge then asked if he’d considered the suffering he’d inflicted on innocent people. Anderson responded:

“It was something I was seeing a lot of, whether it was from supervisors or undercovers and even investigators. It’s almost like you have no emotion with it, that they attach the bodies to it, they’re going to be out of jail tomorrow anyway; nothing is going to happen to them anyway.”

8. Ex-cop was convicted of planting evidence, but got no jail time.

Again a Brooklyn cop was convicted of planting drugs on an innocent couple in 2011. While a person convicted of using or selling drugs can face a sentence of life jail, cops who are caught framing innocent people apparently get no jail time at all. Officer Jason Arbeeny was given five years probation and community service, following a felony conviction for planting evidence.

7. St. Louis police officers were recorded threatening to plant a gun on a student.

Last fall St. Louis Missouri resident, Tony Robinson, used his cell phone to record two police officers, who he says threatened to plant a gun on him.

Here’s a video of Robinson talking about the incident, via RippDemUp TV on YouTube:

As we reported in December, one of the officers identified by Robinson was former St. Louis police officer Thomas Carroll.

Carroll and two prosecuting attorneys left their jobs in late September, amid accusations of abuse and corruption. Before he left the police force, Carroll was placed on suspension without pay, pending the results of an internal investigation.

While police refused to release details about the investigation, or the events that led to Carroll’s sudden “retirement,” the St. Louis Post-Dispatch reported:

It is widely known, through police and court sources, that Carroll was suspended amid allegations that he assaulted suspect Michael Waller, 41, who was under arrest.

The man who was beaten by Carroll was falsely charged with escaping from police custody. According to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, the two prosecuting attorneys, Bliss Worrell and Katherine Dierdorf:

“…were forced to leave their jobs because of their knowledge of events, the circumstances related to the charging of Waller, or both.”

The FBI was brought in to oversee the police department during the Waller case, and a binding agreement between Waller’s attorney and the St Louis Police Department prevented police from handling any evidence without oversight from the FBI.

Four days after they were issued, the escape charges were dropped. All other charges against Waller were also dropped at a later date. It appears that the female officer that can be heard on Robinson’s recording continues to work with the St. Louis police department. Authorities have not released her name.

6. Huntington Beach police officers admitted to planting evidence, more than once, in open court.

Huntington Beach, California police admitted in open court to planting a loaded gun in the trunk of a DUI suspect. Officers Brain Knorr, Dave Wiederin, along with five others who were involved in the incident, faced no criminal or civil charges for their actions. When called to testify about the gun they tossed into the man’s vehicle, the cops claimed they had planted it as part of a “training exercise.”

State police agency training officer Bob Stresak told OC Weekly that he had never heard of any approved officer training program that involved planting evidence. In a later statement to the LA Times, Stresak said that hiding firearms in civilian cars was not a part of the training courses offered by his organization, “which sets the training standards for more than 600 law enforcement agencies and 90,000 officers.”

During the trial officer Knorr admitted that this was not the first time he had planted evidence at a crime scene. However, the judge hearing the case would not allow further questioning in regards to the number of times the officers had planted evidence.

5. Two Las Vegas police officers planted drugs on a man, later claiming it was part of a ‘training exercise’.

Police in Las Vegas also claimed that planting evidence was part of a “training exercise,” after they were exposed in court. The two officers in question both testified that they had found the drugs in the vehicle of Mark Lilly. After they were caught, the officers claimed that they had planted the drugs as part of a training exercise, and just forgot they had done it. After an independent review board recommended that officers Kevin Collmar and David Parker be fired, Las Vegas Metro police decided to suspend them instead.

Executive Director of the Nevada chapter of the ACLU, Gary Peck, told the Las Vegas Sun:

“This case should shake public confidence in the entire criminal justice system. Here we have a case where the police planted evidence in a criminal case and then stood mutely by while it was used against someone. It should raise very serious concerns that our state’s largest law enforcement agency is one that does not believe that planting evidence is a fireable offense.”

4. Minneapolis police are accused of a planting gun after shooting 19-year-old Fong Lee.

A Minneapolis police officer shot 19-year-old Fong Lee three times in the back, then fired five additional shots into his chest, killing him. 72 hours later, a gun which police said they recovered near his body, was admitted into evidence. The gun had no fingerprints, no smudges and no DNA. The owner of the gun testified that it had been in police custody for two years, before it was “found” near Fong Lee’s body.

3. An Arizona cop was caught on video planting a crack pipe on a mentally ill, homeless woman.

Officer Richard Chrisman of the Phoenix police department was caught on camera putting drug paraphernalia down the dress of a woman described as homeless and mentally ill. After the video surfaced, Chrisman said he did it as a joke.

In September of 2013, Chrisman was convicted of aggravated assault and manslaughter, after he killed 29-year-old Danny Frank Rodriguez and his dog. Chrisman went to the Rodriquez home in response to a call from his mother, who said he had thrown something during an argument. Chrisman was sentenced to 7 years in prison.

2. A former Texas police officer caught planting evidence also got no jail time.

In March of last year, Roderick Hashaway, a former captain of the Winnsboro Police Department in Texas, pled guilty to depriving citizens of their right to be free of unreasonable search and seizure. The charges came after an FBI investigation which revealed that he had “planted and caused to be planted in a vehicle…methamphetamine… and thereafter seized and arrested [an individual] and charged him with unlawful possession of a controlled substance.”

Hashaway had previously boasted about taking part in more than 100 different drug arrests.

Hashaway was sentenced to three years probation and ordered to pay a $4,000 fine.

1. Floyd Dent, a Michigan man brutally beaten by Inkster police in January, released video implicating police in evidence planting scheme.

On March 26, Addicting Info reported on the brutal beating of Floyd Dent, a 57-year-old Michigan man. Video of the incident, which took place during a traffic stop, has drawn national attention.

Dent says that he saw Inkster police plant drugs in his vehicle, as he was being held in the back of a patrol car. Video from the scene shows an officer reaching into his pocket and taking out a plastic baggie.

The officer, Bill Melendez, was previously fired from the Detroit police department after a federal indictment. He was among 17 former Detroit police officers brought up on federal charges in a corruption ring, which included allegations of falsifying police reports and planting evidence. The officers were all charged with conspiring to deprive citizen’s of their rights. Melendez was also indicted on two counts of deprivation of rights under color of law, possession of a stolen firearm and carrying of firearm during crime of violence.

Here’s more on this story from Click On Detroit.

According to a 2013 report from the US Department of Justice, one in every three adults now has some kind of criminal history record. On any given day, at least 2.3 million Americans are incarcerated. We know that about 80 percent of people charged with felony crimes cannot afford to hire an attorney. The police know that too.

As cops become revenue collectors, instead of public protectors, as quotas are enforced and the number of arrests made, tickets written, and citizens stopped become important factors in officer promotions and demotions, police are being given a green light to violate citizens’ rights.

*Featured image credit: video screen capture, Click On Detroit

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